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Gifted Child = Special Treatment???

Mistystar90
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1/5/2016 10:53:22 PM
Posted: 11 months ago
I was in the advanced and gifted schooling program, which accepts students based on teacher recommendations and IQ. (I don't want to boast, but I want to state my sources). As I grew up, I noticed most of my teachers constantly called on me, and seemed to be astonished when I was unsure of something. They expected a lot from me. I was only 8 or so when this started, and it continued until middle school, when the program was dropped. Even then, the teachers treated me and other intellectuals specially.

I felt constantly pressed to know everything, and I felt incredibly guilty when I didn't. When I was still adjusting to this as a young child, I was terrified. In seventh grade, I filed a complaint to my guidance counselor, but I guess it never reached my teachers. The fact that I was (still am) severely introverted and quiet didn't help.

Is this the kind of mindset gifted children should be raised in? And they're still kids, not Einsteins. Some might already feel enough pressure from their peers to preform well. Encouragement and advice is enough on the teachers part. If a gifted student feels pressured by their teachers, the child will be stressed over the issue of satisfying them.

What about their peers? While I can't speak for them, it can be assumed that while many will admire them, few will strive to improve solely because of the gifted students' performance, despite teacher statements. Teachers shouldn't pick favorites. Several students could be envious, and act negatively towards the said student. This could even drive the student to purposely lower his or her grades to feel more "average".

Lastly, being treated like this could lead a gifted child to have a large ego, and potentially show off. This might reflect on him or her poorly socially.

In conclusion, I believe gifted children should be given special attention and knowledge during special classes and one on ones. But please, PLEASE, don't do teachers pets. It does nothing but harm.

What's your opinion on this topic? What do you believe is the proper solution? Comment!
M i S T Y
dylancatlow
Posts: 12,251
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1/6/2016 5:04:38 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
I think you did a good job of outlining the ways in which programs for the gifted can backfire. One approach would be to separate kids based on mental ability so that all the gifted kids would be together and wouldn't have to deal with being called out at all. It would probably be a more effective method of teaching anyway, because the teacher would be able to teach many kids at once rather than, as is usually the case, giving the "smart kid" a worksheet to do while they engage the rest of the class in an entirely different subject. We had a gifted program at my elementary school called TAG, but it was pathetically inadequate. Like, we would just go to the library and play board games, or walk around on the tables because there were no teachers around.
2cents4change
Posts: 4
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1/9/2016 3:28:39 PM
Posted: 11 months ago
My 9yr old daughter is in a gifted program and my 11yr old son is Autistic and in a DD class while Im on the PTO and volunteer in regular classes, all in the same school, so I got a feel for it all around lol My daughter hasn't complained that the teacher calls on her excessively though I have noticed that teachers call on the 'smarter' or at least the more obedience kids in the regular class unless they are making a point to shame a student that couldn't answer a question because they weren't paying attention. It might be a point of thinking it will push the other students to perform/study better like a competition, shaming disobedient or less smarter students, or it makes them feel better that at least some of the students are doing good therefor THEY are doing good and validates that they are good teachers. At my daughters school she get taken out for 2 hrs each week to go to a special class and do advance work there before returning to her regular class. She loves it there and has fun and had better behavior performance there then in her regular class cause she would get bored, easily distracted and talk to the other students or fidget a lot till I instructed the teachers to give her extra work, still at the same level of the other student just extra sheets, that she does to earn extra TV/video game time at home and the disruptive behaviors has lessened. A few times she would get bullied by other students for being in the specials class called 4 eyes even though she doesn't wear glasses ( guess cause the stereotype that smart people wear glasses lol ) and it hurt her at first but she sees it now as them being jealous that she is smart and gets out of class and does cool hands on experience and such. Teacher should be taught to more fairly call on students( japan called on student same as a roll call, alphabetically or by some random pattern based on birthdays and such - either way eventually ALL students have to answer a question by the end of class/week) and not shame a smart student when they don't know an answer, especially in front of the other students which can exhasirbate bullying from others and feeling of shame and self loathing in the student cause they have been taught to value their intelligence as their self esteem. Also the one on one teaching and creative usage of experiments and engaging academics should be extend to ALL students not just the "gifted" students that their higher SAT scores and accomplishments bring praise, notoriety, and now $ bonuses and extra funding to schools. If we treated ALL students how we treated gifted and special needs students - ALL students would be gifted or at least better students. Right now on average the US is 17th out of 34 in math, 24th out of 34 in science, and 17th of of 34 in reading in the WORLD. YET The U.S. ranks fifth in spending per student OUT OF THE 34 SURVEYED AND TESTED COUNTRIES. Only Austria, Luxembourg, Norway, and Switzerland spend more per student. To put this in context: the Slovak Republic, which scores similarly to the U.S. in test scores, spends $53,000 per student while the U.S. spends $115,000 to achieve the same results. If this was a business it would be in the RED and BANKRUPT.
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