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Employable skills.

Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
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2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?
Polaris
Posts: 1,120
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2/7/2013 3:54:26 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

Spanish.

Employers love to see Bilingual applicants, especially languages they are likely to encounter. Other communication skills are highly desirable as well.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
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2/7/2013 4:39:59 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
You're taking PPE? I'm guessing you want to become a politician?
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

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Greyparrot
Posts: 14,282
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2/7/2013 4:40:04 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Sociology/psychology type courses might help in catering to the public as well. Always look for courses with the goal: "I know what you want, here is what I can do for you."
Franz_Reynard
Posts: 1,227
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2/8/2013 11:50:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

Gee, you have all the essential bases covered, it looks.

I would look into some sort of visual arts production -- drawing and/or graphic design can be a big unexpected plus.

Python won't help much professionally. Learn C++, Adobe Flash, and HTML. Especially the latter.

You sound like you intend to go places, so I'd study transformational leadership, as well.
Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
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2/9/2013 8:39:05 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/7/2013 4:39:59 PM, bossyburrito wrote:
You're taking PPE? I'm guessing you want to become a politician?

I'm considering going down that route (along with plenty of others). Or political jobs, like ambassador or government consultant. They all seem like jobs that are unlikely to get boring, and also unlikely to constrain future career paths.

When I'm Prime Minister I'll fund DDO with British tax money. :D
Kinesis
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2/9/2013 8:39:54 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I like the idea of public speaking. I'm a fairly introverted person so that's definitely a weakness in my skill set. I'll see if there are any suitable societies I can join.
Kinesis
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2/9/2013 8:40:52 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/9/2013 8:39:05 AM, Kinesis wrote:
At 2/7/2013 4:39:59 PM, bossyburrito wrote:
You're taking PPE? I'm guessing you want to become a politician?

I'm considering going down that route (along with plenty of others). Or political jobs, like ambassador or government consultant. They all seem like jobs that are unlikely to get boring, and also unlikely to constrain future career paths.

When I'm Prime Minister I'll fund DDO with British tax money. :D

Actually, how the fvck is DDO funded? Adverts to non-members? But we haven't always had that right?
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
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2/9/2013 8:43:20 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/9/2013 8:40:52 AM, Kinesis wrote:
At 2/9/2013 8:39:05 AM, Kinesis wrote:
At 2/7/2013 4:39:59 PM, bossyburrito wrote:
You're taking PPE? I'm guessing you want to become a politician?

I'm considering going down that route (along with plenty of others). Or political jobs, like ambassador or government consultant. They all seem like jobs that are unlikely to get boring, and also unlikely to constrain future career paths.

When I'm Prime Minister I'll fund DDO with British tax money. :D

Actually, how the fvck is DDO funded? Adverts to non-members? But we haven't always had that right?

Juggle makes money from their other sites (pure conjecture).
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
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2/9/2013 8:44:32 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/8/2013 11:50:43 AM, Franz_Reynard wrote:
Gee, you have all the essential bases covered, it looks.

I would look into some sort of visual arts production -- drawing and/or graphic design can be a big unexpected plus.

I'll keep that in mind. I've never tried stuff like that before.

Python won't help much professionally. Learn C++, Adobe Flash, and HTML. Especially the latter.

The only reason I'm learning it is because it's a specific course offered by my lecturer so it's really easy (and he's provided good learning materials). Learning to use Python is just a prerequisite, I think. The real stuff is learning data mining techniques not covered in my statistics course that might be of use to companies/charities/government whatever.

You sound like you intend to go places, so I'd study transformational leadership, as well.

Um, I'm not sure what that is.
Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
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2/9/2013 8:45:12 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/9/2013 8:43:20 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 2/9/2013 8:40:52 AM, Kinesis wrote:
At 2/9/2013 8:39:05 AM, Kinesis wrote:
At 2/7/2013 4:39:59 PM, bossyburrito wrote:
You're taking PPE? I'm guessing you want to become a politician?

I'm considering going down that route (along with plenty of others). Or political jobs, like ambassador or government consultant. They all seem like jobs that are unlikely to get boring, and also unlikely to constrain future career paths.

When I'm Prime Minister I'll fund DDO with British tax money. :D

Actually, how the fvck is DDO funded? Adverts to non-members? But we haven't always had that right?

Juggle makes money from their other sites (pure conjecture).

Ah, we're funded with thievery. Same as taxes then.
innomen
Posts: 10,052
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2/13/2013 1:34:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Math math math or as you people on the island say it, maths maths maths.

