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vbaculum
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9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I've recently begun studying artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning and data mining algorithms but I plan on expanding into other areas as well (like computer vision and natural language processing).

One thing that in very clear is that to understand this field, one needs to understand math, particularly statistics and to a lesser extent linear algebra (this is what I've gathered so far anyway).

I'm a fish out of water here; I haven't studied math in almost 20 years. So my plan is to start over at algebra 1 then moving on to geometry, trig, algebra 2, calculus then statistics. (I suppose linear algebra should fit in there somewhere.)

My syllabus looks like this because I don't know anything about college level math; I just constructed it based on my high school math education. But I think if I can learn these maths, I will be ready to understand the machine leaning algorithms that have befuddled me so far.

I would also like to use my new math education to study chemistry, physics and neurophysiology as well at some point.

So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

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Mirza
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9/4/2012 2:08:12 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM, vbaculum wrote:
So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.
Absolutely. If you're motivated, why would it be a wrong way? Just make sure you understand the books you read. If you find some levels difficult, then it is a good idea to start from even some high school grades (or elementary, but I guess you can handle that) and freshen up your knowledge, and gradually move on to college level books.
OllerupMand
Posts: 375
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9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
It is hard to say that much because I can't know what is under statements such as algebra 1 and algebra 2, nor how much or how complicated you want it to be.

As an example you have no need for linary algebra if you only want to do easy geometry, but you need it for complicated geometry.

Also how are you going to learn it? Because real math is pretty damn hard to learn on your own. It often requires some kind of revelation before one can go on to the next level, so to speak and it is hard to know if your there if you have no one else to turn to.

A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way. If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

Highschool all over again
Then go:
Calculus, algebra 1, linear algebra, algebra 2, geometri and statistics.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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9/4/2012 2:23:59 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:08:12 PM, Mirza wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM, vbaculum wrote:
So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.
Absolutely. If you're motivated, why would it be a wrong way? Just make sure you understand the books you read. If you find some levels difficult, then it is a good idea to start from even some high school grades (or elementary, but I guess you can handle that) and freshen up your knowledge, and gradually move on to college level books.

I don't know what college level math consists of (except for statistics) or if I need a lot of college level math, anyway.

Also, I'm not entirely sure that I need all that high school math for a field that is mostly statistical (apparently).

The book I got on algebra 1 is a high school text book targeted at a 7th grade audience. I wonder if there are any algebra books for adults LOL.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

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vbaculum
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9/4/2012 2:24:51 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:05:57 PM, darkkermit wrote:
kahn math academy is pretty good.

Thanks, I check them out. I already looked at statistics courses at Udacity.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

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Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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9/4/2012 2:34:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:23:59 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:08:12 PM, Mirza wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM, vbaculum wrote:
So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.
Absolutely. If you're motivated, why would it be a wrong way? Just make sure you understand the books you read. If you find some levels difficult, then it is a good idea to start from even some high school grades (or elementary, but I guess you can handle that) and freshen up your knowledge, and gradually move on to college level books.

I don't know what college level math consists of (except for statistics) or if I need a lot of college level math, anyway.

Also, I'm not entirely sure that I need all that high school math for a field that is mostly statistical (apparently).

The book I got on algebra 1 is a high school text book targeted at a 7th grade audience. I wonder if there are any algebra books for adults LOL.

A bit of specific input here: http://www.amazon.com...

This is at least a textbook designated to college students, so it may be of the level that you wish to entertain.
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
vbaculum
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9/4/2012 2:37:42 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
It is hard to say that much because I can't know what is under statements such as algebra 1 and algebra 2, nor how much or how complicated you want it to be.

As an example you have no need for linary algebra if you only want to do easy geometry, but you need it for complicated geometry.

I really just need linear algebra and statistics for the AI stuff. I assume these are largely based on other maths like algebra.


Also how are you going to learn it? Because real math is pretty damn hard to learn on your own. It often requires some kind of revelation before one can go on to the next level, so to speak and it is hard to know if your there if you have no one else to turn to.

Yeah, not sure about that. I'll have to see. I taught myself computer programming which was pretty easy for me. Then again, I really liked it. I've never really have cared much for math.


A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way.

Ouch. Hopefully I can just remember what I've read. I hate doing exercise and stuff. LOL.

If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

Highschool all over again
Then go:
Calculus, algebra 1, linear algebra, algebra 2, geometri and statistics.

