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Science, Philosophy, & Art degrees

DanT
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2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
Jack212
Posts: 572
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2/7/2014 9:03:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

1. Knowledge of what? If you want to know about Economics, for example, then Science isn't the answer.

2. Philosophy doesn't make you wise, only life experience does that.

3. What skill? An art degree won't make you an engineer, will it?
DanT
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2/8/2014 7:35:50 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/7/2014 9:03:16 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

1. Knowledge of what? If you want to know about Economics, for example, then Science isn't the answer.

Economics is a science, which is why a Bachelors in Economics would be a BS. Way to show your ignorance.
2. Philosophy doesn't make you wise, only life experience does that.

Philosophy is the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a branch of knowledge. For example; a PHD (Philosophy Doctorates) in Physics would be a philosophy degree awarded to Physicists.

Wisdom is the ability to understand knowledge that one has obtained. For example; I may know that Money x it's Velocity = Nominal Output, but that does not mean I understand it's meaning. If I can dissect why M x V = P x Y, and I can explain the implications of it, than I have wisdom on the subject.

Wisdom is not only gained from life experience. Knowledge is gained from experience, and wisdom is gained from understanding that knowledge.

3. What skill? An art degree won't make you an engineer, will it?

The skill depends on the degree. I take it you never went to college, or even attempted to enroll. Science, Art, and Philosophy are the 3 main classifications for a degree program.

Art degrees don't just cover Fine Art, they also cover Liberal Arts, Humanities, and other subjects like Communication. A management degree could fall either in the art or the science category, depending on if the focus is on teaching knowledge of management or teaching management skills.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
Jack212
Posts: 572
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2/8/2014 5:09:49 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/8/2014 7:35:50 AM, DanT wrote:
At 2/7/2014 9:03:16 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

1. Knowledge of what? If you want to know about Economics, for example, then Science isn't the answer.

Economics is a science, which is why a Bachelors in Economics would be a BS. Way to show your ignorance.

Such a classification varies depending on the institution. Way to show your ignorance.

2. Philosophy doesn't make you wise, only life experience does that.

Philosophy is the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a branch of knowledge. For example; a PHD (Philosophy Doctorates) in Physics would be a philosophy degree awarded to Physicists.

Wisdom is the ability to understand knowledge that one has obtained. For example; I may know that Money x it's Velocity = Nominal Output, but that does not mean I understand it's meaning. If I can dissect why M x V = P x Y, and I can explain the implications of it, than I have wisdom on the subject.

Wisdom is not only gained from life experience. Knowledge is gained from experience, and wisdom is gained from understanding that knowledge.

Philosophy may have been that once, but the useful stuff has long since migrated to other disciplines, leaving nothing but pointless pseudo-intellectualism behind. Knowledge and wisdom are gained from learning and understanding the world, not from verbose stoners with tenure.

3. What skill? An art degree won't make you an engineer, will it?

The skill depends on the degree. I take it you never went to college, or even attempted to enroll. Science, Art, and Philosophy are the 3 main classifications for a degree program.

Doing it now, actually. Like I said before, classifications depend on the institution. Don't assume, it makes you look ignorant.
DanT
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2/8/2014 7:08:42 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/8/2014 5:09:49 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/8/2014 7:35:50 AM, DanT wrote:
At 2/7/2014 9:03:16 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

1. Knowledge of what? If you want to know about Economics, for example, then Science isn't the answer.

Economics is a science, which is why a Bachelors in Economics would be a BS. Way to show your ignorance.

Such a classification varies depending on the institution. Way to show your ignorance.

Name a college that does not classify economics as a science. I bet you can't name one.
2. Philosophy doesn't make you wise, only life experience does that.

Philosophy is the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a branch of knowledge. For example; a PHD (Philosophy Doctorates) in Physics would be a philosophy degree awarded to Physicists.

Wisdom is the ability to understand knowledge that one has obtained. For example; I may know that Money x it's Velocity = Nominal Output, but that does not mean I understand it's meaning. If I can dissect why M x V = P x Y, and I can explain the implications of it, than I have wisdom on the subject.

Wisdom is not only gained from life experience. Knowledge is gained from experience, and wisdom is gained from understanding that knowledge.

Philosophy may have been that once, but the useful stuff has long since migrated to other disciplines, leaving nothing but pointless pseudo-intellectualism behind. Knowledge and wisdom are gained from learning and understanding the world, not from verbose stoners with tenure.

Not only have you not refuted what I was saying, but you are making huge assumptions and generalizations.
3. What skill? An art degree won't make you an engineer, will it?

The skill depends on the degree. I take it you never went to college, or even attempted to enroll. Science, Art, and Philosophy are the 3 main classifications for a degree program.

Doing it now, actually. Like I said before, classifications depend on the institution. Don't assume, it makes you look ignorant.
Is your major general studies? Because other than degrees like "General Studies", most degrees are more focused that what you are depicting them as.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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2/8/2014 11:50:39 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

If you want to make money, a STEM-related degree is best.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
Jack212
Posts: 572
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2/9/2014 4:05:01 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/8/2014 7:08:42 PM, DanT wrote:
At 2/8/2014 5:09:49 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/8/2014 7:35:50 AM, DanT wrote:
At 2/7/2014 9:03:16 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

1. Knowledge of what? If you want to know about Economics, for example, then Science isn't the answer.

Economics is a science, which is why a Bachelors in Economics would be a BS. Way to show your ignorance.

Such a classification varies depending on the institution. Way to show your ignorance.

Name a college that does not classify economics as a science. I bet you can't name one.

In New Zealand, Economics is either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Commerce, but not a Bachelor of Science.

2. Philosophy doesn't make you wise, only life experience does that.

Philosophy is the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a branch of knowledge. For example; a PHD (Philosophy Doctorates) in Physics would be a philosophy degree awarded to Physicists.

Wisdom is the ability to understand knowledge that one has obtained. For example; I may know that Money x it's Velocity = Nominal Output, but that does not mean I understand it's meaning. If I can dissect why M x V = P x Y, and I can explain the implications of it, than I have wisdom on the subject.

Wisdom is not only gained from life experience. Knowledge is gained from experience, and wisdom is gained from understanding that knowledge.

Philosophy may have been that once, but the useful stuff has long since migrated to other disciplines, leaving nothing but pointless pseudo-intellectualism behind. Knowledge and wisdom are gained from learning and understanding the world, not from verbose stoners with tenure.

Not only have you not refuted what I was saying, but you are making huge assumptions and generalizations.

I refer you here, as this thread is more relevant to this point.

http://www.debate.org...

3. What skill? An art degree won't make you an engineer, will it?

The skill depends on the degree. I take it you never went to college, or even attempted to enroll. Science, Art, and Philosophy are the 3 main classifications for a degree program.

Doing it now, actually. Like I said before, classifications depend on the institution. Don't assume, it makes you look ignorant.
Is your major general studies? Because other than degrees like "General Studies", most degrees are more focused that what you are depicting them as.

I don't get what you're trying to say here, you're being too clever for me. Can you perhaps dumb it down a bit for us mere mortals to understand?
experteducationhelp
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2/11/2014 12:41:09 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I really agree with the post but I have chosen to complete my masters degree in marketing as specialization as I considered it as a science, a philosophy and also a creative degree which can enhance me to become a marketer and interact with the consumers and masses in future.
http://bit.ly...
DanT
Posts: 5,693
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2/11/2014 2:17:30 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/9/2014 4:05:01 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/8/2014 7:08:42 PM, DanT wrote:
At 2/8/2014 5:09:49 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/8/2014 7:35:50 AM, DanT wrote:
At 2/7/2014 9:03:16 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/4/2014 5:39:03 PM, DanT wrote:
If you want to acquire knowledge a science degree is best.
If you want to acquire wisdom a philosophy degree is best.
If you want to acquire a skill a art degree is best.

1. Knowledge of what? If you want to know about Economics, for example, then Science isn't the answer.

Economics is a science, which is why a Bachelors in Economics would be a BS. Way to show your ignorance.

Such a classification varies depending on the institution. Way to show your ignorance.

Name a college that does not classify economics as a science. I bet you can't name one.

In New Zealand, Economics is either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Commerce, but not a Bachelor of Science.

What New Zealand college?

I know Otago has both a "Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Economics" and a "Bachelor of Arts (BA) majoring in Economics"; therefore they classify economics as a science.
Canterbury has "Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Economics", a "Bachelor of Commerce (BCom) in Economics", and a "Bachelor of Arts (BA) majoring in Economics"; therefore they classify economics as a science.

Allow me to retort; name a college that does not classify economics as a science.

2. Philosophy doesn't make you wise, only life experience does that.

Philosophy is the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a branch of knowledge. For example; a PHD (Philosophy Doctorates) in Physics would be a philosophy degree awarded to Physicists.

Wisdom is the ability to understand knowledge that one has obtained. For example; I may know that Money x it's Velocity = Nominal Output, but that does not mean I understand it's meaning. If I can dissect why M x V = P x Y, and I can explain the implications of it, than I have wisdom on the subject.

Wisdom is not only gained from life experience. Knowledge is gained from experience, and wisdom is gained from understanding that knowledge.

Philosophy may have been that once, but the useful stuff has long since migrated to other disciplines, leaving nothing but pointless pseudo-intellectualism behind. Knowledge and wisdom are gained from learning and understanding the world, not from verbose stoners with tenure.

Not only have you not refuted what I was saying, but you are making huge assumptions and generalizations.

I refer you here, as this thread is more relevant to this point.

http://www.debate.org...
("Newton's Flaming Laser Sword is a philosophical razor, just like Occam's, that states:

'Anything that cannot be settled by experiment is not worth debating.

It means that if your question cannot be settled through observation, it is a stupid question no matter how sound your logical argument is. This is the essential difference between science and philosophy - the former is backed up by evidence and therefore useful, while the latter is a waste of time and brain power.'"~ Jack212
)

A.) That is a baseless assertion.
B.) Your logic is unsound. As Rational_Thinker9119 pointed out in your thread, the assertion is contradictory, because the method cannot be proved by experimentation.

3. What skill? An art degree won't make you an engineer, will it?

The skill depends on the degree. I take it you never went to college, or even attempted to enroll. Science, Art, and Philosophy are the 3 main classifications for a degree program.

Doing it now, actually. Like I said before, classifications depend on the institution. Don't assume, it makes you look ignorant.
Is your major general studies? Because other than degrees like "General Studies", most degrees are more focused that what you are depicting them as.

I don't get what you're trying to say here, you're being too clever for me. Can you perhaps dumb it down a bit for us mere mortals to understand?

People go to college to pave a career path; it is not like high school where fields are generalized and lumped together. There are no such thing as a "Degree in Art", there is such a thing as a "Degree of Art in [insert field]".
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
Jack212
Posts: 572
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2/11/2014 5:31:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/11/2014 2:17:30 PM, DanT wrote:

Allow me to retort; name a college that does not classify economics as a science.

Victoria. Economics is either a Bachelor of Commerce or a Bachelor of Arts.

Look, it doesn't really matter what it's classified as. We're arguing over two different defintions here. I interepreted your use of the word "science" to mean the Natural Sciences (with Psychology as sort of borderline) because that's what most people mean when they say "science". It's obvious now that you were using the word in a broader sense, so I apologise for the misunderstanding.

("Newton's Flaming Laser Sword is a philosophical razor, just like Occam's, that states:

'Anything that cannot be settled by experiment is not worth debating.

