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Worst College Majors

chrumbelievable
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10/18/2012 1:30:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Everyone always told me that my combo of English Lit and Women's Studies was one of the worst college majors they'd ever come across. "What are you going to do when you graduate?" "Do you just want to teach?" "Why would you waste your money?" etc. (You better believe that I love rubbing my awesome fresh-outta-college job in those mouthy, now unemployed business majors' faces).

What, in your opinion, are the worst college majors? For me, all education is valuable. However, there are several degrees out there that are commonly deemed "not worth the money." At the same time, plenty of people believe that degrees in general are relatively useless. Thoughts?
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,483
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10/18/2012 2:04:18 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Depends what your metric is. If by "valuable", you mean "marketable", then all of the luxury degrees (e.g., art therapy, fine arts) are obviously the worst. Classical Greek thought had a pretty good point about how people can only engage in contemplative life (e.g., philosophy) once they have sufficient resources to take care of their private needs. Similarly, economies can generally only support the luxury professions (e.g., English, ______ Studies) whenever there is already sufficient nuts-and-bolts labor to provide the excess capacity which can be discharged through thoughtful jobs.

In terms of educational value, though, I have a personal resentment toward a lot of the noisemaking degrees (e.g., all "______ Studies" majors, art history), but that's because I think they're useless and counterproductive. They just equip people, in my experience, to complain, be generally accusatory, and bully people with meaningless buzzwords (e.g., "you're being heteronormative", "Those are profoundly ethnocentric Euro-American assumptions") whose real meaning is diluted by the fuckasses who populate those departments.
bossyburrito
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10/18/2012 2:09:38 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Art.
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innomen
Posts: 10,052
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10/18/2012 2:18:46 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I regret my major of Political Science, but at the time it was a viable path of pre law which was my intention, but if you aren't going into law, it's pretty useless. Were I to do it again, I would have gone into the School of Management; it probably would have been more difficult, but I think it would have been far more beneficial to me today.

I went to a decent school, but I don't know how much it actually contributed to my success. My communication skills, and critical thinking skills were definitely honed while at school, but 90% of my current success is due to my experience, both failures and achievements. The guy who beat me out in a job went to a worse school, is far less articulate, same major, but has a tad more experience in management than I have - and that was the determining factor.
tulle
Posts: 4,445
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10/18/2012 2:42:17 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Honestly, I feel like a BA in Psychology is useless. You can't do anything with it that you can't do with any other Bachelor's Degree. Danielle once said "A Bachelor's Degree is an expensive prerequisite to a job" and that's basically it for a lot of jobs. I graduated with a Specialized Honours Degree AND on the Dean's Honour Roll and ob hunted for 6 months without getting even a single call back or interview. I nearly accepted an Account Manager position at the bank I worked part time for during my undergrad years but my branch manager was a total f*cktard. All in all, my current degree is pretty useless. Even to apply for a Master's in Psychology at the school I want to go to, it seems they prefer health science majors.
yang.
MouthWash
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10/18/2012 2:42:25 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/18/2012 2:18:46 PM, innomen wrote:
I regret my major of Political Science, but at the time it was a viable path of pre law which was my intention, but if you aren't going into law, it's pretty useless. Were I to do it again, I would have gone into the School of Management; it probably would have been more difficult, but I think it would have been far more beneficial to me today.

I went to a decent school, but I don't know how much it actually contributed to my success. My communication skills, and critical thinking skills were definitely honed while at school, but 90% of my current success is due to my experience, both failures and achievements. The guy who beat me out in a job went to a worse school, is far less articulate, same major, but has a tad more experience in management than I have - and that was the determining factor.

Tell this to the people who keep aggravating me about dropping out. :)
"Well, that gives whole new meaning to my assassination. If I was going to die anyway, perhaps I should leave the Bolsheviks' descendants some Christmas cookies instead of breaking their dishes and vodka bottles in their sleep." -Tsar Nicholas II (YYW)
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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10/18/2012 3:35:49 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/18/2012 2:18:46 PM, innomen wrote:
I regret my major of Political Science, but at the time it was a viable path of pre law which was my intention, but if you aren't going into law, it's pretty useless. Were I to do it again, I would have gone into the School of Management; it probably would have been more difficult, but I think it would have been far more beneficial to me today.

