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Good Economics books?

OreosAreCool
Posts: 23
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3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD
ColeTrain
Posts: 4,296
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3/11/2016 2:33:16 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US.

Awesome! You'll fit right in. :)

I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject.

ResponsiblyIrresponsible would be the man to talk to. He's the "expert" on the subject (and economics as a whole, really). Here's some of his advice about learning more about economics from a basic level upwards.

[http://www.debate.org...] Otherwise, hang around the forum... you can learn a lot by doing that. Also, search the web. There's a lot of good online resources. Brookings is good, too... I've used it quite a bit. A lot of it you can learn along the way as well. Of course, ResponsiblyIrresponsible is your best choice... even if he is in "hiatus mode" right now. :)

Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

Ooh, minimum wage. That's my speciality. Are you in favor of raising it?

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The post I linked gives some good ideas. Also, there are good blogs, too. [http://www.debate.org...] <-- Here's some blogs you can look up as well.

Hope this helps, and hope you stick around. The more the merrier! :)
"The right to 360 noscope noobs shall not be infringed!!!" -- tajshar2k
"So, to start off, I've never committed suicide." -- Vaarka
"I eat glue." -- brontoraptor
"I mean, at this rate, I'd argue for a ham sandwich presidency." -- ResponsiblyIrresponsible
"Overthrow Assad, heil jihad." -- 16kadams when trolling in hangout
"Hillary Clinton is not my favorite person ... and her campaign is as inspiring as a bowl of cottage cheese." -- YYW
OreosAreCool
Posts: 23
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3/11/2016 3:19:15 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
Thanks for the suggestions. I'll be sticking around here, as this seems like a great community, and yeah I think I'll learn alot from these forums too xD

and for the minimum wage, I was originally against it because of inflation-effect arguments as well as the jobs-loss argument, but now I feel like there should be some sort of "safety-net" for the workers who work those types of jobs (incase the market-forces end up lowering those wages while prices remain relatively the same). Idk, I just think more research is necessary on my part.
ColeTrain
Posts: 4,296
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3/11/2016 3:30:57 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/11/2016 3:19:15 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
Thanks for the suggestions. I'll be sticking around here, as this seems like a great community, and yeah I think I'll learn alot from these forums too xD

Great! :) If you have any questions, make a thread. :)

and for the minimum wage, I was originally against it because of inflation-effect arguments as well as the jobs-loss argument, but now I feel like there should be some sort of "safety-net" for the workers who work those types of jobs (incase the market-forces end up lowering those wages while prices remain relatively the same). Idk, I just think more research is necessary on my part.

Ah, I see. Both of your previous concerns are notable. The "safety-net" theory (and I say that, because it's strictly theoretical) is shaky. There's a large enough market that employees wouldn't work for wages that are "too low." They'd move on and find a new job. Regardless of how impactful a minimum wage is, we have one, so we have to make do with what we're given. The bad thing would be to raise it. If you're interested, I have plenty of debates on the topic...

I'd recommend you read a few. Here's one of my later ones. There's a forfeit, but there's still plenty of substantive content: [http://www.debate.org...]
"The right to 360 noscope noobs shall not be infringed!!!" -- tajshar2k
"So, to start off, I've never committed suicide." -- Vaarka
"I eat glue." -- brontoraptor
"I mean, at this rate, I'd argue for a ham sandwich presidency." -- ResponsiblyIrresponsible
"Overthrow Assad, heil jihad." -- 16kadams when trolling in hangout
"Hillary Clinton is not my favorite person ... and her campaign is as inspiring as a bowl of cottage cheese." -- YYW
themightyindividual
Posts: 98
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3/12/2016 5:24:08 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

I would say "Capitalism and Freedom" by Milton Friedman.
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,820
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3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

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BrendanD19
Posts: 2,046
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3/17/2016 12:31:11 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

I am currently reading Democracy At Work: A Cure for Capitalism by Richard Wolff. Wolff is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Adjunct Professor at the New School. Its very readable and fascinating.
Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century is also fascinating, but like Marx's Das Kapital, you really need A LOT of free time to read this book and a couple bottles of asprin
BrendanD19
Posts: 2,046
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3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine
rohan1574
Posts: 1
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4/5/2016 5:43:02 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
With basic knowledge in economics and desire to enhance macroeconomic understanding ill strongly recommend 'RETURN OF DEPRESSION ECONOMICS' by PAUL KRUGMAN (Nobel laureate).
someloser
Posts: 1,377
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4/20/2016 1:56:10 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
Debunking Economics by Steve Keen
Ego sum qui sum. Deus lo vult.

