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Symbolism of the Green Knight

Man-is-good
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8/14/2011 2:14:03 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
The Green Knight in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight' appears to be an enigmatic figure. Although he is revealed to be Bertilak de Hautdesert,, the lord of the castle, the Green Knight however appears to symbolize a number of causes, all depending on the implications of the color 'green' and his role, as a motivating/moral agent, in the story.

What do you think the Green knight represents? Please support your views with textual evidence from the poem...
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
Man-is-good
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8/17/2011 10:49:07 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/16/2011 7:23:20 PM, Wnope wrote:
I thought this was going to be some joke about Batman smoking weed.

Nope. It's about a medieval poem written by the anonymous Pearl Poet. Here's a description of it from an article in Wikipedia:

"Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a late 14th-century Middle English alliterative romance outlining an adventure of Sir Gawain, a knight of King Arthur's Round Table. In the poem, Sir Gawain accepts a challenge from a mysterious warrior who is completely green, from his clothes and hair to his beard and skin, save for his red eyes. The "Green Knight" offers to allow anyone to strike him with his axe if the challenger will take a return blow in a year and a day. Gawain accepts, and beheads him in one blow, only to have the Green Knight stand up, pick up his head, and remind Gawain to meet him at the appointed time. In his struggles to uphold his oath, Gawain faithfully demonstrates the qualities of chivalry and loyalty until his honor is called into question by a test crafted by the lady of the castle in which much of the story takes place. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is one of the better-known Arthurian stories, which date back to the 12th century."

http://en.wikipedia.org...
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
mattrodstrom
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8/23/2011 5:39:04 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
from what I remember.. Shields are rather important...

that's all I got.
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/25/2011 7:38:27 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
As I understand it the Green Knight represents the internal moral challenge of a Knight.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
Man-is-good
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8/25/2011 3:53:21 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/25/2011 7:38:27 AM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
As I understand it the Green Knight represents the internal moral challenge of a Knight.

He might...since the entire narrative poem is focused on Gawain's challenge to adhere to the set date, and to muster courage to face the knight with the holly oak in one hand and the axe in the other.
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau