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Why did only some movies

Adam2
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2/14/2014 9:18:45 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
in the late 1980s and early 90s have something called Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording (late Dolby Stereo SR Digital [the predecessor to what is now Dolby Digital])? Most movies had Dolby Stereo. Now presumibly Dolby Stereo SR was basically to reduce hissing on audio tracks, though regular Spectral Recording would still be analog like regular Dolby Stereo.

But why only some? You'd figure that if they were improving sound all movies would have it. What's the special occassion for them to have SR track? lol Really, now.
Adam2
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2/14/2014 9:21:28 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
That's what I'm talking about
Now I'm not sure, but I believe "Seinfeld" seasons 4 to early episodes of season 6 had a spectral recording. As they say, unless you have THX, you can't 100% remaster everything from an old time. "Seinfeld" is nicely remastered, but certain things give it out when it came out. The sounds in seasons 1 to mid season 6 are farily analogish. In early seasons it would have been just Dolby Stereo until the third episode of season 6 when the hissing starts to diminish.

By "The Race" or "Switch" it starts to be completely digital sound without hiss.
Adam2
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2/14/2014 9:23:15 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
vs

Both season 6, but notice the difference, the sound is much more crisp in the second video I showed, which is from the later half of that season. The first video is from the season premiere, called "The Chaperone."
Adam2
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2/14/2014 9:24:14 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Pardon me, lol, it would have been just Dolby Stereo until the 3rd episode of season 4, which is when the hissing starts to go away.
Adam2
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2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.

Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.
bladerunner060
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2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.
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Adam2
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2/15/2014 12:54:48 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

Cost can't be the only reason. It may be part, but there has to be more to it than just that. I mean Steven Seagal's movies in the late 80s and early 90s were big budget and yet they only used regular Dolby Stereo.
Adam2
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2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.
bladerunner060
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2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.
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Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:48:09 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

OK, but don't you think that if Dolby Stereo SR was an improvement on sound there would be reason to use it more in films (and TV for that matter)? I do know this seasons 4 and later of Seinfeld were definitely an improvement on sound! LMAO. The hissing starts to go away in those seasons, and eventually, the audio becomes digital ha!
Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:49:07 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

I say this because, unless you have THX, obviously you can never remaster an old thing 100%. It will always be 85 - sometimes 90% remastered. Those 10% thingies give it out.
Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:50:15 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

But you have a point it was expensive. Maybe a few years had to pass before more movies would start using it. Yeah you have a point. Which is why 1993 and 1994 was a great year of Spectral Recording movies. Eventually that would lead the way to the mainstreamization of Dolby Digital.
Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:52:42 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

The reason it became mainstream then was because it was more affordable by that point. Yeah, you know what haha. You give me insight.
Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:54:54 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce sound as articles state? Or did it have more to do with adding surround effect (as the way "Spectral Recording" is drawn. At first I got that impression, because it's drawn in a way saying, "You'll get dynamic surround sound."
Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?
bladerunner060
Posts: 7,126
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2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.
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Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.
Adam2
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2/15/2014 1:29:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

I can't imagine how it must have felt seeing a Dolby SR release when it came out. It must have blown your mind. Unless it really was just Dolby without hissing, it would not have made any difference.
bladerunner060
Posts: 7,126
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2/15/2014 3:43:52 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

"In the motion picture industry, as far as it concerns distribution prints of movies, the Dolby A and SR markings refer to Dolby Surround which is not just a method of noise reduction, but more importantly encodes two additional audio channels on the standard optical soundtrack, giving left, center, right, and surround."
Assistant moderator to airmax1227. PM me with any questions or concerns!
Adam2
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2/15/2014 4:30:20 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 3:43:52 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

"In the motion picture industry, as far as it concerns distribution prints of movies, the Dolby A and SR markings refer to Dolby Surround which is not just a method of noise reduction, but more importantly encodes two additional audio channels on the standard optical soundtrack, giving left, center, right, and surround."

Damn Wikipedia, lol
But it all makes sense. No wonder the SR logo is drawn that way.
Adam2
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2/15/2014 4:31:50 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 3:43:52 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

"In the motion picture industry, as far as it concerns distribution prints of movies, the Dolby A and SR markings refer to Dolby Surround which is not just a method of noise reduction, but more importantly encodes two additional audio channels on the standard optical soundtrack, giving left, center, right, and surround."

