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College Majors and Minors

Homeslice
Posts: 24
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6/30/2013 9:02:20 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Hi all. Im in HS and im beginning to think about college! Damnit! Well I was just thinking about what I want to do with my life. I figured I wanted to go to college for 4 topics:

-Bussiness
-Education
-Economics
-Politcal Sciences

I dont really have a good idea of a lot of this yet, just looking ahead into the (distant?) future, hoping to figure out a little more of what I want to do in college.

I want to major in Economics, because im pretty sure (Not positive though, let me know if im wrong here!), that this is safest bet for landing a job out of college and getting a high paying job. Economics isnt exactly something I want to be doing my whole life, but It will certainly be useful in whatever I decide to do.

I was also thinking I want to get an MBA. So for this, would I have to get a bachelors degree before going to a school for my MBA? Not sure about that, please clarify. So if I do that, I would have to double major, which brings me to the bigger question:

I figured in addition the the MBA and the Economics major, for what I want to do with my life I want knowledge in education and political sciences. Would it be okay to have 2 majors AND 2 minors, or would that just be too much?

So to sum up my questions:

Is 2 majors and 2 minors too much?

Does an MBA program require a bachelors degree in BA?

Thanks "homeslices."
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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7/3/2013 1:33:06 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
2 majors and 2 minors is totally doable. It just takes effort and good credit management.

My friend is doing that and I'm doing 2 majors (Econ and Poli-Sci) and a minor.

So go for it!
Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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7/3/2013 12:32:19 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Social sciences aren't exactly the epitome of the "safest bet."

If you are dedicated, science is an excellent option, with a much greater learning potential, job security, and respect.

Then again, if you're going into science, you need to at least get a Masters (preferably PhD).
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
airmax1227
Posts: 13,228
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7/4/2013 3:45:35 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/30/2013 9:02:20 PM, Homeslice wrote:
Hi all. Im in HS and im beginning to think about college! Damnit! Well I was just thinking about what I want to do with my life. I figured I wanted to go to college for 4 topics:

-Bussiness
-Education
-Economics
-Politcal Sciences


All are reasonable fields. You'll be fine with a bachelors in any of these, but you need to ask yourself in the future what you'd actually like to be doing.

I dont really have a good idea of a lot of this yet, just looking ahead into the (distant?) future, hoping to figure out a little more of what I want to do in college.

I want to major in Economics, because im pretty sure (Not positive though, let me know if im wrong here!), that this is safest bet for landing a job out of college and getting a high paying job. Economics isnt exactly something I want to be doing my whole life, but It will certainly be useful in whatever I decide to do.


Either a B.A or a B.S. (I'd recommend the BS) in econ is a good plan, but once again you need to ask yourself where you want to go with it. The truth is even if you are educated in a specific field you might find yourself doing something completely different 10 years down the road.

I was also thinking I want to get an MBA. So for this, would I have to get a bachelors degree before going to a school for my MBA? Not sure about that, please clarify. So if I do that, I would have to double major, which brings me to the bigger question:


There are 5 year MBA programs available. This isn't as common though as doing a 4 year bachelors and then a 2 year MBA program. You wouldn't need to double major, and it's not really necessary anyway. What I'd recommend (as opposed to what I did) is choose something different from business to get your bachelors in if you are seeking an MBA. Econ would work fine, but since you expressed an interest in education, I would actually recommend that. Work hard, get very good grades, and get into an MBA program (in 9/10 cases I personally wouldn't recommend going into the program right after finishing undergrad.). With the education background (or really any decent field, especially a science) and an MBA you should have decent job prospects after graduating.

I figured in addition the the MBA and the Economics major, for what I want to do with my life I want knowledge in education and political sciences. Would it be okay to have 2 majors AND 2 minors, or would that just be too much?


I personally don't think it's necessary, but it doesn't hurt. As I said above, consider choosing a non-business related field to get your degree in (be prepared to actually work in that field) and then go for the MBA. Minor in whatever other field interests you.

So to sum up my questions:

Is 2 majors and 2 minors too much?

Depends on the person. The question should be focused on what the goal is though.

Does an MBA program require a bachelors degree in BA?

No. But it doesn't hurt in the sense that you will be more familiar with the courses (although the focus is different). On the other hand, there is value in specifically getting an undergrad degree in a different field. Having both by double majoring is worth considering.

Thanks "homeslices."
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YYW
Posts: 36,243
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7/4/2013 11:32:12 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/30/2013 9:02:20 PM, Homeslice wrote:
Hi all. Im in HS and im beginning to think about college! Damnit! Well I was just thinking about what I want to do with my life. I figured I wanted to go to college for 4 topics:

-Bussiness (Good)
-Education (Good if teaching is something you enjoy)
-Economics (Good if you want to pursue a graduate degree in something related to it, but not employable on its own)
-Politcal Sciences (avoid this)

I dont really have a good idea of a lot of this yet, just looking ahead into the (distant?) future, hoping to figure out a little more of what I want to do in college.