Hmm. Seems out of order. In American high schools (as I remember) we first learn algebra 1, geometry is the second. Calculus is the last thing to learn.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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9/4/2012 2:40:48 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:34:10 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:23:59 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:08:12 PM, Mirza wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM, vbaculum wrote:
So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.
Absolutely. If you're motivated, why would it be a wrong way? Just make sure you understand the books you read. If you find some levels difficult, then it is a good idea to start from even some high school grades (or elementary, but I guess you can handle that) and freshen up your knowledge, and gradually move on to college level books.

I don't know what college level math consists of (except for statistics) or if I need a lot of college level math, anyway.

Also, I'm not entirely sure that I need all that high school math for a field that is mostly statistical (apparently).

The book I got on algebra 1 is a high school text book targeted at a 7th grade audience. I wonder if there are any algebra books for adults LOL.

A bit of specific input here: http://www.amazon.com...

This is at least a textbook designated to college students, so it may be of the level that you wish to entertain.

Hey that looks pretty good. If my current text turns out to be too slow, I check this one out.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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9/4/2012 2:55:34 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way. If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

This...Note that working..."with your hands"--learning to understand, recognize familiar scenarios involving similar characteristics that one can easily solve for, and re-working at it helps immensely in understanding some of the more subtle points and lessons. I found that by doing over, and even explaining, a few probability questions, I was at least able to glean multiple insights: when to utilize permutations and combinations based on the specific scenario in a probability, for example.

It helped immensely for the upcoming examination. (I should keep that principle in mind during my next math class this year.)
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
OllerupMand
Posts: 375
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9/4/2012 3:18:49 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:37:42 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
It is hard to say that much because I can't know what is under statements such as algebra 1 and algebra 2, nor how much or how complicated you want it to be.

As an example you have no need for linary algebra if you only want to do easy geometry, but you need it for complicated geometry.

I really just need linear algebra and statistics for the AI stuff. I assume these are largely based on other maths like algebra.

Also how are you going to learn it? Because real math is pretty damn hard to learn on your own. It often requires some kind of revelation before one can go on to the next level, so to speak and it is hard to know if your there if you have no one else to turn to.

Yeah, not sure about that. I'll have to see. I taught myself computer programming which was pretty easy for me. Then again, I really liked it. I've never really have cared much for math.


A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way.

Ouch. Hopefully I can just remember what I've read. I hate doing exercise and stuff. LOL.

If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

Highschool all over again
Then go:
Calculus, algebra 1, linear algebra, algebra 2, geometri and statistics.

Hmm. Seems out of order. In American high schools (as I remember) we first learn algebra 1, geometry is the second. Calculus is the last thing to learn.

Yah, but I guessed that you wanted to take it on a level higher than highschool. Guessing from what you write you don't just want highschool algebra. You want at least some level of abstract algebra(because it works wonders when you need to understand algorithms) and then I guessed that you wanted the rest to be about the same level, but I can see here that I was wrong. I'm simply thinking a couple of levels over what you really need.

Spelled out a little better my idea was something like:
First you redo highschool
Calculus (Concepts and contexts by James Stewart is a good book for level estimation)
Algebra and number theory (Not that important, but will make some of the next easier)
Linear Algebra (Fraleigh and Beauregard have made an excelent book and it is one of the few American books I can recommend when we talk about math)
Abstract Algebra (Niels Lauritzen have made a rather brilliant book called concrete abstract algebra)
Differential Geometry (I only know terrible bad books when it comes to differential Geometry, but the lesser evil would be Do Carmos: Differential Geometry of curves and surfaces)

But honestly if you can remember your basic triometry and have such specific goals, then you can just start of with Linear Algebra and Abstract Geometry and then move on to statistics.
OllerupMand
Posts: 375
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9/4/2012 3:41:09 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way.

Ouch. Hopefully I can just remember what I've read. I hate doing exercise and stuff. LOL.

You properly didn't learn programming by just reading about it ;) Same with maths!
Funny story. I have a major in math and side in statistics and I'm currently relearning my programming so I can make better robots in my spare time ;)
vbaculum
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9/4/2012 4:22:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:55:34 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way. If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

This...Note that working..."with your hands"--learning to understand, recognize familiar scenarios involving similar characteristics that one can easily solve for, and re-working at it helps immensely in understanding some of the more subtle points and lessons. I found that by doing over, and even explaining, a few probability questions, I was at least able to glean multiple insights: when to utilize permutations and combinations based on the specific scenario in a probability, for example.

It helped immensely for the upcoming examination. (I should keep that principle in mind during my next math class this year.)

I'll keep it in mind :)
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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9/4/2012 4:29:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 3:18:49 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:37:42 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
It is hard to say that much because I can't know what is under statements such as algebra 1 and algebra 2, nor how much or how complicated you want it to be.

As an example you have no need for linary algebra if you only want to do easy geometry, but you need it for complicated geometry.

