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Public Universities and Religious Holidays?

tommydaly10
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4/6/2015 11:40:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Do public universities handle religious holidays fairly?

When it comes to giving students breaks from religious holidays, many public universities have different policies. Some schools have their winter break for an entire month allowing students plenty of time to return home to their families to celebrate Hanukkah and Christmas, while others have their last day of exams on December 23, the day before Christmas Eve. Having exams on the day before Christmas Eve, will force students to fly home on Christmas Eve or even later depending on available flights and ticket prices. This can obstruct a student's ability to celebrate a religious holiday.

So we want to ask you:

1. What obligation (if any) does the public university have to allow students to celebrate religious holidays without obstruction?

2. What is the most moral and fair way for public universities to handle religious holidays?

3. Do you feel that some public universities show favoritism toward some religions? Is this fair?

4. Should public universities not schedule classes on religious holidays for ALL religions, SOME religions, or NO religions? Why?

5. What else do you have to say on this topic?
RedSox34
Posts: 1
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4/13/2015 11:44:12 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Hello,

I do feel that some schools show favoritism for some religions' holidays and do not give the same accommodation for others. When I was in school, I went to a public school where the majority of my classmates were Christian. I am Jewish, which I believe is an underrepresented religion in the public school system. It was much more difficult for me to celebrate Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur compared to the Christians who celebrated Christmas and Easter, which was ALWAYS during our winter and spring breaks. I just think it's unfair that Christians always seem to have the advantage when it comes to these things. If schools did not take days off for Christmas or Easter, the entire country would go mad, yet we don't get time off for our major holidays.

At 4/6/2015 11:40:32 PM, tommydaly10 wrote:
Do public universities handle religious holidays fairly?

When it comes to giving students breaks from religious holidays, many public universities have different policies. Some schools have their winter break for an entire month allowing students plenty of time to return home to their families to celebrate Hanukkah and Christmas, while others have their last day of exams on December 23, the day before Christmas Eve. Having exams on the day before Christmas Eve, will force students to fly home on Christmas Eve or even later depending on available flights and ticket prices. This can obstruct a student's ability to celebrate a religious holiday.

So we want to ask you:

1. What obligation (if any) does the public university have to allow students to celebrate religious holidays without obstruction?

2. What is the most moral and fair way for public universities to handle religious holidays?

3. Do you feel that some public universities show favoritism toward some religions? Is this fair?

4. Should public universities not schedule classes on religious holidays for ALL religions, SOME religions, or NO religions? Why?

5. What else do you have to say on this topic?