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Literary Staples in the Education System

jennabarzak
Posts: 8
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12/2/2013 10:46:42 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
There are classics, of course, that many schools require students to read. For example, The Great Gatsby, Shakespeare, To Kill a Mockingbird, etc.

What are some literary works you believe belong in this category? Personally, mine is The Catcher in the Rye. My favorite novel without a doubt and it changed the way I perceived life. I believe it's a must-read for all young adults, or people for that matter.
I like fruit and reading. Be my friend.
Andromeda_Z
Posts: 4,151
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12/3/2013 10:49:09 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/2/2013 10:46:42 PM, jennabarzak wrote:
There are classics, of course, that many schools require students to read. For example, The Great Gatsby, Shakespeare, To Kill a Mockingbird, etc.

What are some literary works you believe belong in this category? Personally, mine is The Catcher in the Rye. My favorite novel without a doubt and it changed the way I perceived life. I believe it's a must-read for all young adults, or people for that matter.

Half the people that are forced to read Shakespeare can't understand half of it, not everyone loves the Catcher in the Rye as much as you do, and there are a few other things that I just can't understand why they're considered "classics". I love reading, but I think care should be taken to ensure the students are actually interested in reading the books. Maybe a good assignment would be to let a student choose a book, read it, and then have them argue in an essay that it does have literary value? That sort of assignment would not only get them reading and thinking, but also have them understand what makes a good book a good book. Plus it basically rules out them choosing a "lazy" book, because then how are they going to do the assignment?
jennabarzak
Posts: 8
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12/3/2013 11:09:49 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/3/2013 10:49:09 AM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
At 12/2/2013 10:46:42 PM, jennabarzak wrote:
There are classics, of course, that many schools require students to read. For example, The Great Gatsby, Shakespeare, To Kill a Mockingbird, etc.

What are some literary works you believe belong in this category? Personally, mine is The Catcher in the Rye. My favorite novel without a doubt and it changed the way I perceived life. I believe it's a must-read for all young adults, or people for that matter.

Half the people that are forced to read Shakespeare can't understand half of it, not everyone loves the Catcher in the Rye as much as you do, and there are a few other things that I just can't understand why they're considered "classics". I love reading, but I think care should be taken to ensure the students are actually interested in reading the books. Maybe a good assignment would be to let a student choose a book, read it, and then have them argue in an essay that it does have literary value? That sort of assignment would not only get them reading and thinking, but also have them understand what makes a good book a good book. Plus it basically rules out them choosing a "lazy" book, because then how are they going to do the assignment?

I think you're missing the point of what I was asking. I wasn't saying "Oh this is the best book ever, I demand that public education systems use it in their curriculum!" and I wasn't saying that all "classics" are great, but most of them usually are used in the education system today. This is merely a discussion of which novels you feel could be beneficial to students or novels you consider classics. I do agree with your point that literature shouldn't be shoved down students' throats; they should be able to explore the literary world and learn for themselves what interests them.
I like fruit and reading. Be my friend.