I really just need linear algebra and statistics for the AI stuff. I assume these are largely based on other maths like algebra.

Also how are you going to learn it? Because real math is pretty damn hard to learn on your own. It often requires some kind of revelation before one can go on to the next level, so to speak and it is hard to know if your there if you have no one else to turn to.

Yeah, not sure about that. I'll have to see. I taught myself computer programming which was pretty easy for me. Then again, I really liked it. I've never really have cared much for math.


A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way.

Ouch. Hopefully I can just remember what I've read. I hate doing exercise and stuff. LOL.

If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

Highschool all over again
Then go:
Calculus, algebra 1, linear algebra, algebra 2, geometri and statistics.

Hmm. Seems out of order. In American high schools (as I remember) we first learn algebra 1, geometry is the second. Calculus is the last thing to learn.

Yah, but I guessed that you wanted to take it on a level higher than highschool. Guessing from what you write you don't just want highschool algebra. You want at least some level of abstract algebra(because it works wonders when you need to understand algorithms) and then I guessed that you wanted the rest to be about the same level, but I can see here that I was wrong. I'm simply thinking a couple of levels over what you really need.

Spelled out a little better my idea was something like:
First you redo highschool
Calculus (Concepts and contexts by James Stewart is a good book for level estimation)
Algebra and number theory (Not that important, but will make some of the next easier)
Linear Algebra (Fraleigh and Beauregard have made an excelent book and it is one of the few American books I can recommend when we talk about math)
Abstract Algebra (Niels Lauritzen have made a rather brilliant book called concrete abstract algebra)
Differential Geometry (I only know terrible bad books when it comes to differential Geometry, but the lesser evil would be Do Carmos: Differential Geometry of curves and surfaces)

But honestly if you can remember your basic triometry and have such specific goals, then you can just start of with Linear Algebra and Abstract Geometry and then move on to statistics.

Sounds like good stuff. I'll keep this page bookmarked so, after I've learned more, I can determine if these subjects will be useful.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
OllerupMand
Posts: 375
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9/4/2012 4:37:36 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 3:18:49 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:37:42 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:20:16 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
It is hard to say that much because I can't know what is under statements such as algebra 1 and algebra 2, nor how much or how complicated you want it to be.

As an example you have no need for linary algebra if you only want to do easy geometry, but you need it for complicated geometry.

I really just need linear algebra and statistics for the AI stuff. I assume these are largely based on other maths like algebra.

Also how are you going to learn it? Because real math is pretty damn hard to learn on your own. It often requires some kind of revelation before one can go on to the next level, so to speak and it is hard to know if your there if you have no one else to turn to.

Yeah, not sure about that. I'll have to see. I taught myself computer programming which was pretty easy for me. Then again, I really liked it. I've never really have cared much for math.


A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way.

Ouch. Hopefully I can just remember what I've read. I hate doing exercise and stuff. LOL.

If I where to relearn my math it would be something like this:

Highschool all over again
Then go:
Calculus, algebra 1, linear algebra, algebra 2, geometri and statistics.

Hmm. Seems out of order. In American high schools (as I remember) we first learn algebra 1, geometry is the second. Calculus is the last thing to learn.

Yah, but I guessed that you wanted to take it on a level higher than highschool. Guessing from what you write you don't just want highschool algebra. You want at least some level of abstract algebra(because it works wonders when you need to understand algorithms) and then I guessed that you wanted the rest to be about the same level, but I can see here that I was wrong. I'm simply thinking a couple of levels over what you really need.

Spelled out a little better my idea was something like:
First you redo highschool
Calculus (Concepts and contexts by James Stewart is a good book for level estimation)
Algebra and number theory (Not that important, but will make some of the next easier)
Linear Algebra (Fraleigh and Beauregard have made an excelent book and it is one of the few American books I can recommend when we talk about math)
Abstract Algebra (Niels Lauritzen have made a rather brilliant book called concrete abstract algebra)
Differential Geometry (I only know terrible bad books when it comes to differential Geometry, but the lesser evil would be Do Carmos: Differential Geometry of curves and surfaces)

But honestly if you can remember your basic triometry and have such specific goals, then you can just start of with Linear Algebra and Abstract Algebra and then move on to statistics.

Fixed!

I meant Abstract Algebra, not geometry
vbaculum
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9/4/2012 4:37:48 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 3:41:09 PM, OllerupMand wrote:
A last advice about math. Remember you don't learn math with your eyes, but with your hand. Do lots and lots of exercises on your way.

Ouch. Hopefully I can just remember what I've read. I hate doing exercise and stuff. LOL.