"America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea." - Simon Bolivar

"A healthy nation is as unconscious of its nationality as a healthy man of his bones. But if you break a nation's nationality it will think of nothing else but getting it set again." - George Bernard Shaw
ColeTrain
Posts: 4,296
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4/20/2016 2:09:22 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/20/2016 1:56:10 AM, someloser wrote:
Debunking Economics by Steve Keen

Lol
"The right to 360 noscope noobs shall not be infringed!!!" -- tajshar2k
"So, to start off, I've never committed suicide." -- Vaarka
"I eat glue." -- brontoraptor
"I mean, at this rate, I'd argue for a ham sandwich presidency." -- ResponsiblyIrresponsible
"Overthrow Assad, heil jihad." -- 16kadams when trolling in hangout
"Hillary Clinton is not my favorite person ... and her campaign is as inspiring as a bowl of cottage cheese." -- YYW
someloser
Posts: 1,377
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4/20/2016 2:09:51 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/20/2016 2:09:22 AM, ColeTrain wrote:
At 4/20/2016 1:56:10 AM, someloser wrote:
Debunking Economics by Steve Keen

Lol

)
Ego sum qui sum. Deus lo vult.

"America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea." - Simon Bolivar

"A healthy nation is as unconscious of its nationality as a healthy man of his bones. But if you break a nation's nationality it will think of nothing else but getting it set again." - George Bernard Shaw
ColeTrain
Posts: 4,296
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4/20/2016 2:14:48 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/20/2016 2:09:51 AM, someloser wrote:
At 4/20/2016 2:09:22 AM, ColeTrain wrote:
At 4/20/2016 1:56:10 AM, someloser wrote:
Debunking Economics by Steve Keen

Lol

)

The forum really needs updated... :/
"The right to 360 noscope noobs shall not be infringed!!!" -- tajshar2k
"So, to start off, I've never committed suicide." -- Vaarka
"I eat glue." -- brontoraptor
"I mean, at this rate, I'd argue for a ham sandwich presidency." -- ResponsiblyIrresponsible
"Overthrow Assad, heil jihad." -- 16kadams when trolling in hangout
"Hillary Clinton is not my favorite person ... and her campaign is as inspiring as a bowl of cottage cheese." -- YYW
someloser
Posts: 1,377
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4/20/2016 2:20:00 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/20/2016 2:14:48 AM, ColeTrain wrote:
The forum really needs updated... :/

Yep
Ego sum qui sum. Deus lo vult.

"America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea." - Simon Bolivar

"A healthy nation is as unconscious of its nationality as a healthy man of his bones. But if you break a nation's nationality it will think of nothing else but getting it set again." - George Bernard Shaw
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:04:41 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
This is very well biased, but here's some good economics books that I enjoyed, and it's ranked in order of when you should read them.

Economics in one lesson by Henry Hazlitt
A Monetary History of the U.S. by Friedman
Money Mischief by Friedman
Capitalism and Freedom by Friedman
Free to Choose by Friedman
Road to Serfdom by Hayek

And so on...
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:05:22 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 3/11/2016 3:19:15 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
Thanks for the suggestions. I'll be sticking around here, as this seems like a great community, and yeah I think I'll learn alot from these forums too xD

and for the minimum wage, I was originally against it because of inflation-effect arguments as well as the jobs-loss argument, but now I feel like there should be some sort of "safety-net" for the workers who work those types of jobs (incase the market-forces end up lowering those wages while prices remain relatively the same). Idk, I just think more research is necessary on my part.

