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SAT 1-Reading Comprehension and Math

Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I am interested in your views on the issue of whether or not the SAT is a reliable way of predicting a student's success/future experience in colleges and universities. Please answer, at least in one post or more, the following questions:

Is the current SAT a good predictor of a student's success in college?
What aspect of college education does the SAT emphasize?
Is its current form (Writing, Reading Comprehension, and Mathematics) an accurate way of determining one's "aptitude"?
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?
Does the SAT show prejudice to members of the minorities? (Certain studies have shown, though I do not know if they are valid)...
And lastly, how was your experience studying for the SAT (I/and II) like?
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"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
LeafRod
Posts: 1,548
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7/20/2011 12:07:49 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Is the current SAT a good predictor of a student's success in college? Not really

What aspect of college education does the SAT emphasize? I don't really know; I might say basic intelligence or something but I try to refrain from such categorizations. Someone with a better SAT score might comprehend something more quickly but not only are there many exceptions, since such a thing is heavily dependent on other factors, but quick comprehension isn't even that important all the time.

Is its current form (Writing, Reading Comprehension, and Mathematics) an accurate way of determining one's "aptitude"?
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT? The current form is fine for what it's trying to do, but people overestimate what it does. It can't really be improved, but people should stop placing so much importance on it.

Does the SAT show prejudice to members of the minorities? (Certain studies have shown, though I do not know if they are valid)... No. Minorities might do worse or whatever but that hasn't anything to do with the test intrinsically. It used to be that way, with similes and those sorts of questions, but not anymore.

And lastly, how was your experience studying for the SAT (I/and II) like? Enjoyable, the way I did it.
wjmelements
Posts: 8,206
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7/20/2011 3:19:41 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Judging aptitude in general is difficult, but I think the SAT does a good job measuring problem-solving skills in the Math section and critical thinking skills in the Reading. I don't think the writing section is necessary; too much of it is focused on grammar, which I believe is a measure of a learned skill rather than aptitude.
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freedomsquared
Posts: 450
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7/20/2011 4:03:37 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM, Man-is-good wrote:

Is the current SAT a good predictor of a student's success in college?
In a general sense, yes, I think so. However, there will always be outside cases and it also depends on what type of "success" you want in college.
What aspect of college education does the SAT emphasize?
I think it stresses the basics, because in my experience I never had to learn anything specific for the test, just what we were taught in class already.
Is its current form (Writing, Reading Comprehension, and Mathematics) an accurate way of determining one's "aptitude"?
In a general sense...
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?
Science is a possibility, much like the ACT. However, science is a much more specific subject and would make the test unfair (as there are multiple different science classes one can take and you can't take them all).
Does the SAT show prejudice to members of the minorities? (Certain studies have shown, though I do not know if they are valid)...
I'm not honestly sure, I don't think it does.
And lastly, how was your experience studying for the SAT (I/and II) like?
I never studied, as I believe it is general knowledge that can't really be studied for. Just be prepared to take it multiple times, your score should improve as you learn the format better and understand the types of questions.
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Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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7/20/2011 4:21:31 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
I am interested in your views on the issue of whether or not the SAT is a reliable way of predicting a student's success/future experience in colleges and universities. Please answer, at least in one post or more, the following questions:

Is the current SAT a good predictor of a student's success in college?

Yes and no. There is no real single "accurate" test. But as a piece of information to be included with other pieces of info (like AP examines, letters of recommendation, college classes, etc), it can be helpful. But on its own, it isn't worth much more than a random guess.

What aspect of college education does the SAT emphasize?

None, it is suppose to measure what you've learned in HS to suggest where you might start in college (a low Math score indicates that you haven't learned too much in math, or that you have difficulties in math, so a math school is not likely to accept you).

Is its current form (Writing, Reading Comprehension, and Mathematics) an accurate way of determining one's "aptitude"?

Logic tests would be better, but logic tests should not really be on a strict timed basis. I've always prefered essay questions and show your work questions, rather than multiple choice. But with those, they can only really ask a few questions, rather than a few hunderd.

Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?

Yes and no. They should be implimented, but in seperate test, not into one massive test.

Does the SAT show prejudice to members of the minorities? (Certain studies have shown, though I do not know if they are valid)...

