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JrRepublican
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4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Home schooling is the most effective method of education, and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 12:20:54 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

Parents often do not specialize in education, in the actual material that is being taught, nor in methods of teaching, meaning that they are not very efficient.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

To a degree, sure.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
JrRepublican
Posts: 44
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4/5/2011 12:22:55 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:20:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

Parents often do not specialize in education, in the actual material that is being taught, nor in methods of teaching, meaning that they are not very efficient.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

To a degree, sure.

My mother, who does not "specialize" in education, is doing fine with me--I'm in Algebra II, etc. And what about all of those homeschool students that win competitions in education?
JrRepublican
Posts: 44
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4/5/2011 12:23:26 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:20:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

Parents often do not specialize in education, in the actual material that is being taught, nor in methods of teaching, meaning that they are not very efficient.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

To a degree, sure.

To what degree? Where does freedom end?
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 12:30:37 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:22:55 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:20:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

Parents often do not specialize in education, in the actual material that is being taught, nor in methods of teaching, meaning that they are not very efficient.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

To a degree, sure.

My mother, who does not "specialize" in education, is doing fine with me--I'm in Algebra II, etc. And what about all of those homeschool students that win competitions in education?

Anecdotal. Your mother does not "specialize," but since she only has 1 pupil (or only a few, pending how many siblings you have), that makes up for it. If she had to teach 40 kids, they would likely all utterly fail. If you took an actual school teacher and paired it 1 on 1 with a student full time for 10 years, that student would far surpase you.

I.E. parents teaching is not the most efficient method. A professional teacher, paired with a single pupil (or multiple teachers, for a single pupil) is a more efficient method.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 12:31:23 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:23:26 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:20:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

Parents often do not specialize in education, in the actual material that is being taught, nor in methods of teaching, meaning that they are not very efficient.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

To a degree, sure.

To what degree? Where does freedom end?

In my opinion, when it is no longer benefitial to society.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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4/5/2011 12:35:46 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education

Depends on the parent. Some can be good, others bad. Just like teachers. Of course a more individualize education is more likely to be better than a group education. However, although home school is more effective then public school, in most cases, there's a third option: private and deregulated schools. These would be more effective then our current system.
Open borders debate:
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Ore_Ele
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4/5/2011 12:40:47 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:35:46 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education

Depends on the parent. Some can be good, others bad. Just like teachers. Of course a more individualize education is more likely to be better than a group education. However, although home school is more effective then public school, in most cases, there's a third option: private and deregulated schools. These would be more effective then our current system.

We could also revamp our current school system (toss our the TU, or greatly strip it down, as part of that revamping), to reduce class sizes (which all studies show improves education), extend class times (so parents can actually work full time jobs, to improve economic situations, which directly tie to educational preformance), and various other options.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
gerrandesquire
Posts: 1,258
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4/5/2011 12:48:52 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

It totally depends. Sometimes, if the parents know what they are doing, the child undoubtedly progresses, but sometimes they may fail to match the pace of the peers if they are not sufficiently motivated. It all depends. HOWever, I feel that in home tutions the mother/ father has to be totally invested in the child and this sometimes hamper their individualistic growth.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended.
It is defended. Parents are free to educate their children.
tkubok
Posts: 5,044
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4/5/2011 1:31:05 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:48:52 PM, gerrandesquire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

It totally depends. Sometimes, if the parents know what they are doing, the child undoubtedly progresses, but sometimes they may fail to match the pace of the peers if they are not sufficiently motivated. It all depends. HOWever, I feel that in home tutions the mother/ father has to be totally invested in the child and this sometimes hamper their individualistic growth.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended.
It is defended. Parents are free to educate their children.

I believe its not permitted if the parent is teaching their child harmful stuff. I remember reading about a mother who homeschooled their children in White supremacy and Nazi stuff, and was burned badly for it....