You properly didn't learn programming by just reading about it ;) Same with maths!

Your right, I didn't. I would read an entire book on a language and them write a program in that language, using the book as a reference. That way I was able to have fun programming and I could commit the material to memory.

That's the thing though: programming is fun because you can invent things and see results of your efforts in the output of your software. But with math, it seems like the only way to use it, at least in the learning stage, is to do the exercises. Not nearly as fun as creating software. But I guess this is an old problem with no easy solution. Oh well.

Funny story. I have a major in math and side in statistics and I'm currently relearning my programming so I can make better robots in my spare time ;)

Sounds fun. I'd like to get into robotics some day as well.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Ren
Posts: 7,102
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9/4/2012 6:39:06 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM, vbaculum wrote:
I've recently begun studying artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning and data mining algorithms but I plan on expanding into other areas as well (like computer vision and natural language processing).

One thing that in very clear is that to understand this field, one needs to understand math, particularly statistics and to a lesser extent linear algebra (this is what I've gathered so far anyway).

I'm a fish out of water here; I haven't studied math in almost 20 years. So my plan is to start over at algebra 1 then moving on to geometry, trig, algebra 2, calculus then statistics. (I suppose linear algebra should fit in there somewhere.)

My syllabus looks like this because I don't know anything about college level math; I just constructed it based on my high school math education. But I think if I can learn these maths, I will be ready to understand the machine leaning algorithms that have befuddled me so far.

I would also like to use my new math education to study chemistry, physics and neurophysiology as well at some point.

So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.

Well, that sounds very much like something that happened with me. I became extremely curious about science and physics specifically, and wanted to better understand explanations regarding it. There's three ways you can go about it, and I personally subscribed to two.

The first is to do literally what you've just indicated. However, that would take up a lot of free time that will ultimately lead to a certain goal, but that won't directly interest you in the same way as that goal. In that regard, it holds a high likelihood of becoming terribly uninteresting. I personally did not go this route.

The second possibility is to start tutoring in the subjects. You know, with all given materials, it becomes a lot easier to relearn everything yourself while trying to teach someone else who is struggling with the concepts. By patiently taking your time and slowly providing them with the guidance they need, you will gain much more insight to the concepts as well. I personally did this. I made a concerted effort to somehow make money from engaging rudimentary subjects like Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Calculus, usually tutoring students in libraries or in their homes. Subsequently, I learned enough about mathematics in general that I could have a fair understanding of the more in-depth journal articles and studies that I would come across.

Finally, there's the backward approach. Somehow attain other sources of knowledge until you have a reliable cache of mathematical information and explanations, then dive right into your subjects of interest, but with the intention of spending forever on every little concept. Really mulling over every little section to try and glean the meaning of what's being stated. Getting through one article can take me an entire Saturday sometimes. There are concepts I still haven't figured out. But, overall, it's an edifying experience.
vbaculum
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9/4/2012 8:04:44 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 6:39:06 PM, Ren wrote:
At 9/4/2012 2:01:32 PM, vbaculum wrote:
I've recently begun studying artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning and data mining algorithms but I plan on expanding into other areas as well (like computer vision and natural language processing).

One thing that in very clear is that to understand this field, one needs to understand math, particularly statistics and to a lesser extent linear algebra (this is what I've gathered so far anyway).

I'm a fish out of water here; I haven't studied math in almost 20 years. So my plan is to start over at algebra 1 then moving on to geometry, trig, algebra 2, calculus then statistics. (I suppose linear algebra should fit in there somewhere.)

My syllabus looks like this because I don't know anything about college level math; I just constructed it based on my high school math education. But I think if I can learn these maths, I will be ready to understand the machine leaning algorithms that have befuddled me so far.

I would also like to use my new math education to study chemistry, physics and neurophysiology as well at some point.

So does anyone have any advice regarding my endeavour? In other words, is this the right way to learn math? Thanks.

Well, that sounds very much like something that happened with me. I became extremely curious about science and physics specifically, and wanted to better understand explanations regarding it. There's three ways you can go about it, and I personally subscribed to two.

The first is to do literally what you've just indicated. However, that would take up a lot of free time that will ultimately lead to a certain goal, but that won't directly interest you in the same way as that goal. In that regard, it holds a high likelihood of becoming terribly uninteresting. I personally did not go this route.

Yes, I don't know how long I can maintain an interests in these subjects.