I wish I was a lot better in math, and the more you know the more you can do with it, in analysis. I'm in a business where you don't necessarily need it, but the more you have with it the better your analysis is, and the faster you can work. I cannot think of a single line of work in my company where having more and better math skills wouldn't benefit that person.

There are a lot of qualities that you should develop that they don't teach so much, like being likeable and outgoing. Being articulate is also incredibly important, but I doubt you'll have a problem here, but there is a combination of articulation and non-arrogant confidence that the star players seem to always have.
imabench
Posts: 21,219
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2/13/2013 1:41:24 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/7/2013 3:54:26 PM, Polaris wrote:
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

Spanish.

Employers love to see Bilingual applicants, especially languages they are likely to encounter. Other communication skills are highly desirable as well.

^ do NOT do Spanish, theres an overabundant number of those already out there. If you learn Chinese or Arabic, that will really make you unique. Japanese counts too.
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Bull_Diesel
Posts: 1,955
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2/13/2013 1:51:04 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/13/2013 1:41:24 PM, imabench wrote:
At 2/7/2013 3:54:26 PM, Polaris wrote:
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

Spanish.

Employers love to see Bilingual applicants, especially languages they are likely to encounter. Other communication skills are highly desirable as well.

^ do NOT do Spanish, theres an overabundant number of those already out there. If you learn Chinese or Arabic, that will really make you unique. Japanese counts too.

disagree, being fluent in spanish will help you a ton if you plan on being anywhere in the americas, in Europe, probably French and Some form of slavic.

If you're ever interested in a job in the States i'd DEFINITELY try to learn spanish, it's a super easy language to learn
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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2/13/2013 1:51:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/9/2013 8:39:05 AM, Kinesis wrote:
At 2/7/2013 4:39:59 PM, bossyburrito wrote:
You're taking PPE? I'm guessing you want to become a politician?

I'm considering going down that route (along with plenty of others). Or political jobs, like ambassador or government consultant. They all seem like jobs that are unlikely to get boring, and also unlikely to constrain future career paths.

When I'm Prime Minister I'll fund DDO with British tax money. :D

Which Uni?
Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach him how to be Gay, he'll positively influence the GDP.

Social Contract Theory debate: http://www.debate.org...
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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2/13/2013 1:53:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/13/2013 1:41:24 PM, imabench wrote:
At 2/7/2013 3:54:26 PM, Polaris wrote:
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

Spanish.

Employers love to see Bilingual applicants, especially languages they are likely to encounter. Other communication skills are highly desirable as well.

^ do NOT do Spanish, theres an overabundant number of those already out there. If you learn Chinese or Arabic, that will really make you unique. Japanese counts too.

Don't do Chinese, it's not a language. Mandarin is a language, but no businessman who does international work speaks it. Japanese is similar, but speaking it to companies is a great sign of respect. Moreover, Arabic is mostly different dialects, not a unified language.

Learn french. UK companies love it, and if you ever work in the UN or EU it is a massively important linguistic skill.
Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach him how to be Gay, he'll positively influence the GDP.

Social Contract Theory debate: http://www.debate.org...
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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2/13/2013 6:40:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/13/2013 1:34:41 PM, innomen wrote:
Math math math or as you people on the island say it, maths maths maths.

I wish I was a lot better in math, and the more you know the more you can do with it, in analysis. I'm in a business where you don't necessarily need it, but the more you have with it the better your analysis is, and the faster you can work. I cannot think of a single line of work in my company where having more and better math skills wouldn't benefit that person.

There are a lot of qualities that you should develop that they don't teach so much, like being likeable and outgoing. Being articulate is also incredibly important, but I doubt you'll have a problem here, but there is a combination of articulation and non-arrogant confidence that the star players seem to always have.

^

I wish I knew when I was in university that math is the key that opens all the doors, especially to grad school.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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2/13/2013 6:44:10 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/13/2013 1:53:51 PM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
At 2/13/2013 1:41:24 PM, imabench wrote:
At 2/7/2013 3:54:26 PM, Polaris wrote:
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

Spanish.

Employers love to see Bilingual applicants, especially languages they are likely to encounter. Other communication skills are highly desirable as well.

^ do NOT do Spanish, theres an overabundant number of those already out there. If you learn Chinese or Arabic, that will really make you unique. Japanese counts too.

Don't do Chinese, it's not a language. Mandarin is a language, but no businessman who does international work speaks it. Japanese is similar, but speaking it to companies is a great sign of respect. Moreover, Arabic is mostly different dialects, not a unified language.