Do not read anything from Krugman.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:05:45 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 3/12/2016 5:24:08 AM, themightyindividual wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

I would say "Capitalism and Freedom" by Milton Friedman.

I would as well. Great novel and an easy read.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
BrendanD19
Posts: 2,046
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4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
BrendanD19
Posts: 2,046
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4/21/2016 1:20:58 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.

Yeah, David Ricardo and Karl Marx and Thomas Paine, all thinkers that are studied widely and who made MAJOR contributions to the field of economics are dumb and you know EVERYTHING about economics.
SMH
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:26:58 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:20:58 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.

Yeah, David Ricardo and Karl Marx and Thomas Paine, all thinkers that are studied widely and who made MAJOR contributions to the field of economics are dumb and you know EVERYTHING about economics.
SMH

The Communist Manifesto was not an economic work. It was a political work made by a man who knew neither.

On the other hand, I would agree that Ricardo and Paine were great thinkers, but Paine was not an economist and Ricardo did theorize some useful ideas, such as the Comparative Advantage. On the other hand, the labor theory of value is absolutely wrong and has been proven time and time again by various economists to be a unacceptable in the field of economics.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
BrendanD19
Posts: 2,046
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4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:26:58 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:20:58 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.

Yeah, David Ricardo and Karl Marx and Thomas Paine, all thinkers that are studied widely and who made MAJOR contributions to the field of economics are dumb and you know EVERYTHING about economics.
SMH

The Communist Manifesto was not an economic work. It was a political work made by a man who knew neither.

On the other hand, I would agree that Ricardo and Paine were great thinkers, but Paine was not an economist and Ricardo did theorize some useful ideas, such as the Comparative Advantage. On the other hand, the labor theory of value is absolutely wrong and has been proven time and time again by various economists to be a unacceptable in the field of economics.

Technically you are correct, The Manifesto is not REALLY an economics book. But here is the thing NO ONE WANTS TO READ DAS KAPITAL. It is long, it is boring...did I mention Long and boring?
And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.
Again, stop trolling me, I don't want to talk to you, I find you annoying and irritating and I don't want to bother with you.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:38:19 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:26:58 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:20:58 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.

Yeah, David Ricardo and Karl Marx and Thomas Paine, all thinkers that are studied widely and who made MAJOR contributions to the field of economics are dumb and you know EVERYTHING about economics.
SMH

The Communist Manifesto was not an economic work. It was a political work made by a man who knew neither.

On the other hand, I would agree that Ricardo and Paine were great thinkers, but Paine was not an economist and Ricardo did theorize some useful ideas, such as the Comparative Advantage. On the other hand, the labor theory of value is absolutely wrong and has been proven time and time again by various economists to be a unacceptable in the field of economics.

Technically you are correct, The Manifesto is not REALLY an economics book. But here is the thing NO ONE WANTS TO READ DAS KAPITAL. It is long, it is boring...did I mention Long and boring?

Technically? It's not a technicality, it's a simple truth. Let me repeat it to you again - the Communist Manifesto is NOT an economic work.

Das Kapital, on the other hand, can be and in most cases is counted as an economic work, although its contribution to sane policies as well as how correct it is in its approach is debatable.
And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.

Yes, and there's still people who promote various other things in which people have reached a certain consensus already. The Labor Theory of Value is absolutely false, it's been proven time and time again to be false, and only few economists believe it, and even less credible ones.
Again, stop trolling me, I don't want to talk to you, I find you annoying and irritating and I don't want to bother with you.

Why say that if you reply to me? You're just showing your own stupidity. This is a debate site, and the fact that you want to simply ignore the debate portion and make points rather than arguments proves how much of an echo chamber this is for you.

Stop being a parasite and work for your damn money. Don't steal from those who produce.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
someloser
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4/21/2016 1:43:11 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.
And they would still be wrong. Particularly given modern technological advances, LToV is deader than ever.
Ego sum qui sum. Deus lo vult.

"America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea." - Simon Bolivar

"A healthy nation is as unconscious of its nationality as a healthy man of his bones. But if you break a nation's nationality it will think of nothing else but getting it set again." - George Bernard Shaw
BrendanD19
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4/21/2016 1:47:32 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:38:19 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:26:58 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:20:58 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.

