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A Report of American Textbook Council 2004

Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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11/23/2011 4:27:09 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
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The thread has been moved to the education forum.....I have decided that this is more appropriate for the topic....
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
Logic_on_rails
Posts: 2,445
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11/25/2011 1:03:07 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Reposting what I said in the miscellaneous version of this thread in case you missed it in the thread changeover MIG:

MIG, I can't really update pictures of my history textbook without clarification. I do Aust. History (mandatory; not a world history textbook but does encompass a little world history) and history elective (more like world history, but I don't possess a textbook for the subject) . In years 7 and 8 the study of ancient and medieval societies occurs. In years 11 and 12 history is purely an elective - choices include ancient history, modern history and history extension 1 and 2 . As a year 9 student I don't have access to these textbooks for years 11 and 12. Note: I'm in the NSW education system.

On political influences, 3 of the optional topics (chapters) in my Aust. His. textbook revolve around a key political figure of each of the 3 main political parties currently in Australia. Furthermore, Indigenous culture is occasionally praised in my science textbook for some of their 'useful inventions' , which don't hold a candle to the advancement of European and Asian societies, the 2 main powers over the course of history. Of course, we agree on the point of political influences.

Narrative flow is certainly quite poor, partially due to the teaching of unrelated topics (back to our interest groups) with no coherence. Furthermore, the lack of flow showcases a lack of depth and understanding that should be passed onto students.

Also, on simplification of content (picture book and so forth), this might be highlighted by the difference between year 11 and 12 textbooks and prior years textbooks (in my state you can leave school following year 10 (minus some technicalities)) . For example, my commerce textbook is supposed to cover years 9 and 10, yet given the time allocation for it vs. economics textbook (years 11 and 12) and through content amount (some estimation on my part) , I deduced that the commerce textbook had about 7 times less content per time unit! Simplification?

On the approach point, I'll have to think on it to come up with a good answer. Suffice to say that a restoration of flow, coherence, and less pandering to interest groups, along with the teaching of ideas and concepts (versus trivia) would be a good start.
"Tis not in mortals to command success
But we"ll do more, Sempronius, we"ll deserve it
logicrules
Posts: 1,721
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12/8/2011 11:10:58 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
The thread has been moved to the education forum.....I have decided that this is more appropriate for the topic....

The report, almost a decade old, attempts to point out what we already know, and seems to hoe it will change things. It has not. Education in the west is all about feeling good, and has nothing to do with knowledge. There is no concept of Right and Wrong, there is only sociological conformity. This has now extended into society as a whole to such an extent that hurting another s feelings is called hating.