The second possibility is to start tutoring in the subjects. You know, with all given materials, it becomes a lot easier to relearn everything yourself while trying to teach someone else who is struggling with the concepts. By patiently taking your time and slowly providing them with the guidance they need, you will gain much more insight to the concepts as well. I personally did this. I made a concerted effort to somehow make money from engaging rudimentary subjects like Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Calculus, usually tutoring students in libraries or in their homes. Subsequently, I learned enough about mathematics in general that I could have a fair understanding of the more in-depth journal articles and studies that I would come across.

That sounds pretty cool. Like I said before, I like to apply the knowledge I learn in useful ways instead of just doing exercises at the end of the chapter. I suppose I could use craigslist to find tutoring gigs. I wonder how much a tutor can make.

Finally, there's the backward approach. Somehow attain other sources of knowledge until you have a reliable cache of mathematical information and explanations, then dive right into your subjects of interest, but with the intention of spending forever on every little concept. Really mulling over every little section to try and glean the meaning of what's being stated. Getting through one article can take me an entire Saturday sometimes. There are concepts I still haven't figured out. But, overall, it's an edifying experience.

Yeah that probably wouldn't work for me. I like to learn first-things-first. I'm not comfortable in environments with a lot of unknowns.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Ren
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9/6/2012 7:28:15 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/4/2012 8:04:44 PM, vbaculum wrote:

Yes, I don't know how long I can maintain an interests in these subjects.

Yeah, it can get a little mundane, and just enough to fall secondary to a thousand other little things that consume our days.

That sounds pretty cool. Like I said before, I like to apply the knowledge I learn in useful ways instead of just doing exercises at the end of the chapter. I suppose I could use craigslist to find tutoring gigs. I wonder how much a tutor can make.

Tutors can actually make a decent amount of money, and almost always on non-business or weekend hours. If you're down for such a thing, it really isn't bad at all. Tutors start at $20/hr. $40/hr is typical.

Yeah that probably wouldn't work for me. I like to learn first-things-first. I'm not comfortable in environments with a lot of unknowns.

That's interesting... well, for what you're trying to do, you're bound to come across something you're not familiar with, unless you intend to study Math literally for years. It is a complicated and in-depth subject in its more complex manifestations. You'll encounter something written in an unfamiliar notation in a heartbeat, for example, and you'll have to be willing to delve right into it and try to figure out what it's saying, like a translator or cryptographer.

Happens to me all the time, but the subjects I engage are indeed pretty different.

On a side-note, though, if you're already pretty familiar with Statistics, you shouldn't really have a problem with rudimentary math. Stats is pretty complicated, and borrows a lot of ideas and operations from both Algebra and Calculus. So, maybe you just need a little brush-up, perhaps? Because, most sciences from a mathematical vantage go hand-in-hand. It certainly more relevant than Geometry. :P
Chaos88
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9/9/2012 5:53:16 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
I think you do not need calculus for what you are describing, and maybe not geometry (but either could come in handy).

In my high school days, it went Alg 1, Geo, Alg 2, statitcs, Calc.
vbaculum
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9/9/2012 10:44:57 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/6/2012 7:28:15 AM, Ren wrote:
At 9/4/2012 8:04:44 PM, vbaculum wrote:

Yes, I don't know how long I can maintain an interests in these subjects.

Yeah, it can get a little mundane, and just enough to fall secondary to a thousand other little things that consume our days.

That sounds pretty cool. Like I said before, I like to apply the knowledge I learn in useful ways instead of just doing exercises at the end of the chapter. I suppose I could use craigslist to find tutoring gigs. I wonder how much a tutor can make.

Tutors can actually make a decent amount of money, and almost always on non-business or weekend hours. If you're down for such a thing, it really isn't bad at all. Tutors start at $20/hr. $40/hr is typical.

Yeah that probably wouldn't work for me. I like to learn first-things-first. I'm not comfortable in environments with a lot of unknowns.

That's interesting... well, for what you're trying to do, you're bound to come across something you're not familiar with, unless you intend to study Math literally for years. It is a complicated and in-depth subject in its more complex manifestations. You'll encounter something written in an unfamiliar notation in a heartbeat, for example, and you'll have to be willing to delve right into it and try to figure out what it's saying, like a translator or cryptographer.

Happens to me all the time, but the subjects I engage are indeed pretty different.

On a side-note, though, if you're already pretty familiar with Statistics, you shouldn't really have a problem with rudimentary math. Stats is pretty complicated, and borrows a lot of ideas and operations from both Algebra and Calculus. So, maybe you just need a little brush-up, perhaps? Because, most sciences from a mathematical vantage go hand-in-hand. It certainly more relevant than Geometry. :P

Yeah, I've noticed that geometry hasn't been mentioned much in the machine learning liturature I've read. I haven't seen much mention of caluclus, but it seem very foundational to so much; it's probably worth studying just for that.
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