Learn french. UK companies love it, and if you ever work in the UN or EU it is a massively important linguistic skill.

I think in 20 years' time this will change. Japanese is not similar in that Japan did not and will not have the global economic impact that China will have going forward. The Chinese are also quite Sino-centric, and know that their economy is currently but modest compared to other countries. A little Chinese would go a long way in such an environment, unlike us Americans that get offended if foreigners don't speak perfect English.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
Muted
Posts: 377
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2/14/2013 2:34:31 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
In terms of linguistics, I would suggest learning my mother tongue, Chinese. It is a language that is very hard to master, but as you're learning Japanese, it should be no great difficulty.

If you're intending to go into politics, you'd have to master public speaking. Perhaps even informally study the law.

The great question I have right now is, what kind of a future are you intending to have? Are you just going to jump at the highest paying job you can find? I really don't know what your goals in life is.
Exterminate!!!!!!-Dalek.

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FREEDO
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2/15/2013 12:11:19 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/13/2013 6:44:10 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
I think in 20 years' time this will change. Japanese is not similar in that Japan did not and will not have the global economic impact that China will have going forward. The Chinese are also quite Sino-centric, and know that their economy is currently but modest compared to other countries. A little Chinese would go a long way in such an environment, unlike us Americans that get offended if foreigners don't speak perfect English.

13,000th post in education.
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Jcampbell
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4/24/2013 5:44:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/13/2013 1:34:41 PM, innomen wrote:
Math math math or as you people on the island say it, maths maths maths.

I wish I was a lot better in math, and the more you know the more you can do with it, in analysis. I'm in a business where you don't necessarily need it, but the more you have with it the better your analysis is, and the faster you can work. I cannot think of a single line of work in my company where having more and better math skills wouldn't benefit that person.

There are a lot of qualities that you should develop that they don't teach so much, like being likeable and outgoing. Being articulate is also incredibly important, but I doubt you'll have a problem here, but there is a combination of articulation and non-arrogant confidence that the star players seem to always have.

I don't agree with this. My dad who is an accountant once told me, "all the math you need in accounting is probably learned in junior high school." I know at least one accountant who is reasonably incompetent in math.
suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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5/1/2013 9:38:02 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I used to tell all my junior and council, if you know what you want to do, do it best and all is good. If not, there are only two choice for you: Engineering and Finance.
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
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5/4/2013 9:30:06 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/14/2013 2:34:31 AM, Muted wrote:
In terms of linguistics, I would suggest learning my mother tongue, Chinese. It is a language that is very hard to master, but as you're learning Japanese, it should be no great difficulty.

I seriously disagree. Japanese is easily romanized and it also has a phonetic alphabet. Chinese, depending on the dialect, has multiple tones per syllable and takes many, many years to fluently read and write. Especially to the level in government.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Kleptin
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5/4/2013 9:32:29 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 2/7/2013 12:37:48 PM, Kinesis wrote:
So, I'm thinking about what skills I want to learn on the side while I complete my university degree (politics, philosophy and economics). I'm learning Japanese and there's a society start up by my statistics lecturer about data mining that requires learning some basic programming knowledge (in python).

What skills do people think would be especially useful/rewarding later on that I could pick up at university?

A part time job or an internship. I don't know how it is across the pond, but here in the US, dreams get crushed by the economy. Unless you're born rich or connected, you won't get near the upper echelons of employment. Hard work can really only get you past poverty into the middle class, or help you stay there.

Figure out how many jobs there are in the market for the job you want. If the number is less than 5 digits, reconsider your job choice.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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5/5/2013 9:56:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
The most important skill is to learn how to write. You will have to write for your regular courses, but that's not a good way to learn how to write. It's like learning how to swim by jumping in the ocean and flailing around. Getting instruction or, if you can manage it, working with a good editor is the best way to learn. Proficiency is only measured in part by the quality of what you produce; the speed of producing it is very important.

I have been trying to learn Japanese for years; it's tough. Spanish is a lot easier, but I agree that there are a lot of bilingual English/Spanish speakers, so not likely to be as valuable as a less common language like Japanese. The Japanese seem to appreciate those who have learned even a little of their language. There is a lot of interesting stuff published in Japanese that isn't translated.

Mandarin Chinese would also be a very good choice. I understand that Chinese is the top choice in business grad schools these days. While the tones are difficult for English speakers, overall the language is regarded as one of the easiest to learn. Writing Chinese is a different matter; my wife says college level writing proficiency requires learning 20,000 characters. Japanese only uses 2000 of the Chinese characters.