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4.0 GPA scale

000ike
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5/4/2013 7:29:17 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
can someone explain this to me? Does this mean that an A- and an A+ both just count as an A, so even if your report card varies between A- and A+, you still get a flat 4.0, whereas the people who have entirely all A+s would be getting the same GPA rating as you? Do colleges actually use this scale or do they only use the GPA scale provided on your transcript?
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
Eitan_Zohar
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5/4/2013 7:38:17 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Whoops, sorry, didn't realize you were that sensitive.
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lannan13
Posts: 23,022
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5/5/2013 8:40:11 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 5:19:18 AM, Smithereens wrote:
GPA? A+?

Meh, no idea what you are talking about. My country uses numbers instead of letters. Sorry.

Same here.
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RoyLatham
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5/5/2013 9:18:30 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Unless it's been changed recently, the system is that A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, F = 0. Only the letter grades are assigned for each course, A+ = A- = A = 4. However, the Grade Point Average averages the courses to produce a non-integer number. So if you get half A's and half B's, then GPA = 3.5.

Typically individual tests within a course are scored from 0 to 100, and at the end of the course, the prof decides what the cut offs are for each letter grade. An 80 in one course might be an A, while it might be a B in another course.

That said, be aware that individual schools may use different systems. My school had a five point system (A = 5) that I've never seen elsewhere. It's possible some schools assign something like 3.2 for a B+.
000ike
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5/5/2013 9:29:35 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 9:18:30 AM, RoyLatham wrote:
Unless it's been changed recently, the system is that A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, F = 0. Only the letter grades are assigned for each course, A+ = A- = A = 4. However, the Grade Point Average averages the courses to produce a non-integer number. So if you get half A's and half B's, then GPA = 3.5.

Typically individual tests within a course are scored from 0 to 100, and at the end of the course, the prof decides what the cut offs are for each letter grade. An 80 in one course might be an A, while it might be a B in another course.

That said, be aware that individual schools may use different systems. My school had a five point system (A = 5) that I've never seen elsewhere. It's possible some schools assign something like 3.2 for a B+.

Oh I see. So which one do colleges actually end up looking at? Is it just whatever your high school provides?

My High school's scale is 4.33 for A+, 4.00 for A, 3.80 for A- etc.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
EvanK
Posts: 599
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5/5/2013 9:45:32 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/4/2013 7:29:17 PM, 000ike wrote:
can someone explain this to me? Does this mean that an A- and an A+ both just count as an A, so even if your report card varies between A- and A+, you still get a flat 4.0, whereas the people who have entirely all A+s would be getting the same GPA rating as you? Do colleges actually use this scale or do they only use the GPA scale provided on your transcript?

I'm homeschooled, and we score on a scale of 100. Basically, like this-http://www.collegeboard.com...

It depends on the school, some skip the +/- and go for letters only, some scale, like us, on a scale of 65-100 and just use a converter chart to convert it to a GPA. As far as colleges go, that would depend on each college. In Indiana, a homeschooler's transcript is legal so long as the parent/guardian/tutor or whoever taught, signs the transcript. So it would be up to the college to determine how to grade the student's GPA, in relation to state laws of the student's residence. Since the laws in Indiana are rather lax when it comes to homeschooling, it would be a little more difficult, (because you don't necessarily have to make the classes all that difficult, plus the parents can be biased), making it harder to get into bigger colleges, especially out of state ones not used to Indiana's laws. I think colleges will look at the grading methold for the school, classes taken and the difficulty of each class to determine their own "GPA" of the student, and determine whether or not to admit the student.

Hope this helps.
The problem with socialism is that, sooner or later, you run out of people's money."_Margaret Thatcher

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government."_Thomas Jefferson

"The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it."_Thomas Jefferson

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dylancatlow
Posts: 12,242
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5/5/2013 9:51:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 9:45:32 AM, EvanK wrote:
At 5/4/2013 7:29:17 PM, 000ike wrote:
can someone explain this to me? Does this mean that an A- and an A+ both just count as an A, so even if your report card varies between A- and A+, you still get a flat 4.0, whereas the people who have entirely all A+s would be getting the same GPA rating as you? Do colleges actually use this scale or do they only use the GPA scale provided on your transcript?

I'm homeschooled, and we score on a scale of 100. Basically, like this-http://www.collegeboard.com...