In any case, rarely are parents ever qualified to teach their child. Not to mention, the child doesnt gain any social abilities.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 1:35:54 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 1:31:05 PM, tkubok wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:48:52 PM, gerrandesquire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

It totally depends. Sometimes, if the parents know what they are doing, the child undoubtedly progresses, but sometimes they may fail to match the pace of the peers if they are not sufficiently motivated. It all depends. HOWever, I feel that in home tutions the mother/ father has to be totally invested in the child and this sometimes hamper their individualistic growth.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended.
It is defended. Parents are free to educate their children.

I believe its not permitted if the parent is teaching their child harmful stuff. I remember reading about a mother who homeschooled their children in White supremacy and Nazi stuff, and was burned badly for it....


In any case, rarely are parents ever qualified to teach their child. Not to mention, the child doesnt gain any social abilities.

I believe that most states have programs that allow homeschooled kids to participate in public school sports.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
gerrandesquire
Posts: 1,258
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4/5/2011 1:56:39 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 1:31:05 PM, tkubok wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:48:52 PM, gerrandesquire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education,

It totally depends. Sometimes, if the parents know what they are doing, the child undoubtedly progresses, but sometimes they may fail to match the pace of the peers if they are not sufficiently motivated. It all depends. HOWever, I feel that in home tutions the mother/ father has to be totally invested in the child and this sometimes hamper their individualistic growth.

and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended.
It is defended. Parents are free to educate their children.

I believe its not permitted if the parent is teaching their child harmful stuff. I remember reading about a mother who homeschooled their children in White supremacy and Nazi stuff, and was burned badly for it....


In any case, rarely are parents ever qualified to teach their child. Not to mention, the child doesnt gain any social abilities.

burnt badly implies criticized or fined/jailed?
Indophile
Posts: 1,414
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4/5/2011 2:19:51 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
Home schooling is the most effective method of education, and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

How will the student experience competition?
You will say that I don't really know you
And it will be true.
LaissezFaire
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4/5/2011 2:29:28 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Homeschoolers score an average of 30+ percentiles points higher than public school students, regardless of family income, how much is spent on homeschooling, whether or not the parents went to college, whether or not either of the parents was a certified teacher, whether the student was male or female, and whether or not the state heavily regulated homeschooling. [1]

They are also more likely to get involved in outside activities such as clubs and sports than government schoolers. [2] And they're more likely to participate in community service (71 vs 37 percent) and more likely to say they are "very happy" with their lives (58.9 vs 27.6 percent). [3]

[1] http://www.hslda.org...

[2] http://www.hslda.org...

[3] Brian D. Ray, Home Educated and Now Adults: Their Community and Civic Involvement, Views About Homeschooling, and Other Traits 2003.
Should we subsidize education?
http://www.debate.org...

http://mises.org...

http://lewrockwell.com...

http://antiwar.com...

: At 6/22/2011 6:57:23 PM, el-badgero wrote:
: i didn't like [Obama]. he was the only black dude in moneygall yet he claimed to be home. obvious liar is obvious liar. i bet him and bin laden are bumfvcking right now.
Reasoning
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4/5/2011 3:01:43 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
It's the only way to live.
"What we really ought to ask the liberal, before we even begin addressing his agenda, is this: In what kind of society would he be a conservative?" - Joseph Sobran
Grape
Posts: 989
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4/5/2011 3:06:53 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 3:01:43 PM, Reasoning wrote:
It's the only way to live.

You underestimate the hilarity of public schools. I had a serious debate today in AP English on the topic of whether Sylvia Plath's suggestion that all men are rapists should be considered offensive.
FREEDO
Posts: 21,057
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4/5/2011 3:17:45 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I was homeschooled. It was pretty effective. Too bad I missed my childhood and was so effected by loneliness that I spiraled into a dark abyss of depression.

I see Democratic Education as the way of the future.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 3:24:43 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 3:06:53 PM, Grape wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:01:43 PM, Reasoning wrote:
It's the only way to live.