It means that if your question cannot be settled through observation, it is a stupid question no matter how sound your logical argument is. This is the essential difference between science and philosophy - the former is backed up by evidence and therefore useful, while the latter is a waste of time and brain power.'"~ Jack212
)

A.) That is a baseless assertion.
B.) Your logic is unsound. As Rational_Thinker9119 pointed out in your thread, the assertion is contradictory, because the method cannot be proved by experimentation.

As I stated on that thread, Newton's Flaiming Laser Sword does not attack a principle/claim per se. If you ask, "[logical argument], therefore, is X true?", then the Laser Sword will not answer the question for you. That is not how a razor works. Razors are applied to debates. So you would ask, "Is X true?", and the Laser Sword would say, "There is no way to test that, so this debate is a waste of my time." If we apply Newton's Laser Sword to the question, "Is Newton's Laser Sword valid?", then the answer is, "There is no way to test that, so this debate is a waste of my time."

There is no contradiction, provided you use the principle correctly.

People go to college to pave a career path; it is not like high school where fields are generalized and lumped together. There are no such thing as a "Degree in Art", there is such a thing as a "Degree of Art in [insert field]".

Many people go to university purely because it's the next step up from high school, and don't actually decide what they want to Major in until after they've farted around for a couple of years. Unless you're really passionate about a given field, it's often the best strategy to take, because you don't waste time studying stuff you're not interested in or not good at, and you've usually got a better idea of what you want to do with your life after tertiary study than before.

You're quibbling over the definition of "Art". "The Arts" includes all the creative subjects, while "Art" usually means drawing stuff.

I think we're mostly splitting hairs in this argument. To bring us back on topic, I'm going to restate your original point as I see it:

If you want to develop technical/analytical skills and learn how the world works, take a Science major.

If you want to develop creative/communication skills and learn how people work, take an Art major (Psychology and Economics can fit into either this or Science, depending on interpretation).

If you want to develop communication skills but not learn jack sh*t about anything important, take Philosophy.

That's my take. Over to you.
DanT
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2/11/2014 9:32:01 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/11/2014 5:31:37 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/11/2014 2:17:30 PM, DanT wrote:

Allow me to retort; name a college that does not classify economics as a science.

Victoria. Economics is either a Bachelor of Commerce or a Bachelor of Arts.

According to their website it is either a Bachelor of science in economics, a Bachelor of Arts in economics, or a Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics and Economics.
http://www.uvic.ca...

Look, it doesn't really matter what it's classified as. We're arguing over two different defintions here. I interepreted your use of the word "science" to mean the Natural Sciences (with Psychology as sort of borderline) because that's what most people mean when they say "science".
That is what most laymen mean. There are 3 main branches of science;
1.) Natural Science (a branch of science that deals with the physical world, e.g., physics, chemistry, geology, and biology.)
2.) Social Science (a branch of science that deals with human behavior and social interactions., e.g., psychology, sociology, and economics.)
3.) Formal Science (a branch of science that deals with theoretical formal systems., e.g., mathematics, linguistics, statistics, and computer science.)

It's obvious now that you were using the word in a broader sense, so I apologise for the misunderstanding.

Apology accepted, but given that I clarified the terms early on in the thread your semantic dispute should have never arisen.

("Newton's Flaming Laser Sword is a philosophical razor, just like Occam's, that states:

'Anything that cannot be settled by experiment is not worth debating.

It means that if your question cannot be settled through observation, it is a stupid question no matter how sound your logical argument is. This is the essential difference between science and philosophy - the former is backed up by evidence and therefore useful, while the latter is a waste of time and brain power.'"~ Jack212
)

A.) That is a baseless assertion.
B.) Your logic is unsound. As Rational_Thinker9119 pointed out in your thread, the assertion is contradictory, because the method cannot be proved by experimentation.

