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Broken Windows

fire_wings
Posts: 5,562
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8/31/2016 10:00:30 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
This is for the DDOlympics.

I just saw one article about this, and it was interesting, it is about broken windows.

There was a hooligan passing by a bakery, and the hooligan broke a window in the bakery. The owner ran out to catch the man, but the hooligan ran away, and the damage wasn't serious, so the owner just covered up the window with paper. A few days later after that broken window accident, there was garbage piled up in front of the bakery, and scribbling appeared on the wall, and customers began to decrease in the bakery.

So American criminal psychologists James Wilson and George Kelling published their thesis by saying that if the owner neglects minor damage, like the broken window above, then larger and more serious crimes occur, and these small things turn into a serious matter, like the customers were decreased.

Michael Levine also applied this theory by saying that if a company ignores a minor mistake, then it will bring unexpected losses, etc. for the company later on. Like when paints out of walls, toilets are dirty, waiters are rude, then it could lead to a great fall into the company. So, these people are saying like above, we should fix the windows.

And I am not the first one who brought this up. In the early 19th century, there were already debates about this topic. Like above, they say that we should repair the broken windows, but not all people say that. M. de Saint-Chamans believes that even though it brings loss to the bakery owner, the window shop owner gains that much, so there is no loss for the nation. Some other people think around the same thing as them also. What do you think?
#ALLHAILFIRETHEKINGOFTHEMISCFORUM

...it's not a new policy... it's just that DDO was built on an ancient burial ground, and that means the spirits of old rise again to cause us problems sometimes- Airmax1227

Wtf you must have an IQ of 250 if you're 11 and already decent at this- 16k

Go to sleep!!!!- missmozart

So to start off, I never committed suicide- Vaarka
David_Debates
Posts: 248
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8/31/2016 8:06:44 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/31/2016 10:00:30 AM, fire_wings wrote:
This is for the DDOlympics.

I just saw one article about this, and it was interesting, it is about broken windows.

There was a hooligan passing by a bakery, and the hooligan broke a window in the bakery. The owner ran out to catch the man, but the hooligan ran away, and the damage wasn't serious, so the owner just covered up the window with paper. A few days later after that broken window accident, there was garbage piled up in front of the bakery, and scribbling appeared on the wall, and customers began to decrease in the bakery.

So American criminal psychologists James Wilson and George Kelling published their thesis by saying that if the owner neglects minor damage, like the broken window above, then larger and more serious crimes occur, and these small things turn into a serious matter, like the customers were decreased.

Michael Levine also applied this theory by saying that if a company ignores a minor mistake, then it will bring unexpected losses, etc. for the company later on. Like when paints out of walls, toilets are dirty, waiters are rude, then it could lead to a great fall into the company. So, these people are saying like above, we should fix the windows.

And I am not the first one who brought this up. In the early 19th century, there were already debates about this topic. Like above, they say that we should repair the broken windows, but not all people say that. M. de Saint-Chamans believes that even though it brings loss to the bakery owner, the window shop owner gains that much, so there is no loss for the nation. Some other people think around the same thing as them also. What do you think?

The broken window fallacy is used by many, many Governmental policies, just under a disguise. All that broken window does is shift a job at the expense of the owner of the window. Instead of the owner of the window having a window and, say, a nice suit he was saving for, he now only has a window. So, in short, breaking the window has no effect on strengthening the economy, as it doesn't create value. Instead, it gives a glazier a job and takes away a job from the tailor. But the tailor is never seen, so it is quite easy to forget him.

This then brings up a big lesson: that we must learn to see both what is seen and unseen. These Governmental "job" programs, for instance, are simply taking more tax dollars and giving them to other people. It doesn't create value, but we don't see the value that money could have created. If the tax wouldn't have been increased, individuals would have had more money to invest in certain things, making more value for society. But we never see that, because the money is taken away.

I'd recommend Henry Hazlitt's "Economics in One Lesson" if you want to learn more about this fallacy.
Throwback
Posts: 421
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8/31/2016 8:25:23 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/31/2016 10:00:30 AM, fire_wings wrote:
This is for the DDOlympics.

I just saw one article about this, and it was interesting, it is about broken windows.

There was a hooligan passing by a bakery, and the hooligan broke a window in the bakery. The owner ran out to catch the man, but the hooligan ran away, and the damage wasn't serious, so the owner just covered up the window with paper. A few days later after that broken window accident, there was garbage piled up in front of the bakery, and scribbling appeared on the wall, and customers began to decrease in the bakery.

So American criminal psychologists James Wilson and George Kelling published their thesis by saying that if the owner neglects minor damage, like the broken window above, then larger and more serious crimes occur, and these small things turn into a serious matter, like the customers were decreased.

Michael Levine also applied this theory by saying that if a company ignores a minor mistake, then it will bring unexpected losses, etc. for the company later on. Like when paints out of walls, toilets are dirty, waiters are rude, then it could lead to a great fall into the company. So, these people are saying like above, we should fix the windows.

And I am not the first one who brought this up. In the early 19th century, there were already debates about this topic. Like above, they say that we should repair the broken windows, but not all people say that. M. de Saint-Chamans believes that even though it brings loss to the bakery owner, the window shop owner gains that much, so there is no loss for the nation. Some other people think around the same thing as them also. What do you think?

Every police offer is familiar with the broken window theory. I agree with it. Crime gets out of control when the lesser crimes are ignored. It always rises to the level of resistance.
When I respond with "OK" don't take it personally. I'm simply being appropriately dismissive.
BillSPrestonEsq
Posts: 135
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9/1/2016 11:10:37 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/31/2016 10:00:30 AM, fire_wings wrote:
This is for the DDOlympics.

I just saw one article about this, and it was interesting, it is about broken windows.

There was a hooligan passing by a bakery, and the hooligan broke a window in the bakery. The owner ran out to catch the man, but the hooligan ran away, and the damage wasn't serious, so the owner just covered up the window with paper. A few days later after that broken window accident, there was garbage piled up in front of the bakery, and scribbling appeared on the wall, and customers began to decrease in the bakery.

So American criminal psychologists James Wilson and George Kelling published their thesis by saying that if the owner neglects minor damage, like the broken window above, then larger and more serious crimes occur, and these small things turn into a serious matter, like the customers were decreased.

Michael Levine also applied this theory by saying that if a company ignores a minor mistake, then it will bring unexpected losses, etc. for the company later on. Like when paints out of walls, toilets are dirty, waiters are rude, then it could lead to a great fall into the company. So, these people are saying like above, we should fix the windows.

And I am not the first one who brought this up. In the early 19th century, there were already debates about this topic. Like above, they say that we should repair the broken windows, but not all people say that. M. de Saint-Chamans believes that even though it brings loss to the bakery owner, the window shop owner gains that much, so there is no loss for the nation. Some other people think around the same thing as them also. What do you think?

I think that even if subconscious, people recognize the owners lack of respect and adjust their behavior. I have noticed this in bad areas of a city of in nice areas of the country how it affects things like littering. Also partygoers in a frat house type place over a nice house. People see how much respect is currently given and it effects their judgment in my opinion. I think this can be related to personal relationships as well. How people are generally treated depends on their own level of self respect.