I went to a decent school, but I don't know how much it actually contributed to my success. My communication skills, and critical thinking skills were definitely honed while at school, but 90% of my current success is due to my experience, both failures and achievements. The guy who beat me out in a job went to a worse school, is far less articulate, same major, but has a tad more experience in management than I have - and that was the determining factor.

Really? I"m a Labor Studies and Employment Relations major at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers.

(Whoa, that"s a mouth full")

I don't really know how this degree would help me outside of HR (which I work in now), Employment Law (an improbability, but possibility in the distant future), or Union Organizing (which I fully support, but do not plan to pursue as a career though I think mediating is something I"d be good at and may consider). I'm not sure a Management degree would have really helped you get the job, even though management experience probably would have - especially if it was a management position.

You said the guy who beat you out went to a worse school; I personally don"t think that matters unless you went to an Ivy. I also don't think your major is important unless it's for something specific, obviously. I do think articulation and communication are important, but that's not necessarily something that is honed in a classroom. As far as learning to be a manager goes, you can learn all the do's and don'ts from your Management classes, yet still not be effective at it. You do learn a lot about different problems and techniques in the workplace, but I think there's a certain element of personality that is an integral and perhaps more important aspect of being a manager.

I'm not sure leadership can be learned in a class, and many managers are promoted from within the company. For instance, I work at a media company. Even with my Management degree I would not be qualified to manage ANY of the media planners (because I don't have any media planning experience - though I'm going into that field lol Ill have to tell you about it some other time). But my point here is that I'm kind of iffy on the utility of a Management degree.

Right now at my job, the Director of HR is a wonderful woman though not a very good "#1" if you know what I mean. She'd be an excellent #2, which she was before being promoted. Meanwhile, there's another woman in my department whose about the same age as her, and actually the lead recruiter which has a completely different role - but something about the way she carries herself and communicates with others almost makes us all feel like (or want to) report to her. I think she would be a fantastic #1. She doesn't have as much (or any relevant) experience, but the way she communicates, presents herself, and comes off as naturally intelligent is something of value even if she wouldn't look more qualified than our current director on paper.

I dunno - this is probably a very biased analysis because I am someone who looks TERRIBLE on paper, though I'd consider myself a pretty intelligent (and competent) human being. People even tell me that I look dumb, whatever that means (maybe because I'm blonde), so I would hope that when judging me for a job opportunity people would be able to look beyond initial impressions I suppose.

Anyway. I think the "worst" college major is probably Visual Arts. I was thinking maybe Medieval Studies (a real major at my school), but even those liberal-artsy ones teach critical thinking skills, writing skills, and history plus some stuff about culture and society. There's a great lecture on TED on the value of a liberal arts education, though there probably aren't many specific jobs geared toward those majors. However, as someone who doesn't think a college major is especially important, meh. I work for a media company and we hire candidates with English and Math degrees. It depends on the person. Internships are more important than majors, period.
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lewis20
Posts: 5,093
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10/18/2012 4:15:36 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
organizational management
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johnnyboy54
Posts: 6,362
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10/19/2012 6:24:25 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/18/2012 4:15:36 PM, lewis20 wrote:
organizational management

I am taking an organizational management class right now, and it is a waste of time.
I didn't order assholes with my whiskey.
johnnyboy54
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10/19/2012 6:27:26 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Honestly, I would say any of the studies courses for reasons previously mentioned. I would also put philosophy up there.

Don't get me wrong. I find philosophy worthy of study. I was considering majoring in philosophy. However it is just not marketable and it seems like a subject one could learn on their own time.
I didn't order assholes with my whiskey.
innomen
Posts: 10,052
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10/22/2012 4:09:59 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/18/2012 3:35:49 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 10/18/2012 2:18:46 PM, innomen wrote:
I regret my major of Political Science, but at the time it was a viable path of pre law which was my intention, but if you aren't going into law, it's pretty useless. Were I to do it again, I would have gone into the School of Management; it probably would have been more difficult, but I think it would have been far more beneficial to me today.