Yeah, David Ricardo and Karl Marx and Thomas Paine, all thinkers that are studied widely and who made MAJOR contributions to the field of economics are dumb and you know EVERYTHING about economics.
SMH

The Communist Manifesto was not an economic work. It was a political work made by a man who knew neither.

On the other hand, I would agree that Ricardo and Paine were great thinkers, but Paine was not an economist and Ricardo did theorize some useful ideas, such as the Comparative Advantage. On the other hand, the labor theory of value is absolutely wrong and has been proven time and time again by various economists to be a unacceptable in the field of economics.

Technically you are correct, The Manifesto is not REALLY an economics book. But here is the thing NO ONE WANTS TO READ DAS KAPITAL. It is long, it is boring...did I mention Long and boring?

Technically? It's not a technicality, it's a simple truth. Let me repeat it to you again - the Communist Manifesto is NOT an economic work.

However Marx does explain his economic theories in the work.


Das Kapital, on the other hand, can be and in most cases is counted as an economic work, although its contribution to sane policies as well as how correct it is in its approach is debatable.

But in order to debate that you have to have read it. And I have no interest in reading it.

And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.

Yes, and there's still people who promote various other things in which people have reached a certain consensus already. The Labor Theory of Value is absolutely false, it's been proven time and time again to be false, and only few economists believe it, and even less credible ones.

The basic premise is that all wealth derives from workers. Workers produce wealth. That's it. If you fired all your workers you wouldn't produce anything and you wouldn't make any money. Those who do believe the theory also believe in supply and demand and see the LTV as a lead into S&D. Examples: Wolff, Galbraith, Varoufakis, Paniotakis and the late Paul Swezey.

Again, stop trolling me, I don't want to talk to you, I find you annoying and irritating and I don't want to bother with you.

Why say that if you reply to me? You're just showing your own stupidity. This is a debate site, and the fact that you want to simply ignore the debate portion and make points rather than arguments proves how much of an echo chamber this is for you.

Yes, it's a debate site, but I don't want to debate you. Please leave me alone, I have work to do. You believe in laissez-faire, right? You should apply that to me

Stop being a parasite and work for your damn money. Don't steal from those who produce.

Do I look like a Company owner or stock broker? No, I work in a service job, making sandwiches.
BrendanD19
Posts: 2,046
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4/21/2016 1:48:30 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:43:11 AM, someloser wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.
And they would still be wrong. Particularly given modern technological advances, LToV is deader than ever.

Not really, seeing as Machines do the labor. If no one works, no wealth is created.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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4/21/2016 1:54:45 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:47:32 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:38:19 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:26:58 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:20:58 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:11:07 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:09:38 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:06:25 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 3/17/2016 12:40:04 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 3/12/2016 6:59:47 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 3/11/2016 12:36:46 AM, OreosAreCool wrote:
So I'm very interested in macroeconomics, especially concerning the US. I have a decent understanding of basic economics, and the different economic models, but I sort of want to increase my level of knowledge and understanding of the subject. Some specific areas of interest for me are things like monetary policy, minimum wage, gold standard vs fiat, and the national debt, etc.

I wanted to know if you guys could recommend any good books I can read that would help me with this? Thanks xD

The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes are pretty much essential starting points for economics.

Also On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation and The Communist Manifesto are also good to help you understand general economic theory. I also like Agrarian Justice by Thomas Paine

Those are not economic theories, it's just morons thinking they are smart by offering free sh1t...

Stop trolling me

I wasn't. I was scrolling through the econ forum and saw your post, and since it was stupid, I decided to reply.

Yeah, David Ricardo and Karl Marx and Thomas Paine, all thinkers that are studied widely and who made MAJOR contributions to the field of economics are dumb and you know EVERYTHING about economics.
SMH

The Communist Manifesto was not an economic work. It was a political work made by a man who knew neither.