It depends on the school, some skip the +/- and go for letters only, some scale, like us, on a scale of 65-100 and just use a converter chart to convert it to a GPA. As far as colleges go, that would depend on each college. In Indiana, a homeschooler's transcript is legal so long as the parent/guardian/tutor or whoever taught, signs the transcript. So it would be up to the college to determine how to grade the student's GPA, in relation to state laws of the student's residence. Since the laws in Indiana are rather lax when it comes to homeschooling, it would be a little more difficult, (because you don't necessarily have to make the classes all that difficult, plus the parents can be biased), making it harder to get into bigger colleges, especially out of state ones not used to Indiana's laws. I think colleges will look at the grading methold for the school, classes taken and the difficulty of each class to determine their own "GPA" of the student, and determine whether or not to admit the student.

Hope this helps.

Who grades your work?
dylancatlow
Posts: 12,242
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5/5/2013 9:53:18 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 9:51:43 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
At 5/5/2013 9:45:32 AM, EvanK wrote:
At 5/4/2013 7:29:17 PM, 000ike wrote:
can someone explain this to me? Does this mean that an A- and an A+ both just count as an A, so even if your report card varies between A- and A+, you still get a flat 4.0, whereas the people who have entirely all A+s would be getting the same GPA rating as you? Do colleges actually use this scale or do they only use the GPA scale provided on your transcript?

I'm homeschooled, and we score on a scale of 100. Basically, like this-http://www.collegeboard.com...

It depends on the school, some skip the +/- and go for letters only, some scale, like us, on a scale of 65-100 and just use a converter chart to convert it to a GPA. As far as colleges go, that would depend on each college. In Indiana, a homeschooler's transcript is legal so long as the parent/guardian/tutor or whoever taught, signs the transcript. So it would be up to the college to determine how to grade the student's GPA, in relation to state laws of the student's residence. Since the laws in Indiana are rather lax when it comes to homeschooling, it would be a little more difficult, (because you don't necessarily have to make the classes all that difficult, plus the parents can be biased), making it harder to get into bigger colleges, especially out of state ones not used to Indiana's laws. I think colleges will look at the grading methold for the school, classes taken and the difficulty of each class to determine their own "GPA" of the student, and determine whether or not to admit the student.

Hope this helps.

Who grades your work?

Nvm, I found it.
EvanK
Posts: 599
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5/5/2013 9:57:53 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 9:51:43 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
At 5/5/2013 9:45:32 AM, EvanK wrote:
At 5/4/2013 7:29:17 PM, 000ike wrote:
can someone explain this to me? Does this mean that an A- and an A+ both just count as an A, so even if your report card varies between A- and A+, you still get a flat 4.0, whereas the people who have entirely all A+s would be getting the same GPA rating as you? Do colleges actually use this scale or do they only use the GPA scale provided on your transcript?

I'm homeschooled, and we score on a scale of 100. Basically, like this-http://www.collegeboard.com...

It depends on the school, some skip the +/- and go for letters only, some scale, like us, on a scale of 65-100 and just use a converter chart to convert it to a GPA. As far as colleges go, that would depend on each college. In Indiana, a homeschooler's transcript is legal so long as the parent/guardian/tutor or whoever taught, signs the transcript. So it would be up to the college to determine how to grade the student's GPA, in relation to state laws of the student's residence. Since the laws in Indiana are rather lax when it comes to homeschooling, it would be a little more difficult, (because you don't necessarily have to make the classes all that difficult, plus the parents can be biased), making it harder to get into bigger colleges, especially out of state ones not used to Indiana's laws. I think colleges will look at the grading methold for the school, classes taken and the difficulty of each class to determine their own "GPA" of the student, and determine whether or not to admit the student.

Hope this helps.

Who grades your work?

My parents do. Math, science, geography, economics, government, and a few more classes are done from workbooks, with answer books making bias not a problem. They simply convert my percantage of right answers into a grade (90% right=A for instance). Others, like papers written, are graded by my Dad, who is good at writing, and who I can say isn't biased, as I've had some bad grades in English lol xD
The problem with socialism is that, sooner or later, you run out of people's money."_Margaret Thatcher

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government."_Thomas Jefferson

"The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it."_Thomas Jefferson

"It is easier to fool someone than to convince them that they have been fooled."-Mark Twain
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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5/5/2013 9:59:07 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 9:18:30 AM, RoyLatham wrote:
Unless it's been changed recently, the system is that A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1, F = 0. Only the letter grades are assigned for each course, A+ = A- = A = 4. However, the Grade Point Average averages the courses to produce a non-integer number. So if you get half A's and half B's, then GPA = 3.5.