You underestimate the hilarity of public schools. I had a serious debate today in AP English on the topic of whether Sylvia Plath's suggestion that all men are rapists should be considered offensive.

please tell me your opponent was some neo-feminist goth.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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4/5/2011 3:25:18 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Mixed opinions. It is good regarding the educational process itself. But, it is clear that what happens with children during school actually shapes them in a lot of ways. A child who gets schooled at home might be social and very smart, but he does not face all the same challenges as the other children. I think it depends heavily on the structure of the home-schooling system. Might be good for some and awful for others. Might be good in one country and awful in another, despite your social status and personal abilities and preferences
Ore_Ele
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4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).

Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
LaissezFaire
Posts: 2,050
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4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?
Should we subsidize education?
http://www.debate.org...

http://mises.org...

http://lewrockwell.com...

http://antiwar.com...

: At 6/22/2011 6:57:23 PM, el-badgero wrote:
: i didn't like [Obama]. he was the only black dude in moneygall yet he claimed to be home. obvious liar is obvious liar. i bet him and bin laden are bumfvcking right now.
Ore_Ele
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4/5/2011 3:45:05 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

That they do, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a wider difference in results based on those two factors, which will only grow over generations.


Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?

because this way is more fun.

I wanted someone to jump on saying "no homeschooling can cost as little as $600 a year!" And post some links to some "let us try to sell you on homeschooling" web-site.

It cost significantly more due to opportunity costs. With the child going to school, the parents (or likely one parent) are free to do other activities to generate revenue.

The only cases in where this opportunity cost is insignificant, is where one parents works for a very decent wage (so that there is no desire for a second wage, a vast minority of the population), or where the parents do not have set work (can work from home, or make money through ownership, also, a vast minority of the population).

Because of these, homeschooling is not for everyone (I'd say is not for most people), and so, cannot really become a wide spread policy.

Homeschooling is like a work-from-home job, like a Mary Kay consultant. Mary Kay likes to tempt people by showing that the average associate makes about $600 a month, perfect for extra income, and some people can make as much as $30,000 a month. What they don't tell you, is that 70% of consultants end up quiting. This is because Mary Kay (like every work from home) tries to convince everyone that it would be great for them, while it is really only good for a few people.

Homeschooling is the same, it is really really good for some people, not good for others. I have two cousins that were homeschooled a bit, my mother's entire family was homeschooled (temporarily), and my wife and I are actually considering homeschooling our daughter when the time comes.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
LaissezFaire
Posts: 2,050
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4/5/2011 4:16:49 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 3:45:05 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

That they do, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a wider difference in results based on those two factors, which will only grow over generations.
Among homeschoolers, the gap for these factors is lower--the white-black gap, for example, narrows to only 5% among homeschooled students.


Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?

because this way is more fun.

I wanted someone to jump on saying "no homeschooling can cost as little as $600 a year!" And post some links to some "let us try to sell you on homeschooling" web-site.

It cost significantly more due to opportunity costs. With the child going to school, the parents (or likely one parent) are free to do other activities to generate revenue.

The only cases in where this opportunity cost is insignificant, is where one parents works for a very decent wage (so that there is no desire for a second wage, a vast minority of the population), or where the parents do not have set work (can work from home, or make money through ownership, also, a vast minority of the population).

Because of these, homeschooling is not for everyone (I'd say is not for most people), and so, cannot really become a wide spread policy.

Homeschooling is like a work-from-home job, like a Mary Kay consultant. Mary Kay likes to tempt people by showing that the average associate makes about $600 a month, perfect for extra income, and some people can make as much as $30,000 a month. What they don't tell you, is that 70% of consultants end up quiting. This is because Mary Kay (like every work from home) tries to convince everyone that it would be great for them, while it is really only good for a few people.

Homeschooling is the same, it is really really good for some people, not good for others. I have two cousins that were homeschooled a bit, my mother's entire family was homeschooled (temporarily), and my wife and I are actually considering homeschooling our daughter when the time comes.