On the other hand, I would agree that Ricardo and Paine were great thinkers, but Paine was not an economist and Ricardo did theorize some useful ideas, such as the Comparative Advantage. On the other hand, the labor theory of value is absolutely wrong and has been proven time and time again by various economists to be a unacceptable in the field of economics.

Technically you are correct, The Manifesto is not REALLY an economics book. But here is the thing NO ONE WANTS TO READ DAS KAPITAL. It is long, it is boring...did I mention Long and boring?

Technically? It's not a technicality, it's a simple truth. Let me repeat it to you again - the Communist Manifesto is NOT an economic work.

However Marx does explain his economic theories in the work.

If I wrote a book and blabbered on a bunch of nonsense, and subjected it under economics, does that make me an economist, or at least a credible one? No, it most certainly does not. This man spent more time stroking his beard than he did with learning about economics.


Das Kapital, on the other hand, can be and in most cases is counted as an economic work, although its contribution to sane policies as well as how correct it is in its approach is debatable.

But in order to debate that you have to have read it. And I have no interest in reading it.

And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.

Yes, and there's still people who promote various other things in which people have reached a certain consensus already. The Labor Theory of Value is absolutely false, it's been proven time and time again to be false, and only few economists believe it, and even less credible ones.

The basic premise is that all wealth derives from workers. Workers produce wealth. That's it. If you fired all your workers you wouldn't produce anything and you wouldn't make any money. Those who do believe the theory also believe in supply and demand and see the LTV as a lead into S&D. Examples: Wolff, Galbraith, Varoufakis, Paniotakis and the late Paul Swezey.

All of whom are considering as being zeros in the economic field. With our current technological advances, the workers can easily be replaced with machines that do not produce wealth for themselves.

I've been wondering if Marx misunderstood Locke, or if Marx has been misunderstood (perhaps deliberately).

Locke described what amounts to a Labor theory of Property - that is, it is the labor I put into something that makes it my property - which makes sense. If I add labor to something, the result is my property, whether or not the result has value. Marx takes the next step of simply assuming that labor itself has value - which seems easily dismissable. Except that Marx states early on in "Capital" that he is not talking about labor done on things of no value. It seems to me that Marx is not guilty of the extreme stupidity of assigning inherent value to labor, but only of the lesser stupidity of believing that value can be aggregated and then subdivided into equivalent units. That is, the same type of stupidity that is found in Keynes - and much of modern macro.

Again, stop trolling me, I don't want to talk to you, I find you annoying and irritating and I don't want to bother with you.

Why say that if you reply to me? You're just showing your own stupidity. This is a debate site, and the fact that you want to simply ignore the debate portion and make points rather than arguments proves how much of an echo chamber this is for you.

Yes, it's a debate site, but I don't want to debate you. Please leave me alone, I have work to do. You believe in laissez-faire, right? You should apply that to me

If you have to work to do, then get to working. Quit whacking to porn and get off the debate site then.


Stop being a parasite and work for your damn money. Don't steal from those who produce.

Do I look like a Company owner or stock broker? No, I work in a service job, making sandwiches.

Oh, you're one of those "sandwich artists" from Subway? A company owner and a stock broker work as well, and their own work is far more important per capita than the work of various other labor institutions.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
someloser
Posts: 1,377
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4/21/2016 2:00:30 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/21/2016 1:48:30 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:43:11 AM, someloser wrote:
At 4/21/2016 1:30:56 AM, BrendanD19 wrote:
And there are still economists who promote the labor theory of value, even if it isn't the labor theory of PRICES.
And they would still be wrong. Particularly given modern technological advances, LToV is deader than ever.

Not really, seeing as Machines do the labor. If no one works, no wealth is created.

An iPhone is of value to someone regardless of whether it was created by manual labor or automated.

LToV is fundamentally wrong either way. Note that value is subjective and dynamic whereas labor is not
Ego sum qui sum. Deus lo vult.

"America is ungovernable; those who served the revolution have plowed the sea." - Simon Bolivar

"A healthy nation is as unconscious of its nationality as a healthy man of his bones. But if you break a nation's nationality it will think of nothing else but getting it set again." - George Bernard Shaw