I went to a decent school, but I don't know how much it actually contributed to my success. My communication skills, and critical thinking skills were definitely honed while at school, but 90% of my current success is due to my experience, both failures and achievements. The guy who beat me out in a job went to a worse school, is far less articulate, same major, but has a tad more experience in management than I have - and that was the determining factor.

Really? I"m a Labor Studies and Employment Relations major at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers.

(Whoa, that"s a mouth full")

I don't really know how this degree would help me outside of HR (which I work in now), Employment Law (an improbability, but possibility in the distant future), or Union Organizing (which I fully support, but do not plan to pursue as a career though I think mediating is something I"d be good at and may consider). I'm not sure a Management degree would have really helped you get the job, even though management experience probably would have - especially if it was a management position.

You said the guy who beat you out went to a worse school; I personally don"t think that matters unless you went to an Ivy. I also don't think your major is important unless it's for something specific, obviously. I do think articulation and communication are important, but that's not necessarily something that is honed in a classroom. As far as learning to be a manager goes, you can learn all the do's and don'ts from your Management classes, yet still not be effective at it. You do learn a lot about different problems and techniques in the workplace, but I think there's a certain element of personality that is an integral and perhaps more important aspect of being a manager.

I'm not sure leadership can be learned in a class, and many managers are promoted from within the company. For instance, I work at a media company. Even with my Management degree I would not be qualified to manage ANY of the media planners (because I don't have any media planning experience - though I'm going into that field lol Ill have to tell you about it some other time). But my point here is that I'm kind of iffy on the utility of a Management degree.

Right now at my job, the Director of HR is a wonderful woman though not a very good "#1" if you know what I mean. She'd be an excellent #2, which she was before being promoted. Meanwhile, there's another woman in my department whose about the same age as her, and actually the lead recruiter which has a completely different role - but something about the way she carries herself and communicates with others almost makes us all feel like (or want to) report to her. I think she would be a fantastic #1. She doesn't have as much (or any relevant) experience, but the way she communicates, presents herself, and comes off as naturally intelligent is something of value even if she wouldn't look more qualified than our current director on paper.

I dunno - this is probably a very biased analysis because I am someone who looks TERRIBLE on paper, though I'd consider myself a pretty intelligent (and competent) human being. People even tell me that I look dumb, whatever that means (maybe because I'm blonde), so I would hope that when judging me for a job opportunity people would be able to look beyond initial impressions I suppose.

Anyway. I think the "worst" college major is probably Visual Arts. I was thinking maybe Medieval Studies (a real major at my school), but even those liberal-artsy ones teach critical thinking skills, writing skills, and history plus some stuff about culture and society. There's a great lecture on TED on the value of a liberal arts education, though there probably aren't many specific jobs geared toward those majors. However, as someone who doesn't think a college major is especially important, meh. I work for a media company and we hire candidates with English and Math degrees. It depends on the person. Internships are more important than majors, period.

I'm not completely sure what your conclusion is. Perhaps innate talent plays a bigger role in how we end up in work. An MBA seems to carry some weight, but when I look at my daily challenges, which is mostly fighting competition, there is no class that I could have taken to properly prepare for this. All of my work is the result of my many years in the industry, and being in close tune with what's going on at any given moment.

I have a close friend who got his doctorate in computer sciences at MIT. He graduated sometime in the 80's and works at Intel. He told me that everything he learned in school can now be bought off the rack at OfficeMax.

There are some foundations, some confidence, and some connections that will come in varying degrees of each college degree, but yeah, most comes from accrued experience.
Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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10/22/2012 4:41:43 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Business.
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phantom
Posts: 6,774
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10/22/2012 10:31:40 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Parapsychology
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Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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10/25/2012 5:23:55 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/24/2012 9:28:35 AM, Ron-Paul wrote:
At 10/22/2012 4:41:43 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
Business.

Wtf? That belongs in the best majors list.

Unless you somehow manage to get a degree from an Ivy League school, bachelor business degrees are a dime a dozen and virtually worthless.
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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10/25/2012 5:56:33 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/25/2012 5:23:55 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
At 10/24/2012 9:28:35 AM, Ron-Paul wrote:
At 10/22/2012 4:41:43 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
Business.

Wtf? That belongs in the best majors list.