I want to major in Economics, because im pretty sure (Not positive though, let me know if im wrong here!), that this is safest bet for landing a job out of college and getting a high paying job. Economics isnt exactly something I want to be doing my whole life, but It will certainly be useful in whatever I decide to do.

I was also thinking I want to get an MBA. So for this, would I have to get a bachelors degree before going to a school for my MBA? Not sure about that, please clarify. So if I do that, I would have to double major, which brings me to the bigger question:

I figured in addition the the MBA and the Economics major, for what I want to do with my life I want knowledge in education and political sciences. Would it be okay to have 2 majors AND 2 minors, or would that just be too much?

While it is possible to do two majors and two minors it's not practical for most people who want to maintain a balance between college and life.

So to sum up my questions:

Is 2 majors and 2 minors too much?

Does an MBA program require a bachelors degree in BA?

Thanks "homeslices."

As Airmax said, go with the BS.
royalpaladin
Posts: 22,357
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7/4/2013 3:42:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Finance and business are better than economics, which is beginning to look less practical. Employers are beginning to dislike theoretical majors.
royalpaladin
Posts: 22,357
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7/4/2013 3:45:07 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Within the past year, I have come to realize that college is just a stepping stone. It's an investment. Unless you are going to inherit a fortune, make sure you are using it to pursue something practical.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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7/4/2013 6:47:01 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/4/2013 3:45:07 PM, royalpaladin wrote:
Within the past year, I have come to realize that college is just a stepping stone. It's an investment. Unless you are going to inherit a fortune, make sure you are using it to pursue something practical.

Ah, I see. And that "academic" stuff, that sh!t is outdated, amirite?
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
jhops400
Posts: 5
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10/9/2013 6:23:11 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Once you are in that stage of your academic career that is when you are doing your bachelors degree, and you come on the stage when you have to choose your majors you should make sure that you have an interest in that field like Marketing, Accounting, Human Resource or IT. You need to have interest in it so that you can willingly complete it. http://www.universaldegrees.com...
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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10/9/2013 7:20:59 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I think the idea of majoring in something that has to be "practical" is a little bit misguided. I think there's a tendency of undergraduates to overestimate how much of what they use will actually go into their career. I'm not sure how much it actually varies from major to major though, on the difference between what you actually use for your career and actually learn in college.

For example, if you major in computer science, the stuff you learn will actually be useful for what you do in your job. However, for me, I don't think of much I learned in college is anything related to what I do. I majored in chemical engineering and I'm now a chemical lab tech. While it might seem like I'm working in a field similar to my major, truth is practically nothing I learned in college helps for my job. Even asking other employers during the interview process on how much of what they learned in college applies to the job, they all replied with not much really.

I also discussed this with my brother, on how much of his degree in computational biology helped w/ his first job (which was a research assistant). He again applied w/ not much really.

This all seems to support the theory that employers care about college majors due to the human signalling it creates, namely that you are smart, able to learn quickly, and show that you are a self-starter.

However, it is true that some majors, people receive higher salaries then others, so its best to check the average salary of people in your major. Although remember that average =/= what you're salary will be.

Bryan caplan has a great article on this:

http://econlog.econlib.org...

tl;dr what you learn in school is worthless, but the degree isn't.
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Cermank
Posts: 3,773
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10/9/2013 7:39:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/9/2013 7:20:59 AM, darkkermit wrote:
I think the idea of majoring in something that has to be "practical" is a little bit misguided. I think there's a tendency of undergraduates to overestimate how much of what they use will actually go into their career. I'm not sure how much it actually varies from major to major though, on the difference between what you actually use for your career and actually learn in college.

For example, if you major in computer science, the stuff you learn will actually be useful for what you do in your job. However, for me, I don't think of much I learned in college is anything related to what I do. I majored in chemical engineering and I'm now a chemical lab tech. While it might seem like I'm working in a field similar to my major, truth is practically nothing I learned in college helps for my job. Even asking other employers during the interview process on how much of what they learned in college applies to the job, they all replied with not much really.

I also discussed this with my brother, on how much of his degree in computational biology helped w/ his first job (which was a research assistant). He again applied w/ not much really.

This all seems to support the theory that employers care about college majors due to the human signalling it creates, namely that you are smart, able to learn quickly, and show that you are a self-starter.

However, it is true that some majors, people receive higher salaries then others, so its best to check the average salary of people in your major. Although remember that average =/= what you're salary will be.

Bryan caplan has a great article on this:

http://econlog.econlib.org...

tl;dr what you learn in school is worthless, but the degree isn't.

This.

Although what you chose as a major should generally also depend on your interests. I have seen people getting disinterested/ changing majors midway because they couldn't face the prospect of studying the same subject for the remaining years.

So your ideal major/ minor should take into account the social value of the major, the average salary and your interest.