Typically individual tests within a course are scored from 0 to 100, and at the end of the course, the prof decides what the cut offs are for each letter grade. An 80 in one course might be an A, while it might be a B in another course.

That said, be aware that individual schools may use different systems. My school had a five point system (A = 5) that I've never seen elsewhere. It's possible some schools assign something like 3.2 for a B+.

Berkeley uses a system where an A = A+ = 4.0, but an A- = 3.7, B+ = 3.3, B = 3.0, etc. Depending on the course, most grades are weighted on an absolute basis of some sort. Most classes in the business school are weighted on a subjective basis, and thus the cutoffs tend to be much tighter. You could get a 95% overall in accuracy, and still be considered a C student. Kind of unfair if your class just happened to consist of unusually bright business students, but c'est la vie.

Berkeley also weighs high school grades differently for admissions, putting honors classes on a 5.0 scale, compared to other classes on a 4.0 scale. Therefore, you could get Bs on all of your honors classes and still achieve what Berkeley would consider a 4.0 (and from what I understand, the ceiling on GPA is a 4.0).
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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5/5/2013 10:58:16 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
There is an A+?

In my education system (British-base, at least that is what the university claimed) the maximum grade point is A which is equal to 4:00 or 100 percent full score.
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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5/5/2013 11:04:16 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 10:58:16 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
There is an A+?

In my education system (British-base, at least that is what the university claimed) the maximum grade point is A which is equal to 4:00 or 100 percent full score.

wow. Up until now, I thought every school had A-, A, A+ as its grading system. I'd have a perfect GPA right now if we didn't have that system
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
lewis20
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5/5/2013 11:07:11 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
My buddy studied in Amsterdam, he said there his prof graded on a 100 scale but that students were never that good. That is that 90 was a paper that should be published and 100 was actual perfection and for most students 80 was the absolute best they could do.
That would suck.
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dylancatlow
Posts: 12,242
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5/5/2013 11:14:29 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:07:11 AM, lewis20 wrote:
My buddy studied in Amsterdam, he said there his prof graded on a 100 scale but that students were never that good. That is that 90 was a paper that should be published and 100 was actual perfection and for most students 80 was the absolute best they could do.
That would suck.

That's how it should be. Grade inflation is obnoxious.
lewis20
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5/5/2013 11:15:29 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
My school had non weighted 4.0 scale. I assume it's how most schools do it:
A+ & A 4.0
A- 3.66
B+ 3.33
B 3.0
B- 2.66
C+2.33
C 2.0
etc.

Though it's really BS that it wasn't weighted, our Valedictorian took basic classes while the kids who took mid level college math were stuck with the grades they got.
"If you are a racist I will attack you with the north"- Abraham Lincoln

"Do not wear clothing woven of two kinds of material" - Leviticus 19 19

"War is a racket" - Smedley Butler
dylancatlow
Posts: 12,242
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5/5/2013 11:38:04 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I really regret not going the AP route. I'm in IB, and its pedagogy is hardly suited for any actual learning. I don't know where all this nonsense about it being so rigorous comes from.
suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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5/5/2013 12:33:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:15:29 AM, lewis20 wrote:
My school had non weighted 4.0 scale. I assume it's how most schools do it:
A+ & A 4.0
A- 3.66
B+ 3.33
B 3.0
B- 2.66
C+2.33
C 2.0
etc.

Though it's really BS that it wasn't weighted, our Valedictorian took basic classes while the kids who took mid level college math were stuck with the grades they got.

mine is using 0.25 scale
suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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5/5/2013 12:36:30 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:38:04 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
I really regret not going the AP route. I'm in IB, and its pedagogy is hardly suited for any actual learning. I don't know where all this nonsense about it being so rigorous comes from.

As in Investment Banking? Why? I thought that the best route you could possibly go with fiance.
dylancatlow
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5/5/2013 12:39:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 12:36:30 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
At 5/5/2013 11:38:04 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
I really regret not going the AP route. I'm in IB, and its pedagogy is hardly suited for any actual learning. I don't know where all this nonsense about it being so rigorous comes from.

As in Investment Banking? Why? I thought that the best route you could possibly go with fiance.

