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Grade systems in English-speaking countries

espoir
Posts: 6
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12/23/2013 10:46:32 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Hi!

In Sweden we have just a while ago changed the grade system to A, B, C, D, E, F. I thought it would be the same system as the system in English speaking countries. However it seems to be quite different still, and I would be glad if someone could try to explain what every letter stands for, for kind of grade. In Sweden A is the highest, B is quite high, C is average, D is quite low, E is lower and F is when you fail.
KingDebater
Posts: 687
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12/23/2013 2:33:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/23/2013 10:46:32 AM, espoir wrote:
Hi!

In Sweden we have just a while ago changed the grade system to A, B, C, D, E, F. I thought it would be the same system as the system in English speaking countries. However it seems to be quite different still, and I would be glad if someone could try to explain what every letter stands for, for kind of grade. In Sweden A is the highest, B is quite high, C is average, D is quite low, E is lower and F is when you fail.
In the part of England I live in:
A = 5 points
B = 12 points
C = 7 points
D = 2 points
E = 3 points

Then, P^5-3P and that's your score. The one with the highest wins.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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12/24/2013 12:10:31 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
There is no standard grading system in the United States. Wikipedia explains a bunch of variations: http://en.wikipedia.org... In one system, the top 7% of the class is an A and the bottom 7% is F. The letter E is almost never used as a grade. It's A, B, C, D, F. To compute averages, they are assigned 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 respectively.

My college had a weird five point system. A is worth 5.0, B = 4.0, C = 3.0, D = 1.0, and F = 0.0.

The Wikipedia article describes an 11 point system.