Those opportunity costs aren't actual costs. If the parent would prefer staying home to working, then they gain more in value than they'd get from what they could buy with their money. If they weren't allowed to homeschool, and worked instead, then that would actually be a cost--they'd get more money, but since they'd prefer staying home, they'd lose the difference in the value they'd gain from each option.
Should we subsidize education?
http://www.debate.org...

http://mises.org...

http://lewrockwell.com...

http://antiwar.com...

: At 6/22/2011 6:57:23 PM, el-badgero wrote:
: i didn't like [Obama]. he was the only black dude in moneygall yet he claimed to be home. obvious liar is obvious liar. i bet him and bin laden are bumfvcking right now.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 4:37:43 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 4:16:49 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:45:05 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

That they do, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a wider difference in results based on those two factors, which will only grow over generations.
Among homeschoolers, the gap for these factors is lower--the white-black gap, for example, narrows to only 5% among homeschooled students.


Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?

because this way is more fun.

I wanted someone to jump on saying "no homeschooling can cost as little as $600 a year!" And post some links to some "let us try to sell you on homeschooling" web-site.

It cost significantly more due to opportunity costs. With the child going to school, the parents (or likely one parent) are free to do other activities to generate revenue.

The only cases in where this opportunity cost is insignificant, is where one parents works for a very decent wage (so that there is no desire for a second wage, a vast minority of the population), or where the parents do not have set work (can work from home, or make money through ownership, also, a vast minority of the population).

Because of these, homeschooling is not for everyone (I'd say is not for most people), and so, cannot really become a wide spread policy.

Homeschooling is like a work-from-home job, like a Mary Kay consultant. Mary Kay likes to tempt people by showing that the average associate makes about $600 a month, perfect for extra income, and some people can make as much as $30,000 a month. What they don't tell you, is that 70% of consultants end up quiting. This is because Mary Kay (like every work from home) tries to convince everyone that it would be great for them, while it is really only good for a few people.

Homeschooling is the same, it is really really good for some people, not good for others. I have two cousins that were homeschooled a bit, my mother's entire family was homeschooled (temporarily), and my wife and I are actually considering homeschooling our daughter when the time comes.

Those opportunity costs aren't actual costs. If the parent would prefer staying home to working, then they gain more in value than they'd get from what they could buy with their money. If they weren't allowed to homeschool, and worked instead, then that would actually be a cost--they'd get more money, but since they'd prefer staying home, they'd lose the difference in the value they'd gain from each option.

You are assuming that simply because they choose to do homeschooling that they've logically come to the conclusion that it is more valuable than working. You should know that not everyone is logical, and people do not always make decisions that is really in their best (value) interests.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
LaissezFaire
Posts: 2,050
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4/5/2011 4:45:54 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 4:37:43 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 4:16:49 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:45:05 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

That they do, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a wider difference in results based on those two factors, which will only grow over generations.
Among homeschoolers, the gap for these factors is lower--the white-black gap, for example, narrows to only 5% among homeschooled students.


Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?

because this way is more fun.

I wanted someone to jump on saying "no homeschooling can cost as little as $600 a year!" And post some links to some "let us try to sell you on homeschooling" web-site.

It cost significantly more due to opportunity costs. With the child going to school, the parents (or likely one parent) are free to do other activities to generate revenue.

The only cases in where this opportunity cost is insignificant, is where one parents works for a very decent wage (so that there is no desire for a second wage, a vast minority of the population), or where the parents do not have set work (can work from home, or make money through ownership, also, a vast minority of the population).

Because of these, homeschooling is not for everyone (I'd say is not for most people), and so, cannot really become a wide spread policy.

Homeschooling is like a work-from-home job, like a Mary Kay consultant. Mary Kay likes to tempt people by showing that the average associate makes about $600 a month, perfect for extra income, and some people can make as much as $30,000 a month. What they don't tell you, is that 70% of consultants end up quiting. This is because Mary Kay (like every work from home) tries to convince everyone that it would be great for them, while it is really only good for a few people.