No, studies have shown a correlation, not a causation. And any real difference is not likely a fault of the test, but a fault of the schools and parents that should have been driving and helping the kids from pre-school.

And lastly, how was your experience studying for the SAT (I/and II) like?

I think I had an orgasm while doing the math section. That sh!t was easier than 14 year old Japanese girl with naughty step father!
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mongeese
Posts: 5,387
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7/20/2011 4:49:36 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/20/2011 4:21:31 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?

Yes and no. They should be implimented, but in seperate test, not into one massive test.

That would be the SAT II: multiple tests each concerning a different subject ranging from Chemistry to U.S. History to Spanish.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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7/20/2011 4:53:57 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/20/2011 4:49:36 PM, mongeese wrote:
At 7/20/2011 4:21:31 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?

Yes and no. They should be implimented, but in seperate test, not into one massive test.

That would be the SAT II: multiple tests each concerning a different subject ranging from Chemistry to U.S. History to Spanish.

Yes, but it still doesn't do it like I would like, the APs are closer to an ideal form.
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mongeese
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7/20/2011 4:56:06 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/20/2011 4:53:57 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 7/20/2011 4:49:36 PM, mongeese wrote:
At 7/20/2011 4:21:31 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?

Yes and no. They should be implimented, but in seperate test, not into one massive test.

That would be the SAT II: multiple tests each concerning a different subject ranging from Chemistry to U.S. History to Spanish.

Yes, but it still doesn't do it like I would like, the APs are closer to an ideal form.

There isn't really much of a difference between the AP and SAT II tests for Chemistry and US History, except for the inclusion of a free response section in the AP tests.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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7/20/2011 4:57:01 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/20/2011 4:56:06 PM, mongeese wrote:
At 7/20/2011 4:53:57 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 7/20/2011 4:49:36 PM, mongeese wrote:
At 7/20/2011 4:21:31 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 7/20/2011 10:56:23 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
Should other subjects be implemented into the SAT?

Yes and no. They should be implimented, but in seperate test, not into one massive test.

That would be the SAT II: multiple tests each concerning a different subject ranging from Chemistry to U.S. History to Spanish.

Yes, but it still doesn't do it like I would like, the APs are closer to an ideal form.

There isn't really much of a difference between the AP and SAT II tests for Chemistry and US History, except for the inclusion of a free response section in the AP tests.

oh, the only SAT II that I took was math, and it didn't seem very different to me, so I stuck with AP test for most of my stuff.
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Joy
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7/23/2011 8:01:18 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
The SAT 1 test aptitude. Achievment test, test the same thing as the SAT and are free for students.

Unfortunately students of a higher class tend to score higher. A child whose family makes over $10,000 annually averages scores from 400-700 while a student whose family income is above $10,000 tends to cores in the 900-1500 range. Obvious reasons like a families ability to pay for prep classes come to consideration. The SAT isn't a very fair test.
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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7/23/2011 8:07:47 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/23/2011 8:01:18 PM, Joy wrote:
The SAT 1 test aptitude. Achievment test, test the same thing as the SAT and are free for students.

Unfortunately students of a higher class tend to score higher. A child whose family makes over $10,000 annually averages scores from 400-700 while a student whose family income is above $10,000 tends to cores in the 900-1500 range.

From a skeptical viewpoint, one can easily point out other factors that might be deciding agents in this situation. It appears that you are asserting that "students of a higher class" tend to score higher, due to their wealth...Does any study conclusively show this, even despite refutations and accusations of subjectivity?

Obvious reasons like a families ability to pay for prep classes come to consideration.
Those reasons are not as obvious to the actual modules and faculties tested and emphasized by the test. An advantage to SAT preparatory exercises is a somewhat official deciding factor, but does not conclusively show the link/correlation between wealth and good scores on the SAT...

The SAT isn't a very fair test.
To certain members of the minorities, and poor classes, it is. But to the general public, the SAT is still upheld as a great determinant for one's success in college. However, I believe other methods to be more satisfactory determinants or mediums than the SAT...I will be happy to divulge such methods if you wish.

And by the way, welcome to this site! I hope you find DDO a great site for you.
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau