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Ideal Degree/Education Path for me

Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/3/2014 11:36:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Now, I would like to thank anyone who responds, This is a purely personal matter, and I understand a lot of people don't care and I don't intend to force them.

Now before I start let me tell you my grades. My GPA, is pretty pathetic, due to a multitude of family reasons and my slothfulness I under-preformed in school and got a poor GPA. 2.7 unweighted, 3.2 weighted(this will be higher as I have done much better my senior year, but it's a tad late). My ACT is 27(I believe I can get higher, but since my GPA disqualifies me for most of the "good" scholarships and also disqualifies me from most of the good universities, I have not really desired to spend the money to take it again).

Here are my paths:

1. Go to community college for 1-2 years, do well there or else, and transfer to a 4-year university and get my actual degree there.
2. Enlist in the military(not sure which branch, but the Army has actually brought me in and offered me several things to try and enlist), serve, and then go to a university and have most of my tuition paid off.
3. Go to a vocational school and become an HVAC technician, plumber or something. I am not too optimistic about this path.

Degrees I am actually considering, not subjects that necessarily interest me(Let me preface this by saying I am awful at math):
Economics- This field actually interests me, and along with my political and philosophical interests.
Law- I have always loved debate, but I have heard horrible things about law school and actually being a lawyer.
Meteorology- Weather fascinates me. Bad side, is of course, I am awful at math.
Something related with Computers, Engineering or Programming maybe- I could actually receive support from people I know in real life when studying this, but again, awful at math.

What exactly would you suggest is the best path? I am absolutely determined not to accrue student debt.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/4/2014 12:46:45 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I am also starting to believe that, despite my inferiority at math, it may just be best to get better at it and get a computer science degree.
nummi
Posts: 294
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2/4/2014 7:03:33 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Just find what you are good at what, what you like, what fits you, and what you want to do, and what makes you happy. And go for it. It's that simple.

"Official" education is not even necessary, you can learn independently, on your own. I do. This way you only expend your time on subjects and material you need; no waste of time on things you'll never need. (This works best for some particular areas.)
In schools they subject everyone to waste their time and energy on subjects and matters they do not need for their job in the future, nor even in their life in general. Goal would be avoiding such waste of time and life and energy which only creates unneeded and unnecessary stress.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/4/2014 5:49:42 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 7:03:33 AM, nummi wrote:
Just find what you are good at what, what you like, what fits you, and what you want to do, and what makes you happy. And go for it. It's that simple.

"Official" education is not even necessary, you can learn independently, on your own. I do. This way you only expend your time on subjects and material you need; no waste of time on things you'll never need. (This works best for some particular areas.)
In schools they subject everyone to waste their time and energy on subjects and matters they do not need for their job in the future, nor even in their life in general. Goal would be avoiding such waste of time and life and energy which only creates unneeded and unnecessary stress.
While agree alot of what you actually learn in class in college may be useless, the degree isn't. The degree gets you the interview and makes you look much better than other candidates.

And while I would love to get a philosophy or history degree, I would also like to not be crushed by debt.
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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2/4/2014 7:57:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/3/2014 11:36:37 PM, Clarity wrote:
Now, I would like to thank anyone who responds, This is a purely personal matter, and I understand a lot of people don't care and I don't intend to force them.

Now before I start let me tell you my grades. My GPA, is pretty pathetic, due to a multitude of family reasons and my slothfulness I under-preformed in school and got a poor GPA. 2.7 unweighted, 3.2 weighted(this will be higher as I have done much better my senior year, but it's a tad late). My ACT is 27(I believe I can get higher, but since my GPA disqualifies me for most of the "good" scholarships and also disqualifies me from most of the good universities, I have not really desired to spend the money to take it again).

Here are my paths:

1. Go to community college for 1-2 years, do well there or else, and transfer to a 4-year university and get my actual degree there.
2. Enlist in the military(not sure which branch, but the Army has actually brought me in and offered me several things to try and enlist), serve, and then go to a university and have most of my tuition paid off.
3. Go to a vocational school and become an HVAC technician, plumber or something. I am not too optimistic about this path.

Degrees I am actually considering, not subjects that necessarily interest me(Let me preface this by saying I am awful at math):
Economics- This field actually interests me, and along with my political and philosophical interests.
Law- I have always loved debate, but I have heard horrible things about law school and actually being a lawyer.
Meteorology- Weather fascinates me. Bad side, is of course, I am awful at math.
Something related with Computers, Engineering or Programming maybe- I could actually receive support from people I know in real life when studying this, but again, awful at math.

What exactly would you suggest is the best path? I am absolutely determined not to accrue student debt.

If you're awful at math or don't like math, then economics isn't something for you. If you want to test your interest in computer programming you can go on Udacity.com and see if your interested in it. Your first year in college can just be dedicated to gen eds if your undecided. There's also no shame in going to vocational school anyways. Most jobs are dull and boring. That's why you get paid to do it.
Open borders debate:
http://www.debate.org...
nummi
Posts: 294
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2/5/2014 5:41:46 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 5:49:42 PM, Clarity wrote:
At 2/4/2014 7:03:33 AM, nummi wrote:
Just find what you are good at what, what you like, what fits you, and what you want to do, and what makes you happy. And go for it. It's that simple.

