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If Gas & Electricity Weren't Paid For....

pozessed
Posts: 1,034
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3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?
tmar19652
Posts: 727
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3/16/2013 1:45:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM, pozessed wrote:
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?
This is just another form of welfare that steals from those who work hard to give to those who do not.
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darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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3/16/2013 1:58:38 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM, pozessed wrote:
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?

Highest tax burden in the world is 46.5% of gdp.

http://en.wikipedia.org...
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Pixel_Brains
Posts: 5
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3/16/2013 2:05:13 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 1:45:03 PM, tmar19652 wrote:
At 3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM, pozessed wrote:
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?
This is just another form of welfare that steals from those who work hard to give to those who do not.

It's definitely plausible for enough tax revenue to be generated for this purpose as long as some measures were taken to make it work but I don't think it's really a smart move. Though I do find myself agreeing with tmar19652 on the fact that people would start abusing this in the same way they already do with welfare.
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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3/16/2013 2:13:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Current levels, yes. However, if you lower the price of gas and electricity, you'll increase demand for it, making that unpayable.
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RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/16/2013 2:24:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 1:58:38 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM, pozessed wrote:
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?

Highest tax burden in the world is 46.5% of gdp.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

Denmark is at 49%
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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3/16/2013 2:31:56 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 2:24:51 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/16/2013 1:58:38 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM, pozessed wrote:
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?

Highest tax burden in the world is 46.5% of gdp.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

Denmark is at 49%

well fvck u.
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malcolmxy
Posts: 2,855
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3/16/2013 3:18:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 2:31:56 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 3/16/2013 2:24:51 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/16/2013 1:58:38 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 3/16/2013 10:13:08 AM, pozessed wrote:
I was just wondering if it is even plausible for taxes to generate enough revenue to pay for its societies gas and electric uses.

If it is possible would this affect any current government funded programs? (welfare for example)

Could some programs be taken away to have the money put to better use?

What are the pros and cons of this outlook?

Highest tax burden in the world is 46.5% of gdp.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

Denmark is at 49%

well fvck u.

Lesotho was at 63%.

The interesting one to me was AUSTRIA at ~43%. I guess the Austrian School hasn't qite found its way to...ya know...Austria yet.
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