But here's a question? If a Seinfeld episode were to be free of hissing, even if it were analog, but it didn't have any need for surround sound, would that have been a spectral recording that could qualify for the Dolby Stereo SR certificate (Digital if digital)
Adam2
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2/15/2014 4:32:19 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 3:43:52 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

"In the motion picture industry, as far as it concerns distribution prints of movies, the Dolby A and SR markings refer to Dolby Surround which is not just a method of noise reduction, but more importantly encodes two additional audio channels on the standard optical soundtrack, giving left, center, right, and surround."

Or would it be just Dolby Stereo anyhow?
bladerunner060
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2/15/2014 5:52:51 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 4:31:50 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 3:43:52 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

"In the motion picture industry, as far as it concerns distribution prints of movies, the Dolby A and SR markings refer to Dolby Surround which is not just a method of noise reduction, but more importantly encodes two additional audio channels on the standard optical soundtrack, giving left, center, right, and surround."

But here's a question? If a Seinfeld episode were to be free of hissing, even if it were analog, but it didn't have any need for surround sound, would that have been a spectral recording that could qualify for the Dolby Stereo SR certificate (Digital if digital)

Yes. Channels can be combined--that they're supported in theory doesn't mean they're necessary.And remember the backwards compatibility.
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Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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2/15/2014 6:12:29 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/15/2014 5:52:51 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 4:31:50 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 3:43:52 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:28:19 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:14:11 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:55:41 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 1:22:43 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:55:37 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 2/15/2014 12:43:21 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 2/14/2014 9:28:15 PM, Adam2 wrote:
By the time 1995 came around, Spectral Recording finally became Dolby Digital. In later 1995, movies that would have been first advertised as going to have Dolby Stereo Spectral Recording Digital would end up having Dolby Digital sound (with the Dolby Digital logo). Though some still used the Dolby Stereo SR Digital certificate, like "Dangerous Minds" with Michelle Pfeifer, most started using the Dolby Digital logo. Now movies had pure digital sound, though not as pure as the 21st century. Improvements were still yet to be made.


Anyways, funademental question, why did only some movies had Spectral Recording, while the majority had Dolby Stereo regular.

Likely: Cost.

With indie movies it definitely would have been the case, but there were big budget mainstream movies in that time that didn't use Spectral Recording either. "Pretty Woman," "Godfather III," and many others.

So?

As I understand it, it was considerably more expensive. If it cost more, that is still a reason not to do it.

*Now the older question I had? Spectral Recording -- was it mainly to reduce hissing noise as articles state?

Spectral Recording was noise reduction, yes. But in terms of theatrical release, Dolby A and Dolby SR were Dolby Surround systems.

It must have been ahead of its time (assuming you're older than me and have seen releases when it came out). So you're saying it both? Strangely enough, Dolby SR is not defined as surround, just as sound free or at least relatively free of hissing.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

"In the motion picture industry, as far as it concerns distribution prints of movies, the Dolby A and SR markings refer to Dolby Surround which is not just a method of noise reduction, but more importantly encodes two additional audio channels on the standard optical soundtrack, giving left, center, right, and surround."

But here's a question? If a Seinfeld episode were to be free of hissing, even if it were analog, but it didn't have any need for surround sound, would that have been a spectral recording that could qualify for the Dolby Stereo SR certificate (Digital if digital)

Yes. Channels can be combined--that they're supported in theory doesn't mean they're necessary.And remember the backwards compatibility.

OK, I was just making sure because you added a little bit of the surround sound to the mix there for a second, though SR really is just noise reduction. Reason I say is that yes, Seinfeld (and I say this because even if you remaster an old program or movie excellently, unless you use THX, it will never be near 100%. It will be 90% yes, but not almost 100%). From watching "Seinfeld" in the fourth seasons and later (obviously the later seasons of "Seinfeld" came at the time Dolby Digital [in logo as well] became the standard sound, though not perfect like it would be in the 21st century), "Seinfeld," though a bit analogish sounding, still displayed SR sound.

I guess it was a hit and important show too, hence the need for a memorable SR sound certificate. By the beginning of 1995 (mid season 6), the episodes started to become more digital, almost by our sound standards today (though mid-90s digital sound still needed some improvement to be more like our sound today). Good conversation