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Will an online degree get my resume tossed?!!

AlyceTheElectrician
Posts: 233
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8/8/2016 10:45:24 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
Is there still a stigma concerning online college degrees?

Be honest, do you respect online college degrees?

Do you think a potential employer will laugh at a bachelor E.E.T(Electrical Engineering Technology) degree from an online college, and toss my resume in the trash?

Thanks in advance for replying.
Be who you are, Say what you feel, Because those who mind don"t matter, And those who matter don't mind.

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RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
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8/9/2016 12:08:58 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 8/8/2016 10:45:24 PM, AlyceTheElectrician wrote:
Is there still a stigma concerning online college degrees?
Alyce, I'm a former tertiary educator and employer, though not in the US jurisdiction. I work in ICT where demand for technical skill has generally been higher than supply for the last thirty years, and our industry sees a lot of Elec Eng degrees.

I think in terms of content delivery, online degrees can be very effective, and bricks-and-mortar institutions are using an increasing amount of online content anyway, so the medium itself isn't an issue, in principle at least -- and you'd hope the tech, energy and manufacturing companies most likely to employ Electrical Engineers would be more likely to understand that.

However as an educator, a risk is what I'd call perverse incentives: it's very easy and highly profitable to scale up online degrees by dropping entry prerequisites, reducing the quality of assessment, lowering teaching qualifications in favour of glossy courseware, and reducing the level of educational support that most students require. It's not just new or low-order tertiary education institutions that can do this: any sufficiently cynical or revenue-pressed college can do it, and depending on jurisdiction there's very little stopping them from doing so. So unless and until it's better regulated, they all risk becoming expensive paper-factories for low-quality education outcomes. So that's the degree side.

On the hire side, as an employer in a knowledge industry, the education of candidates matters to me a great deal, but that's not the same as accreditation. By that I mean, a candidate whose resume bespeaks the ability to question, think, self-organise, show initiative, self-learn and work diligently and adaptably to gain control of an ambiguous outcome counts a lot more to me than letters after their name, no matter where acquired. So for example, I'd be more likely to hire someone with an incomplete degree but clear sign of initiative and self-organisation, than a complete degree that just ticks boxes. Most employers I talk to feel the same.

Adapting that to online degrees, I think my assessment would depend on what else your resume showed. For example, a glowing internship or related casual or part-time work alongside an online degree would gain my interest -- and getting to interview is really what a resume and application are all about. In interview I'd still want to test enough knowledge to assure myself that the degree had been a quality one, but that really depends on your own ability to understand and answer questions and communicate effectively.

Do you think a potential employer will laugh at a bachelor E.E.T(Electrical Engineering Technology) degree from an online college, and toss my resume in the trash?
The great thing about engineering is that a smart employer can test a candidate's ability to analyse, diagnose, synthesise and deal with ambiguity in only a couple of questions. My company's 15 years old, Alyce, and I've never had a case in interview where we've read the technical skills of an engineer wrong. (On the other hand, my experience is that MBA graduates are a crap-shoot!)

So, short form: other than grounding you in the principles and methods of a discipline, the most important things a tertiary degree are to build initiative and sharpen how we think. If you've got that, there are ways of showing that in your career, and if it's in your career you can put it on your resume. If it's on your resume, a good employer should be able to see it, while a poor employer should self-select out.

Good luck!
AlyceTheElectrician
Posts: 233
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8/10/2016 12:31:09 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 8/9/2016 12:08:58 AM, RuvDraba wrote:
At 8/8/2016 10:45:24 PM, AlyceTheElectrician wrote:
Is there still a stigma concerning online college degrees?
Alyce, I'm a former tertiary educator and employer, though not in the US jurisdiction. I work in ICT where demand for technical skill has generally been higher than supply for the last thirty years, and our industry sees a lot of Elec Eng degrees.

I think in terms of content delivery, online degrees can be very effective, and bricks-and-mortar institutions are using an increasing amount of online content anyway, so the medium itself isn't an issue, in principle at least -- and you'd hope the tech, energy and manufacturing companies most likely to employ Electrical Engineers would be more likely to understand that.

However as an educator, a risk is what I'd call perverse incentives: it's very easy and highly profitable to scale up online degrees by dropping entry prerequisites, reducing the quality of assessment, lowering teaching qualifications in favour of glossy courseware, and reducing the level of educational support that most students require. It's not just new or low-order tertiary education institutions that can do this: any sufficiently cynical or revenue-pressed college can do it, and depending on jurisdiction there's very little stopping them from doing so. So unless and until it's better regulated, they all risk becoming expensive paper-factories for low-quality education outcomes. So that's the degree side.

On the hire side, as an employer in a knowledge industry, the education of candidates matters to me a great deal, but that's not the same as accreditation. By that I mean, a candidate whose resume bespeaks the ability to question, think, self-organise, show initiative, self-learn and work diligently and adaptably to gain control of an ambiguous outcome counts a lot more to me than letters after their name, no matter where acquired. So for example, I'd be more likely to hire someone with an incomplete degree but clear sign of initiative and self-organisation, than a complete degree that just ticks boxes. Most employers I talk to feel the same.

Adapting that to online degrees, I think my assessment would depend on what else your resume showed. For example, a glowing internship or related casual or part-time work alongside an online degree would gain my interest -- and getting to interview is really what a resume and application are all about. In interview I'd still want to test enough knowledge to assure myself that the degree had been a quality one, but that really depends on your own ability to understand and answer questions and communicate effectively.

Do you think a potential employer will laugh at a bachelor E.E.T(Electrical Engineering Technology) degree from an online college, and toss my resume in the trash?
The great thing about engineering is that a smart employer can test a candidate's ability to analyse, diagnose, synthesise and deal with ambiguity in only a couple of questions. My company's 15 years old, Alyce, and I've never had a case in interview where we've read the technical skills of an engineer wrong. (On the other hand, my experience is that MBA graduates are a crap-shoot!)

So, short form: other than grounding you in the principles and methods of a discipline, the most important things a tertiary degree are to build initiative and sharpen how we think. If you've got that, there are ways of showing that in your career, and if it's in your career you can put it on your resume. If it's on your resume, a good employer should be able to see it, while a poor employer should self-select out.

Good luck!

Than you!

Yeah I'm trying to decide, I really want to do the five year master's program in electrical engineering with physics at Old dominion university, but that's a lot of time to take away from working experience, vice a quick bachelor degree in electrical engineering technology from Thomas Edison while continuing my current work with hopes of eventually becoming more affluent.

Aye, I'll figure it out, lol
Be who you are, Say what you feel, Because those who mind don"t matter, And those who matter don't mind.

BANGTAN! Blood, Sweat, & Tears> Check it out yes! https://www.youtube.com...
Kyleconn
Posts: 15
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10/13/2016 8:14:21 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
It shouldn't matter. But If there are two options where one is a college degree and the other online, the first preference will be given to the prior.
MeganDavis
Posts: 1
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10/13/2016 2:07:52 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
An online degree is fine. But of course, it depends on the place where you submit your resume. Some companies refer to this loyal, but there are also those for whom it is like a red rag to a bull. In most cases, your resume with an online degree will stand out among the rest. But it is also important that your resume was well written and interesting, it was unique. If you feel that you can not achieve this by yourself, I would recommend you to use http://www.evoessay.com... service. They are offering custom resume writing services, and always doing their job perfectly.