Unless you somehow manage to get a degree from an Ivy League school, bachelor business degrees are a dime a dozen and virtually worthless.

Except there's more of a demand for high-skill workers over low-skill workers now. Most companies spend their money on administration and marketing, not necessarily "production".
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FREEDO
Posts: 21,057
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10/25/2012 7:00:53 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The major with the lowest starting salary and ten year average salary from this list is Preparatory. But that one doesn't really count. The next is Education, at around $50,843 a year, in the ten year average.

I'll be double majoring in Economics and Psychology. Economics makes $163,099 and Psychology makes $77,588. They compliment each other into Behavioral Economics. And these numbers are probably averaging lower degrees with doctorates. I want a doctorate. So I expect to be making over $200,000 a year.
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FREEDO
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10/25/2012 7:02:40 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I think Economics is actually the single smartest thing to major in. Matched only, perhaps, by Astronomy.
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fnord
Ron-Paul
Posts: 2,557
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11/6/2012 6:57:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/25/2012 5:23:55 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
At 10/24/2012 9:28:35 AM, Ron-Paul wrote:
At 10/22/2012 4:41:43 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
Business.

Wtf? That belongs in the best majors list.

Unless you somehow manage to get a degree from an Ivy League school, bachelor business degrees are a dime a dozen and virtually worthless.

Agreed. I was talking about MBAs.
muzebreak
Posts: 2,781
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11/8/2012 6:50:17 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/21/2012 3:14:43 PM, twocupcakes wrote:
I think philosophy is pretty useless. History also pretty useless.

How so?
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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11/8/2012 12:56:01 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/8/2012 6:50:17 AM, muzebreak wrote:
At 10/21/2012 3:14:43 PM, twocupcakes wrote:
I think philosophy is pretty useless. History also pretty useless.

How so?

Not real world application. No work skills really learned from it.
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muzebreak
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11/8/2012 5:48:20 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/8/2012 12:56:01 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 11/8/2012 6:50:17 AM, muzebreak wrote:
At 10/21/2012 3:14:43 PM, twocupcakes wrote:
I think philosophy is pretty useless. History also pretty useless.

How so?

Not real world application. No work skills really learned from it.

Seriously? You must be joking.

Not even bringing up the teaching positions, both of those degree's have lots of real world applications and a ridiculous amount of work skills.

Philosophy alone allows you to think logically and broadens your prespective. And history, well we all know that we are doomed to repeat that which we don't learn from. It seems to me your trying to make this easy for me because you picked two of the area's where these degree's accell more then most others.

Here's a great exert from an article by The Guardian on degrees in philosophy.

"Studying philosophy will have taught you to think logically and critically about issues, to analyse and construct arguments and to be open to new ways of thinking. In addition, you should be able to write clearly and persuasively, absorb and sift complex information and to distinguish between different views and come to a reasoned opinion. You will also be self-motivated, creative and used to prioritising your work and working to deadline " all talents sought after by employers."

And here's one from the same paper on history degrees.

"History provides graduates with a wide range of transferable skills. Principally, students develop the ability to understand and analyse issues and events to a high level of competence. Other marketable skills include:

" a talent for clear expression, both oral and written;

" putting forward ideas and arguments in a concise manner;

" gathering, investigating and assessing material;

" basing conclusions on research and generating ideas;

" organising material in a logical and coherent way.

To employers who recruit graduates in any discipline, these skills will be more important than the actual subject."

Without philosophers we wouldn't have the scientific method. And without historians we wouldn't have one of our most precious resources: Recorded history.

But there's not only all of this, but with a degree in philosophy or history comes a certain understanding, a certain outlook, that most people don't have. Everyone looks at the world differently, but some people get the best view and in my opinion those people are philosophers, historians, and physicists. In the words of Sheldon Cooper "It's like looking at the universe naked".

Sorry if I seem defensive or rude but philosophy is what I want to do, and history is my second choice.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
comoncents
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11/18/2012 11:32:41 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/18/2012 1:30:10 PM, chrumbelievable wrote:
Everyone always told me that my combo of English Lit and Women's Studies was one of the worst college majors they'd ever come across. "What are you going to do when you graduate?" "Do you just want to teach?" "Why would you waste your money?" etc. (You better believe that I love rubbing my awesome fresh-outta-college job in those mouthy, now unemployed business majors' faces).