Homeschooling is the same, it is really really good for some people, not good for others. I have two cousins that were homeschooled a bit, my mother's entire family was homeschooled (temporarily), and my wife and I are actually considering homeschooling our daughter when the time comes.

Those opportunity costs aren't actual costs. If the parent would prefer staying home to working, then they gain more in value than they'd get from what they could buy with their money. If they weren't allowed to homeschool, and worked instead, then that would actually be a cost--they'd get more money, but since they'd prefer staying home, they'd lose the difference in the value they'd gain from each option.

You are assuming that simply because they choose to do homeschooling that they've logically come to the conclusion that it is more valuable than working. You should know that not everyone is logical, and people do not always make decisions that is really in their best (value) interests.

People can't not know what's more valuable to themselves personally. There's no "logical" or "illogical" conclusion--there's only how each person subjectively values each option. If someone thinks homeschooling their kids is more valuable than working, then it is.
Should we subsidize education?
http://www.debate.org...

http://mises.org...

http://lewrockwell.com...

http://antiwar.com...

: At 6/22/2011 6:57:23 PM, el-badgero wrote:
: i didn't like [Obama]. he was the only black dude in moneygall yet he claimed to be home. obvious liar is obvious liar. i bet him and bin laden are bumfvcking right now.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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4/5/2011 4:51:12 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 4:45:54 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 4:37:43 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 4:16:49 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:45:05 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

That they do, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a wider difference in results based on those two factors, which will only grow over generations.
Among homeschoolers, the gap for these factors is lower--the white-black gap, for example, narrows to only 5% among homeschooled students.


Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?

because this way is more fun.

I wanted someone to jump on saying "no homeschooling can cost as little as $600 a year!" And post some links to some "let us try to sell you on homeschooling" web-site.

It cost significantly more due to opportunity costs. With the child going to school, the parents (or likely one parent) are free to do other activities to generate revenue.

The only cases in where this opportunity cost is insignificant, is where one parents works for a very decent wage (so that there is no desire for a second wage, a vast minority of the population), or where the parents do not have set work (can work from home, or make money through ownership, also, a vast minority of the population).

Because of these, homeschooling is not for everyone (I'd say is not for most people), and so, cannot really become a wide spread policy.

Homeschooling is like a work-from-home job, like a Mary Kay consultant. Mary Kay likes to tempt people by showing that the average associate makes about $600 a month, perfect for extra income, and some people can make as much as $30,000 a month. What they don't tell you, is that 70% of consultants end up quiting. This is because Mary Kay (like every work from home) tries to convince everyone that it would be great for them, while it is really only good for a few people.

Homeschooling is the same, it is really really good for some people, not good for others. I have two cousins that were homeschooled a bit, my mother's entire family was homeschooled (temporarily), and my wife and I are actually considering homeschooling our daughter when the time comes.

Those opportunity costs aren't actual costs. If the parent would prefer staying home to working, then they gain more in value than they'd get from what they could buy with their money. If they weren't allowed to homeschool, and worked instead, then that would actually be a cost--they'd get more money, but since they'd prefer staying home, they'd lose the difference in the value they'd gain from each option.

You are assuming that simply because they choose to do homeschooling that they've logically come to the conclusion that it is more valuable than working. You should know that not everyone is logical, and people do not always make decisions that is really in their best (value) interests.

People can't not know what's more valuable to themselves personally. There's no "logical" or "illogical" conclusion--there's only how each person subjectively values each option. If someone thinks homeschooling their kids is more valuable than working, then it is.

Not true, beliving something does not make it true.

The same goes for things like my Mary kay example. People are presented with partial facts that make it look better than it really is, getting people to believe that it is the best option for them, when in reality, it harms more of its agents than helps (even though the average is...). When people make judgements based off of sales pitches and partial information, then they are not making decisions accurately based on what is best for them.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
LaissezFaire
Posts: 2,050
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4/5/2011 4:56:00 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 4:51:12 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 4:45:54 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 4:37:43 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 4:16:49 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:45:05 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:32:23 PM, LaissezFaire wrote:
At 4/5/2011 3:30:16 PM, OreEle wrote:
Home schooling also shows a greater difference in education between rich and poor, and the college educated and no-college (those were the two largest factors in the success of homeschooling).
Except homeschoolers do better than government schoolers regardless of either of those things.