As I stated on that thread, Newton's Flaiming Laser Sword does not attack a principle/claim per se. If you ask, "[logical argument], therefore, is X true?", then the Laser Sword will not answer the question for you. That is not how a razor works. Razors are applied to debates. So you would ask, "Is X true?", and the Laser Sword would say, "There is no way to test that, so this debate is a waste of my time." If we apply Newton's Laser Sword to the question, "Is Newton's Laser Sword valid?", then the answer is, "There is no way to test that, so this debate is a waste of my time."

You stated in the OP that it is like Occam's Razor. According to Occam's Razor the the theory that makes the least assumptions is the correct one. Of course that is besides the point, because you attributed the meaning of Newton's flaming laser sword in your explanation. The term was coined by a mathematician (a formal scientist) in order to explain why scientists unlike philosophers, don't try to explain things that cannot be proven by observation or experimentation. If it cannot be proved by a posteriori knowledge. However Philosophers may use logic and reason to try to answer such questions via a priori knowledge.

One method philosophers use to determine whether a statement is true or false, is by using thought experiments (much like how Einstein deduced that e=mc^2). In fact an apple never fell on Newton's head; that was just a thought experiment.
Thought experiments use one's understanding of a known subject to draw a logical conclusion.

Personally I prefer Popper's falsifiability principle to Newton's flaming laser sword seeing as many scientific advancements including those by Newton contradicted the flaming laser sword.

There is no contradiction, provided you use the principle correctly.

According to Newton's flaming laser sword, as a scientist Newton's flaming laser sword is not worth debating, because it cannot be proven with a posteriori knowledge. Thus a scientist would not consider Newton's flaming laser sword as something worth pondering, let alone mentioning.

Now let's test some scientific theories with "Newton's flaming laser sword";
The big bang theory cannot be settled by experimentation, thus it fails the test. However it ties many related theories which can be settled by experimentation together in a neat little bow, which is why it is widely accepted by scientists.


People go to college to pave a career path; it is not like high school where fields are generalized and lumped together. There are no such thing as a "Degree in Art", there is such a thing as a "Degree of Art in [insert field]".

Many people go to university purely because it's the next step up from high school, and don't actually decide what they want to Major in until after they've farted around for a couple of years.
Thus they are either auditing courses or they have a "general studies " major. For those of us who had to pay our own way, wasting the tuition money was not a luxury we adults could afford.

Unless you're really passionate about a given field, it's often the best strategy to take, because you don't waste time studying stuff you're not interested in or not good at, and you've usually got a better idea of what you want to do with your life after tertiary study than before.

All irrelevant. If you selected a major, you have a path in mind, regardless of whether or not you are following through.
You're quibbling over the definition of "Art". "The Arts" includes all the creative subjects, while "Art" usually means drawing stuff.

No; that is not what "art" means. For example; Architecture can fall under the category of an Art. The difference between Art degrees and science or philosophy degrees is that art deals with intuition and skill whereas science deals in facts and philosophy deals with logic.

I think we're mostly splitting hairs in this argument. To bring us back on topic, I'm going to restate your original point as I see it:

If you want to develop technical/analytical skills and learn how the world works, take a Science major.

Not what I said. If you want to enter a knowledge based field you would enter a science major. In other words; if you want your career to be knowledge based a BS would be the best path.

If you want to develop creative/communication skills and learn how people work, take an Art major (Psychology and Economics can fit into either this or Science, depending on interpretation).

Again not what I said. If you want to learn how to utilize intuition and draw upon learned skills, you want an art major. In other words; if you want your career to be skill based a BA would be the best path.

If you want to develop communication skills but not learn jack sh*t about anything important, take Philosophy.

That's my take. Over to you.

Wow you were way off base with this one; even more so than the other two. I said if you want to learn how to utilize knowledge through logic and reason than you would want a philosophy major. In other words; if you want your career to be based on critical thinking a BPh would be the best choice for you.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
Jack212
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2/12/2014 5:42:32 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/11/2014 9:32:01 PM, DanT wrote:

According to their website it is either a Bachelor of science in economics, a Bachelor of Arts in economics, or a Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics and Economics.
http://www.uvic.ca...