"Official" education is not even necessary, you can learn independently, on your own. I do. This way you only expend your time on subjects and material you need; no waste of time on things you'll never need. (This works best for some particular areas.)
In schools they subject everyone to waste their time and energy on subjects and matters they do not need for their job in the future, nor even in their life in general. Goal would be avoiding such waste of time and life and energy which only creates unneeded and unnecessary stress.
While agree alot of what you actually learn in class in college may be useless, the degree isn't. The degree gets you the interview and makes you look much better than other candidates.
The degree does not determine whether one actually has the necessary knowledge and experience or not. There are so many people with degrees who in truth are total morons. When applying for a job degree should decide nothing at all; what should decide is whether the person actually has the necessary knowledge and experience needed.

And while I would love to get a philosophy or history degree, I would also like to not be crushed by debt.
Philosophy and history, the way they are taught and what is taught in schools is mostly completely useless and pointless in life.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/5/2014 4:35:30 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 7:57:16 PM, darkkermit wrote:
If you're awful at math or don't like math, then economics isn't something for you. If you want to test your interest in computer programming you can go on Udacity.com and see if your interested in it. Your first year in college can just be dedicated to gen eds if your undecided. There's also no shame in going to vocational school anyways. Most jobs are dull and boring. That's why you get paid to do it.

Yes, but computer programming is just as if not more math heavy than economics. Vocational school does not guarantee much pay, and I have no idea how much it costs.

There is a third path though, pharmacy, which my local community college has a special transfer program with a (relatively)good college.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/5/2014 4:36:38 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
The degree does not determine whether one actually has the necessary knowledge and experience or not. There are so many people with degrees who in truth are total morons. When applying for a job degree should decide nothing at all; what should decide is whether the person actually has the necessary knowledge and experience needed.
That is how it should be. That is not how it is.
Philosophy and history, the way they are taught and what is taught in schools is mostly completely useless and pointless in life.
Not really no, but they have very little marketable value.
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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2/5/2014 5:28:18 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/5/2014 4:35:30 PM, Clarity wrote:
At 2/4/2014 7:57:16 PM, darkkermit wrote:
If you're awful at math or don't like math, then economics isn't something for you. If you want to test your interest in computer programming you can go on Udacity.com and see if your interested in it. Your first year in college can just be dedicated to gen eds if your undecided. There's also no shame in going to vocational school anyways. Most jobs are dull and boring. That's why you get paid to do it.

Yes, but computer programming is just as if not more math heavy than economics. Vocational school does not guarantee much pay, and I have no idea how much it costs.

Neither does any degree. Programming isn't exactly math though, although its similar to math, and people that are good at math are also good at programming. But that's not necessary true. Programming is more logic based.

There is a third path though, pharmacy, which my local community college has a special transfer program with a (relatively)good college.
Open borders debate:
http://www.debate.org...
Roudy-Trucker
Posts: 4
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2/5/2014 6:47:12 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Look kid, ive been driving across America for over 25 years. Im on the road now.

You definitely are not fit for the military. They are drawing down anyways and you'd probably get stuck in a reserve unit. Formal college is not your thing, your grades suck. Truck driving has allowed me to pursue multiple degrees online while driving. I've learned a lot and done it while making money driving. Have the laptop in my lap while on the road. I have an online business and multiple investment degrees. I'm making 6 figures with a high-school education. You should drop out of school now, get your license, and start truck driving. Look at online degrees and before you know it you will be bringing in 250k a year or more...my business is growing and my investments are churning.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/5/2014 11:32:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/5/2014 5:28:18 PM, darkkermit wrote:
Neither does any degree. Programming isn't exactly math though, although its similar to math, and people that are good at math are also good at programming. But that's not necessary true. Programming is more logic based.
There are some relatively safe degrees. CS, Pharmacy, Law(if you go to a good one) and a couple others are pretty safe economically speaking. Business degrees are the ones where you essentially wing it, and liberal arts degrees don't do much of anything.

Programming is logic debased, yes, but it is much more akin to math than say, debate, and still requires heavy calculus courses to get the degree regardless.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/5/2014 11:38:02 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/5/2014 6:47:12 PM, Roudy-Trucker wrote:
Look kid, ive been driving across America for over 25 years. Im on the road now.
I hope you aren't typing on your laptop while driving. At least that's what I got from this.
You definitely are not fit for the military.
I would love for you to elaborate but you don't.
They are drawing down anyways and you'd probably get stuck in a reserve unit.
That's not what I've been told. I mean, they're scaling down, but I wouldn't enlist as an infantryman or some such.
Formal college is not your thing, your grades suck.
I have heard of plenty of people succeeding in college even with bad grades. I am actually luckier than most since my community college has wonderful transfer programs.
Truck driving has allowed me to pursue multiple degrees online while driving.
"While driving?" I also have not heard any good things about online education.
I've learned a lot and done it while making money driving.
Well,, I am happy for you. You are currently in a better position than I, depending on what you mean by a lot.
Have the laptop in my lap while on the road.
I really hope this doesn't mean what I think it does.
have an online business and multiple investment degrees. I'm making 6 figures with a high-school education.
You may have gotten lucky, because I have heard of absolutely no positives in getting online degrees.
You should drop out of school now,
High school? Yeah, uh, no.
get your license, and start truck driving. Look at online degrees and before you know it you will be bringing in 250k a year or more...my business is growing and my investments are churning.
Forgive me but I am a bit cynical about this situation.
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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2/6/2014 12:04:52 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Clarity, if you haven't selected a four year college or another career path by the time you've graduated, I recommend that you enroll in a community college for fall quarter/semester as soon as possible and just select "undeclared" or something else as your major, just so that you still pursue a higher education.

