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Homeschooling 6 Kids to College by Age 12

vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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5/2/2013 12:11:58 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/1/2013 2:05:08 PM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
http://www.today.com...

Somehow, it's not that surprising.

I plan to homeschool my son. I could probably get him into college by the time he is 12 but I wouldn't want to rush it.

It sounds like, with the emphasis on letting the child's interests take the lead, they are using some form of unschooling (I wish the article had more information about their technique).

I've been teaching myself things for decades and I know how crucial ones interest in learning a subject is to actually absorbing the material. I couldn't have had an interest in the stock market, like I do now, in my 20's, so I didn't bother with it back then. Now, it's much more interesting, as I have money to invest and a family to provide for.

However, it's hard for me to see how unschooling can be reconciled with meeting state requirements. In other words, say may son is captivated by computer programming, but I have to say, "Enough of that, back to grammar/history/whatever". Plus, there are going to be things he needs to learn that he may not be interested in at any given moment. Obviously, I haven't looked much into unschooling, because I am sure these are just naive, beginners questions.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
TheAlmightyBob
Posts: 7
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6/25/2013 8:16:15 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I know I am parroting largely what vbaculum just stated. Interest is something that is very key if you are trying to educate or be educated. Our current school system takes us away from our curiosity and forces a curriculum with very little variation and shallow depth. The skills I have seen to succeed in high school and to succeed in home schooling are completely different. It often seems when they try to put someone from public schooling into home schooling or a variation, there is a break down. The reason being the skills and dependencies that they have been developed over the years simply do not apply to this environment.

Another big deal on how they educated their children is the age in which they did so. Often you will find that teenagers take initiative usually in high-school to try something like this. As stated above there typically is very little success. Also to kind of touch on the topic stated by vbaculum about how to meet state requirements while using an unschooling method. So in your example you talked about computer programming so I am going to base my response largely to that example.

Computer programming is not one single skill, if he is teaching himself or you are teaching him you can actually branch out into other subjects. For example math and computer programming go hand in hand. Though it may take a bit more work and creativity you can teach him math or he can teach himself. Also making it applicable to what he likes as well as teaching what he needs. On a side tangent as well, as someone who does an accredited form of online schooling it does not take long to finish an academic day by public school standards.

Typically for me it takes me two hours on a core subject to finish two to three days-and if I am lucky I can finish a high school core course in two weeks. So you will not necessarily be going by a public format where it is 7+ hours of curriculum and scheduled time. Also if you are teaching one on one the time spent will be much more efficient because he has someone to guide him through what he is doing even if it is a little. Often I found myself being propelled by my own interests or wants when doing school. So if I wanted to do English for example, I would look at the contents of the course and decide whether or not I wanted to do it. Worse case scenario I hate it half way through, but I am already half way through the entire course and can force myself to do it, by enticing rewards like an elective afterwards.

TLDR: To sum it up, it is very possible and more easy than people realize to do what this lady did. The child's motivations and curiosities make learning much easier. To vbaculum, if you are going to home school/unschool your child you are going to find some tricks to get you where you need to go.
Sorry for the horrendous size I felt like I could offer a lot on the subject.
slo1
Posts: 4,312
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6/26/2013 8:42:05 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/1/2013 2:05:08 PM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
http://www.today.com...

This family seems well adjusted. Unfortunately they are not the norm. Just imagine a world where home schooling was the only education children received.

A good 90% of parents couldn't do it either because of economics, knowledge, or relationship with their children. Also unfortunately, more and more it seems to be a way for parents to control their children to continue and not disrupt the indoctrination of the parents belief systems. (I support their right to home school, but I still cringe.)

Going to college at age 12, if the child is capable is a great thing. It is not for everyone though.
mathdebator
Posts: 72
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6/27/2013 5:01:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
It would be difficult to make homeshooling and unschooling the norm, but we should encourage people to learn on their own. Things that I am interested in, such as computers & tech, could be easily learned about at home/without the help of anybody else.

I've learned an amazing amount of information from people like Bucky Roberts and Eli the Computer Guy on YouTube. No college, no help from school (partially because I hate how the tech teachers at my school have no knowledge at all about real computer stuff - seriously, the Comp Sci. teacher has a degree business, and guess what she does, teaches business!)

Even Bucky, who goes by thenewboston on YouTube, dropped out of college and started learning on his own.