Wrong Victoria. Sorry, forgot there'd be more than one.

http://www.victoria.ac.nz...

Apology accepted, but given that I clarified the terms early on in the thread your semantic dispute should have never arisen.

I'm a douche. Sue me.

Now let's test some scientific theories with "Newton's flaming laser sword";
The big bang theory cannot be settled by experimentation, thus it fails the test. However it ties many related theories which can be settled by experimentation together in a neat little bow, which is why it is widely accepted by scientists.

The Big Bang theory makes one simple prediction - that the universe is expanding, and was therefore compressed to a single point at some time in the past. We can observe the physical universe and deduce that it is, in fact, expanding. It may not be conducted in a laboratory, but it is still a valid experiment for the purposes of Newton's Flaming Laser Sword (which I'm abbreviating to NFLS from now on).

Thus they are either auditing courses or they have a "general studies " major. For those of us who had to pay our own way, wasting the tuition money was not a luxury we adults could afford.

This is an ad hominem and thus irrelevant.

You're quibbling over the definition of "Art". "The Arts" includes all the creative subjects, while "Art" usually means drawing stuff.

No; that is not what "art" means. For example; Architecture can fall under the category of an Art. The difference between Art degrees and science or philosophy degrees is that art deals with intuition and skill whereas science deals in facts and philosophy deals with logic.

"The Arts", "an Art", same thing. You know what I'm talking about.


I think we're mostly splitting hairs in this argument. To bring us back on topic, I'm going to restate your original point as I see it:

If you want to develop technical/analytical skills and learn how the world works, take a Science major.

Not what I said. If you want to enter a knowledge based field you would enter a science major. In other words; if you want your career to be knowledge based a BS would be the best path.

If you want to develop creative/communication skills and learn how people work, take an Art major (Psychology and Economics can fit into either this or Science, depending on interpretation).

Again not what I said. If you want to learn how to utilize intuition and draw upon learned skills, you want an art major. In other words; if you want your career to be skill based a BA would be the best path.

If you want to develop communication skills but not learn jack sh*t about anything important, take Philosophy.

That's my take. Over to you.

Wow you were way off base with this one; even more so than the other two. I said if you want to learn how to utilize knowledge through logic and reason than you would want a philosophy major. In other words; if you want your career to be based on critical thinking a BPh would be the best choice for you.

Sorry, when I said "restate your original point as I see it", I meant that I was rephrasing it to reflect the way I see the issue. I was not saying that that is what you said. I apologise for the miscommunication.
DanT
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2/13/2014 3:59:47 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/12/2014 5:42:32 PM, Jack212 wrote:
At 2/11/2014 9:32:01 PM, DanT wrote:

According to their website it is either a Bachelor of science in economics, a Bachelor of Arts in economics, or a Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics and Economics.
http://www.uvic.ca...

Wrong Victoria. Sorry, forgot there'd be more than one.

http://www.victoria.ac.nz...


From their own website "Successful economic analysis is both an art, acquired gradually through practice, and a science, demanding quantitative skills."

This is the entire point I was making!
http://www.victoria.ac.nz...

Furthermore Victoria primarily considers it a commerce major, which is why " It can be earned as a conjoint BCom/Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree".

Now let's test some scientific theories with "Newton's flaming laser sword";
The big bang theory cannot be settled by experimentation, thus it fails the test. However it ties many related theories which can be settled by experimentation together in a neat little bow, which is why it is widely accepted by scientists.

The Big Bang theory makes one simple prediction - that the universe is expanding, and was therefore compressed to a single point at some time in the past. We can observe the physical universe and deduce that it is, in fact, expanding. It may not be conducted in a laboratory, but it is still a valid experiment for the purposes of Newton's Flaming Laser Sword (which I'm abbreviating to NFLS from now on).

OK, how about String Theory vs Loop Quantum Gravity.