Yes, you can go on to do something else with your life that doesn't require college, but it seems like you have your eye on Computer Science right now, so I recommend that you at the very least enroll in a community college, if not a four-year college.
Roudy-Trucker
Posts: 4
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2/6/2014 10:02:38 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/5/2014 11:38:02 PM, Clarity wrote:
At 2/5/2014 6:47:12 PM, Roudy-Trucker wrote:
Look kid, ive been driving across America for over 25 years. Im on the road now.
I hope you aren't typing on your laptop while driving. At least that's what I got from this.
You definitely are not fit for the military.
I would love for you to elaborate but you don't.
They are drawing down anyways and you'd probably get stuck in a reserve unit.
That's not what I've been told. I mean, they're scaling down, but I wouldn't enlist as an infantryman or some such.
Formal college is not your thing, your grades suck.
I have heard of plenty of people succeeding in college even with bad grades. I am actually luckier than most since my community college has wonderful transfer programs.
Truck driving has allowed me to pursue multiple degrees online while driving.
"While driving?" I also have not heard any good things about online education.
I've learned a lot and done it while making money driving.
Well,, I am happy for you. You are currently in a better position than I, depending on what you mean by a lot.
Have the laptop in my lap while on the road.
I really hope this doesn't mean what I think it does.
have an online business and multiple investment degrees. I'm making 6 figures with a high-school education.
You may have gotten lucky, because I have heard of absolutely no positives in getting online degrees.
You should drop out of school now,
High school? Yeah, uh, no.
get your license, and start truck driving. Look at online degrees and before you know it you will be bringing in 250k a year or more...my business is growing and my investments are churning.
Forgive me but I am a bit cynical about this situation.

You seem like a bright kid. Might try a two year degree at your community college and then try to transfer and get into the military so you have options. To each his own. We all find our own way. Mine happened to be truck driving and working on my laptop while on the road. Good luck
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/6/2014 4:40:21 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/6/2014 12:04:52 AM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
Clarity, if you haven't selected a four year college or another career path by the time you've graduated, I recommend that you enroll in a community college for fall quarter/semester as soon as possible and just select "undeclared" or something else as your major, just so that you still pursue a higher education.

Yes, you can go on to do something else with your life that doesn't require college, but it seems like you have your eye on Computer Science right now, so I recommend that you at the very least enroll in a community college, if not a four-year college.
That is most likely what I am going to do.My community college has programs that allow guaranteed transfer to relatively good universities.
Clarity
Posts: 46
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2/6/2014 4:41:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/6/2014 10:02:38 AM, Roudy-Trucker wrote:
You seem like a bright kid. Might try a two year degree at your community college and then try to transfer and get into the military so you have options. To each his own. We all find our own way. Mine happened to be truck driving and working on my laptop while on the road. Good luck

I will most likely try community college, to test my options.

Anyway, good luck to you as well.
kiryasjoelvillage
Posts: 190
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2/26/2014 3:09:04 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 7:03:33 AM, nummi wrote:
Just find what you are good at what, what you like, what fits you, and what you want to do, and what makes you happy. And go for it. It's that simple.

"Official" education is not even necessary, you can learn independently, on your own. I do. This way you only expend your time on subjects and material you need; no waste of time on things you'll never need. (This works best for some particular areas.)
In schools they subject everyone to waste their time and energy on subjects and matters they do not need for their job in the future, nor even in their life in general. Goal would be avoiding such waste of time and life and energy which only creates unneeded and unnecessary stress.
It is never necessary to have a degree in education,There are lot of feilds in which you can make your career like-arts,thetar etc.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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3/3/2014 6:52:36 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
From what you've said, I think you should go to community college. You have an interest in things that require math, and community college will give you a chance to develop skills in that area. If you do well you can transfer to a two-year school. Community college also gives the opportunity to switch career directions if you discover something you really like. The military is fine, but I doubt they would be so flexible in changing directions. Vocational schools will give you employable job skills, but you have interests in things that require four-year degrees. Community college keeps those options open.

You should seek every degree and certificate you can. You can learn all the stuff without them, but employers want some evidence that you achieved goals. You can make up not having a degree by building a record of achievement, but it's more difficult to do it that way. Formal curricula also teaches things that you don't know you need to know.

Math is not important for most computer science. There are computer specialties where it is important, but not for 99% of it. I've programmed, managed many programmers, and have an advanced degree in math. You can be top-notch software engineer with only basic math.