Total Posts:4|Showing Posts:1-4
Jump to topic:

Was the hacking method in Wargames valid?

themohawkninja
Posts: 816
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/15/2013 12:58:05 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I recently watched the movie Wargames, and I couldn't help but wonder whether or not the method that the main character used to hack into computers was valid.

As I understand it, the dial-up system used phone lines (I'm only 18, so I never really understood how the old dial-up system worked while I was growing up) to "call" the website. This worked because back then, computers used analog signals which were sine waves, and analog sound waves were also sine waves. So, as long as you have a way to convert audio input (the output from the phone) to electronic analog signals for the computer (and visa versa), you should be able to ping the source of the phone call to get the basic information of the site and therefore be able to access it from the computer.

The only thing that I don't understand is how calling a phone that a human would pick up and talk through gave you access to a computer. Is this where the hacking method falls into pseudo-science or is the idea still a valid way to hack a computer?
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/15/2013 12:59:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/15/2013 12:58:05 PM, themohawkninja wrote:
I recently watched the movie Wargames, and I couldn't help but wonder whether or not the method that the main character used to hack into computers was valid.

As I understand it, the dial-up system used phone lines (I'm only 18, so I never really understood how the old dial-up system worked while I was growing up) to "call" the website. This worked because back then, computers used analog signals which were sine waves, and analog sound waves were also sine waves. So, as long as you have a way to convert audio input (the output from the phone) to electronic analog signals for the computer (and visa versa), you should be able to ping the source of the phone call to get the basic information of the site and therefore be able to access it from the computer.

The only thing that I don't understand is how calling a phone that a human would pick up and talk through gave you access to a computer. Is this where the hacking method falls into pseudo-science or is the idea still a valid way to hack a computer?

watch the movie summer wars
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
themohawkninja
Posts: 816
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/15/2013 1:14:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/15/2013 12:59:09 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 12/15/2013 12:58:05 PM, themohawkninja wrote:
I recently watched the movie Wargames, and I couldn't help but wonder whether or not the method that the main character used to hack into computers was valid.

As I understand it, the dial-up system used phone lines (I'm only 18, so I never really understood how the old dial-up system worked while I was growing up) to "call" the website. This worked because back then, computers used analog signals which were sine waves, and analog sound waves were also sine waves. So, as long as you have a way to convert audio input (the output from the phone) to electronic analog signals for the computer (and visa versa), you should be able to ping the source of the phone call to get the basic information of the site and therefore be able to access it from the computer.

The only thing that I don't understand is how calling a phone that a human would pick up and talk through gave you access to a computer. Is this where the hacking method falls into pseudo-science or is the idea still a valid way to hack a computer?

watch the movie summer wars

I just looked it up on Netflix. Would the movie you are referring to be an anime about a math genius that ends up in a journey that could destroy both the virtual and real world?
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/15/2013 1:16:15 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/15/2013 1:14:13 PM, themohawkninja wrote:
At 12/15/2013 12:59:09 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 12/15/2013 12:58:05 PM, themohawkninja wrote:
I recently watched the movie Wargames, and I couldn't help but wonder whether or not the method that the main character used to hack into computers was valid.

As I understand it, the dial-up system used phone lines (I'm only 18, so I never really understood how the old dial-up system worked while I was growing up) to "call" the website. This worked because back then, computers used analog signals which were sine waves, and analog sound waves were also sine waves. So, as long as you have a way to convert audio input (the output from the phone) to electronic analog signals for the computer (and visa versa), you should be able to ping the source of the phone call to get the basic information of the site and therefore be able to access it from the computer.

The only thing that I don't understand is how calling a phone that a human would pick up and talk through gave you access to a computer. Is this where the hacking method falls into pseudo-science or is the idea still a valid way to hack a computer?

watch the movie summer wars

I just looked it up on Netflix. Would the movie you are referring to be an anime about a math genius that ends up in a journey that could destroy both the virtual and real world?

its basically the same concept he gets a message and its the security code for the virtual reality world oz where basically tons of goverments and businesses work. he solves and whoever the hacker is launches missiles at nuclear reactors all over world
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.