Haha, no, I'm only 17. IB as in International Baccalaureate. http://www.ibo.org...
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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5/5/2013 1:49:50 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:15:29 AM, lewis20 wrote:
My school had non weighted 4.0 scale. I assume it's how most schools do it:
A+ & A 4.0
A- 3.66
B+ 3.33
B 3.0
B- 2.66
C+2.33
C 2.0
etc.

Though it's really BS that it wasn't weighted, our Valedictorian took basic classes while the kids who took mid level college math were stuck with the grades they got.

My high school during my year had 2 valedictorians. Both of them took every honors class possible, and got an A in every single course they took in high school. Basically they had an optimal GPA.

We also had over 160 salutatorians. These people had a 4.0 or above GPA, given that honors classes were weighted on a 5.0 scale.

My school has an almost sickening reputation of producing a gigantic number of straight-A students.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
wrichcirw
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5/5/2013 1:53:07 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:07:11 AM, lewis20 wrote:
My buddy studied in Amsterdam, he said there his prof graded on a 100 scale but that students were never that good. That is that 90 was a paper that should be published and 100 was actual perfection and for most students 80 was the absolute best they could do.
That would suck.

It depends. Was 80 an A?

If the course is weighted, the prof has latitude on what he/she considers A material.

For example, we had a first-time lecturer on my course on public policy who administered the latter portion of the course (the first portion was taught by IMHO future nobel-laureate Emmanuel Saez). The average grade on the final was a 50/150, because the noob wrote the final, and it had everything to do with his dissertation, and nothing to do with what he taught in class. A 65/150 on that test would have earned you an A on that test.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
YYW
Posts: 36,252
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5/5/2013 7:10:35 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I've heard of high schools using 5 pt grading scales, to accommodate for the differences between AP and non-AP classes. I take issue with that only because while I agree that AP classes ought to count "more" than non-AP classes, I also think that AP should be the bare minimal standard. That's a controversial view, I know... but I'm not bothered by it.

My department (at a university) has a very satisfactory grading scale such that only a certain percentage of students (usually 5-15%) can get A's, only a certain percentage of students (usually around 15-20%) will receive B's, and the rest will either get C's or fail. That is not to say that at least 5-15% will get A's, but that no more than 5-15% will be eligible to receive the highest marks.

The A+/- difference is absurd though, in my opinion. Let an A be an A. It did always irritate me when, as a high school student, I might get a 99, and another student would get a 100. I asked one of my teachers to explain why the other student's work was better than mine. That said, it was worth the lower score just to watch the teacher try to justify his grading decisions.
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RoyLatham
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5/5/2013 7:38:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Colleges have a tough time figuring out the grading systems in different schools. Even if two schools use the same system, one may grade easier than the other. Class rank is helpful and so are standardized tests. I'm just guessing, but I'll bet written recommendations count for more than colleges admit.

I knew a kid in college who went from incoming freshman to PhD in mathematics in three years. He had all A's except for a B in archeology. He had worked hard on the course, so he went to see the prof. The prof told him that he knew an A when he saw one, and he hadn't had a student who deserved an A in over a year. That's gotta hurt.
Enji
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5/5/2013 7:43:59 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 7:38:41 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
Colleges have a tough time figuring out the grading systems in different schools. Even if two schools use the same system, one may grade easier than the other. Class rank is helpful and so are standardized tests. I'm just guessing, but I'll bet written recommendations count for more than colleges admit.

I would agree that high school GPA isn't particularly important, but I don't think teacher recommendations count for all that much (alternatively my teachers wrote a bunch of bs about me or my college was desperate for female engineers - now that I think about it, it's probably the latter).
Thaddeus
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5/5/2013 7:57:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:07:11 AM, lewis20 wrote:
My buddy studied in Amsterdam, he said there his prof graded on a 100 scale but that students were never that good. That is that 90 was a paper that should be published and 100 was actual perfection and for most students 80 was the absolute best they could do.
That would suck.

That's the system at British universities. At my university (admittedly one of the best) 60-70 is one of the clever people half arsing it, or the above average putting in a decent effort. 70-75 is a decent amount of effort from clever people, and a sh1tload from above average. Above 75 isn't obtainable for most people in essay based subjects.
Thaddeus
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5/5/2013 7:58:32 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/5/2013 11:38:04 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
I really regret not going the AP route. I'm in IB, and its pedagogy is hardly suited for any actual learning. I don't know where all this nonsense about it being so rigorous comes from.

I'd did IB. Its alright.