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Equal State, Equal Education

thomas34
Posts: 1
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7/3/2014 7:31:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
As we grow up we are taught that we are all equal no matter what state, nationality, age, gender, or even birth defects. But the part I find funny is the separation of State and Federal in education. Making standards different from state to state and only having specifics courses required. If were equal shouldn't we be on the same intellectual level as well as our freedom?
storytimewithjesus
Posts: 64
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7/4/2014 11:52:17 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Nobody believes that all people are actually equal. Many of us recognize that things like race and gender are very poor predictors of a person's actual capabilities, but that doesn't mean that any two people (even two people of the same race, gender, age, etc.) are equal.

What they mean when they say that is that all people are supposed to be treated equally by the law. All citizens are to be treated equally by any particular branch of government. So all US citizens are to be treated the same way by the federal government, all citizens of Connecticut are to be treated equally by the government of Connecticut, etc. And technically, each of the states' laws says that if you are a US citizen (with some exception for non-citizens) and live in their state and are 18 or under, you can enroll in public school. You're not being treated differently based on your age or race or religion, you're only being treated differently based on which state you live in (which you have some choice over).

A better question is whether or not we ought to have more diverse, separate educational standards from one state to another or more centralized, standardized educational standards like NCLB and Common Core were intended to create. Considering that ideological diversity is very important to a society's ability to adapt, it's certainly not a bad idea to have different states teach people in different ways and even focus on different things (some may focus on math/science, some may focus on arts/music, some on literature/languages, etc.). Europe is often pointed to as an example of centralized educational planning working, but the biggest European countries are about 1/4 the size of the US in population and there are over a dozen countries with 1/8-1/4 or so of our population, meaning they have plenty of local competition from people who do things differently, and therefore each country is exposed to far more outside ideological diversity than the US. Our nearest neighbors all have much smaller populations relative to ours than any country in Europe has relative to its neighbors, meaning we're not exposed to the same levels of outside ideological diversity from close neighbors with whom we're regularly forced to interact. As a result, we need to do more to foster ideological diversity from within on our own, which we (sort of used to) do (but don't really do so much anymore) by giving the individual states much more autonomy over education.
ProfessorLiberty
Posts: 3
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7/5/2014 3:43:22 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 7:31:37 PM, thomas34 wrote:
As we grow up we are taught that we are all equal no matter what state, nationality, age, gender, or even birth defects. But the part I find funny is the separation of State and Federal in education. Making standards different from state to state and only having specifics courses required. If were equal shouldn't we be on the same intellectual level as well as our freedom?

We aren't all equal, we all are different, which kind of means we all are equal in the fact we are all different. The phrase "We are all equal" means that we are all equal in our rights which are derived from our exsitence.

Some people say that communities know what's best for their children. I take it a step farther; the parents and the kid are the only ones who know what's best. We all don't fit into the mold.
celinaB
Posts: 5
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7/14/2014 12:27:14 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
That was interesting. We can be equal as we apply for loans. A credit card may be a better solution to a payday loan. The credit card charges a lower rate of interest, and if necessary you can break the payments up over a few months so that you do not end up in a cycle that is difficult to break out of. However, you should be careful about relying on your credit cards to cover your basic expenses each month. Ideally, this should only be as a last resort if your emergency fund has already covered other expenses. It is still better than a payday loan if you pay the money off as quickly as you can.