Thus they are either auditing courses or they have a "general studies " major. For those of us who had to pay our own way, wasting the tuition money was not a luxury we adults could afford.

This is an ad hominem and thus irrelevant.

I agree; the fact some students fiddle around the 1st year is irrelevant to the purpose and structure of college majors.

You're quibbling over the definition of "Art". "The Arts" includes all the creative subjects, while "Art" usually means drawing stuff.

No; that is not what "art" means. For example; Architecture can fall under the category of an Art. The difference between Art degrees and science or philosophy degrees is that art deals with intuition and skill whereas science deals in facts and philosophy deals with logic.

"The Arts", "an Art", same thing. You know what I'm talking about.

My point still stands.

I think we're mostly splitting hairs in this argument. To bring us back on topic, I'm going to restate your original point as I see it:

If you want to develop technical/analytical skills and learn how the world works, take a Science major.

Not what I said. If you want to enter a knowledge based field you would enter a science major. In other words; if you want your career to be knowledge based a BS would be the best path.

If you want to develop creative/communication skills and learn how people work, take an Art major (Psychology and Economics can fit into either this or Science, depending on interpretation).

Again not what I said. If you want to learn how to utilize intuition and draw upon learned skills, you want an art major. In other words; if you want your career to be skill based a BA would be the best path.

If you want to develop communication skills but not learn jack sh*t about anything important, take Philosophy.

That's my take. Over to you.

Wow you were way off base with this one; even more so than the other two. I said if you want to learn how to utilize knowledge through logic and reason than you would want a philosophy major. In other words; if you want your career to be based on critical thinking a BPh would be the best choice for you.

Sorry, when I said "restate your original point as I see it", I meant that I was rephrasing it to reflect the way I see the issue. I was not saying that that is what you said. I apologise for the miscommunication.

If that is what you think I was saying, than you have not been listening to a word I have been telling you throughout this entire thread.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
Jack212
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2/13/2014 5:46:11 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/13/2014 3:59:47 AM, DanT wrote:

From their own website "Successful economic analysis is both an art, acquired gradually through practice, and a science, demanding quantitative skills."

This is the entire point I was making!
http://www.victoria.ac.nz...

Furthermore Victoria primarily considers it a commerce major, which is why " It can be earned as a conjoint BCom/Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree".

Okay, Economics is a science. Happy now?

OK, how about String Theory vs Loop Quantum Gravity.

Both make predictions, but they are not predictions that can currently be tested and none of the other evidence we have favours one explanation over the other. Therefore, NFLS says there is no point debating the matter until we can observationally determine which one is correct. I don't dwell much on theoretical physics for that reason. It's there, it's fun to think about, and it can lead to some good story ideas, but debating the specifics is a pointless waste of time.

I agree; the fact some students fiddle around the 1st year is irrelevant to the purpose and structure of college majors.

Good, moving on.

"The Arts", "an Art", same thing. You know what I'm talking about.

My point still stands.

I've forgotten what your point was, and probably won't get it from reading our past comments due to subjective bias.

Sorry, when I said "restate your original point as I see it", I meant that I was rephrasing it to reflect the way I see the issue. I was not saying that that is what you said. I apologise for the miscommunication.

If that is what you think I was saying, than you have not been listening to a word I have been telling you throughout this entire thread.

No, that's what I think you've been saying. I just f*cking explained that. You made 3 statements in your original point, I restated them to conform with my opinion on the subject, so that you would know what I was trying to convey in this thread. I was not quoting you, and I was not claiming that they your words or sentiments. I was stating MY opinion, and if I have to explain that again then I'm going to stop replying.

To be honest, I'm now inclined to agree with your statement about Science and Art degrees. I was mostly taking issue with the way you'd originally worded it, because it wasn't as clear as your later clarification. We can drop that point from discussion, as it is settled.

I still disagree with you about Philosophy. I do not see it as overly useful, except as a tool for intellectual masturbation. And to further the analogy, why pay tuition fees to jerk off when you have the option of getting laid?