What, in your opinion, are the worst college majors? For me, all education is valuable. However, there are several degrees out there that are commonly deemed "not worth the money." At the same time, plenty of people believe that degrees in general are relatively useless. Thoughts?

I took a Women's Studies class and liked it a lot. I think it could welcome a good career... doing something... maybe?
twocupcakes
Posts: 2,750
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11/19/2012 9:40:02 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/8/2012 5:48:20 PM, muzebreak wrote:
At 11/8/2012 12:56:01 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 11/8/2012 6:50:17 AM, muzebreak wrote:
At 10/21/2012 3:14:43 PM, twocupcakes wrote:
I think philosophy is pretty useless. History also pretty useless.

How so?

Not real world application. No work skills really learned from it.

Seriously? You must be joking.

Not even bringing up the teaching positions, both of those degree's have lots of real world applications and a ridiculous amount of work skills.

Not really, unless you want to a philosopher or a historian, what job would employers like to see a philosophy or history compared to others?

Philosophy alone allows you to think logically and broadens your prespective. And history, well we all know that we are doomed to repeat that which we don't learn from. It seems to me your trying to make this easy for me because you picked two of the area's where these degree's accell more then most others.

All subjects allow you to think logically. A economics, finance, engineering or science degree surely requires more critical thinking/analytic ability. An economics student will know the history of economics, a business student will know past business case studies. I doubt employers are worried about needing a history major so they do not repeat the past.

Here's a great exert from an article by The Guardian on degrees in philosophy.

"Studying philosophy will have taught you to think logically and critically about issues, to analyse and construct arguments and to be open to new ways of thinking. In addition, you should be able to write clearly and persuasively, absorb and sift complex information and to distinguish between different views and come to a reasoned opinion. You will also be self-motivated, creative and used to prioritising your work and working to deadline " all talents sought after by employers."

All majors argue and write papers. The difference is other majors write about more relevant topics to their industry. Furthermore, philosophy writing is very verbose as compared to business writing which is straight and to the point.

And here's one from the same paper on history degrees.

"History provides graduates with a wide range of transferable skills. Principally, students develop the ability to understand and analyse issues and events to a high level of competence. Other marketable skills include:

Again, all majors teach people to understand and analyse issues. The difference is understanding and analyzing business, science, economic or engineering issues is much more relevant to industries.

" a talent for clear expression, both oral and written;

" putting forward ideas and arguments in a concise manner;

" gathering, investigating and assessing material;

" basing conclusions on research and generating ideas;

" organising material in a logical and coherent way.

To employers who recruit graduates in any discipline, these skills will be more important than the actual subject."

Does majoring in history produce these skills better than other majors? I don't think so.

Without philosophers we wouldn't have the scientific method. And without historians we wouldn't have one of our most precious resources: Recorded history.

But there's not only all of this, but with a degree in philosophy or history comes a certain understanding, a certain outlook, that most people don't have. Everyone looks at the world differently, but some people get the best view and in my opinion those people are philosophers, historians, and physicists. In the words of Sheldon Cooper "It's like looking at the universe naked".

Sorry if I seem defensive or rude but philosophy is what I want to do, and history is my second choice.

If you really want to do it then it is good to do regardless of a job. Of course, a really capable philosophy student will get a job. But, other majors prepare for employment better. If you like philosophy or history, it is not useless. But, what do you want to do? Unless you want to be a philosopher or historian, there should be another degree that can prepare you better for employment.

On a side note, I took a philosophy class and thought it was gonna be awesome. I ended up hating it. I found it soo irrelevant and useless. I preferred arguing about what is right in a Business Ethics class as opposed to philosophy.
twocupcakes
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11/19/2012 9:42:42 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
^

I don't mean to demean you passion, I think it is good to do what you like, regardless of if it will get you money/job. But compared to other degrees, history and philosophy are pretty useless. In your opinion, what is a more useless degree than history and philosophy?
The_Master_Riddler
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11/27/2012 6:05:28 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Photography is worse than philosophhy, at least youu can teach philosophy at a school, and be a therapist
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