That they do, but that doesn't change the fact that there is a wider difference in results based on those two factors, which will only grow over generations.
Among homeschoolers, the gap for these factors is lower--the white-black gap, for example, narrows to only 5% among homeschooled students.


Not to mention that homeschooling costs significantly more than current public education (which should be reformed anyway), in upwards of 30% more.

Yes, I'm waiting for someone to bite on that last remark.

Why wouldn't you just explain that comment properly in this post, instead of waiting for someone to respond?

because this way is more fun.

I wanted someone to jump on saying "no homeschooling can cost as little as $600 a year!" And post some links to some "let us try to sell you on homeschooling" web-site.

It cost significantly more due to opportunity costs. With the child going to school, the parents (or likely one parent) are free to do other activities to generate revenue.

The only cases in where this opportunity cost is insignificant, is where one parents works for a very decent wage (so that there is no desire for a second wage, a vast minority of the population), or where the parents do not have set work (can work from home, or make money through ownership, also, a vast minority of the population).

Because of these, homeschooling is not for everyone (I'd say is not for most people), and so, cannot really become a wide spread policy.

Homeschooling is like a work-from-home job, like a Mary Kay consultant. Mary Kay likes to tempt people by showing that the average associate makes about $600 a month, perfect for extra income, and some people can make as much as $30,000 a month. What they don't tell you, is that 70% of consultants end up quiting. This is because Mary Kay (like every work from home) tries to convince everyone that it would be great for them, while it is really only good for a few people.

Homeschooling is the same, it is really really good for some people, not good for others. I have two cousins that were homeschooled a bit, my mother's entire family was homeschooled (temporarily), and my wife and I are actually considering homeschooling our daughter when the time comes.

Those opportunity costs aren't actual costs. If the parent would prefer staying home to working, then they gain more in value than they'd get from what they could buy with their money. If they weren't allowed to homeschool, and worked instead, then that would actually be a cost--they'd get more money, but since they'd prefer staying home, they'd lose the difference in the value they'd gain from each option.

You are assuming that simply because they choose to do homeschooling that they've logically come to the conclusion that it is more valuable than working. You should know that not everyone is logical, and people do not always make decisions that is really in their best (value) interests.

People can't not know what's more valuable to themselves personally. There's no "logical" or "illogical" conclusion--there's only how each person subjectively values each option. If someone thinks homeschooling their kids is more valuable than working, then it is.

Not true, beliving something does not make it true.

The same goes for things like my Mary kay example. People are presented with partial facts that make it look better than it really is, getting people to believe that it is the best option for them, when in reality, it harms more of its agents than helps (even though the average is...). When people make judgements based off of sales pitches and partial information, then they are not making decisions accurately based on what is best for them.

Then those people valued the chance that Mary Kay would work over the disvalue of the chances that it wouldn't work. It's like gambling--even if I'll most likely lose money over the long run, I still might value the chance that I'll win big over those probable losses.
Should we subsidize education?
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: At 6/22/2011 6:57:23 PM, el-badgero wrote:
: i didn't like [Obama]. he was the only black dude in moneygall yet he claimed to be home. obvious liar is obvious liar. i bet him and bin laden are bumfvcking right now.
Koopin
Posts: 12,090
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4/5/2011 5:19:33 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
For a complete 4 years of homeschooling (high school level) through a credited program it cost my family $1250. Also, the program I go through is one of the top homeschooling programs.
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Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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4/5/2011 6:40:18 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 4/5/2011 12:11:57 PM, JrRepublican wrote:
and the freedom of parents to educate their children how they want should be defended

What about the freedom of children to say "Hell no?"
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
phantom
Posts: 6,774
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4/6/2011 1:23:50 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I recommended going joining a co-op to any home schooler.
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