Total Posts:6|Showing Posts:1-6
Jump to topic:

Stewart Lee

autocorrect
Posts: 432
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/10/2016 3:39:59 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
So, I just watched Stewart Lee's latest offering on I-player. Don't know when it was on actual television - his offering, but I found myself with a half hour to kill, and I found it browsing on I-player. I was just browsing - funny word that isn't it.... browsing. It sounds like I was frowning while looking through I-player. I wasn't frowning, at least not until I saw Stewart Lee's latest offering, available to watch now - and I frowned. I thought, I remember him. Stewart Lee. So curious, I clicked on it - like you do. There wasn't a click as such, because what I actually did was a double tap on the mouse pad. Little tip there - little double tap and there he was. Stewart Lee. I think it unbecoming really, to comment on someone's appearance - particularly when it has nothing to do with their performance. So I'm not saying anything. There he was. Stewart Lee - much as I remember him; only more so. Quite a bit more so. I couldn't help thinking about Eddy Izzard at this point - out running his third marathon of the day no doubt - and that I felt sure Stewart Lee knew that full well marathon had changed their name to snickers. Had a little laugh at that... which came in handy later on!
The subject, apparently, was to be wealth - and I braced myself for some amusing insights on the topic of wealth, inequality, taxation and re-distributive justice from a, a, a ... comic... famed... for his political views... and it all started out pretty much as expected with talk of the general election ...and then he veered off into a discussion of his own socio-economic class and celebrity status relative to that of Lee Mack and Graham Norton.
It was amusing... I didn't actually laugh; except at the snickers joke, but I was amused. It wasn't about wealth, in much the same way it wasn't funny. It was clever. No doubt Stewart Lee is a clever man. And amusing. I was amused by his offering. I may watch the next one in the series, if I happen upon while having a frown at I-player ...if I have a half hour to kill. And two years to craft an amusing comment upon it!
autocorrect
Posts: 432
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/11/2016 12:16:06 AM
Posted: 9 months ago
Well that was funny in much the same way getting told off by a supply teacher was funny - all those years ago, when I was a schoolboy, and the word Islamaphobia hadn't been invented. Back then it was the IRA bombing us across a divide marked by religious identity. A lot of people won't remember, but it went on for years and years - and people were dying left and right, buildings blown up - or down, depending on your philosophical outlook and the amount of semtex used. We complained and made jokes in equal measure - and cried sometimes at the sheer tragedy of it, but nothing was done until the IRA killed some horses. And it occurred to me that Islamic State are missing a trick! Because that's who we are - whether we like it or not; it's infectious - the Guardian reading, animal loving, not quite vegetarian intelligensia - are the very supply teachers we laughed at in school, who now work at the Guardian and the BBC, and commission television programs by Stewart Lee - to ram home the message they've been ramming down our throats all our lives: how you feel is wrong! Except that bit about the Quakers - that was spot on!
autocorrect
Posts: 432
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/21/2016 2:22:06 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
The image of Jeremy Corbyn squatting over a union jack, squirting diarrhea - while Stewart Lee salutes and sings the national anthem was always there. The genius of Lee is not invention, but to reveal to us these universal truths - these Platonic Ideals with a metaphysical existence as a consequence of the collective consciousness of the nation.

It wasn't always so of course. In 'Imagined Communities' Anderson details the deliberate invention of a national identity through pomp and circumstance, Royal tours and patronage, art, architecture, symbolism and music that would forge a sense of commonality between a Cornish fisherman for example, and a Yorkshire sheep farmer.

The Union Flag of 1707 is a part of all this, deliberate manipulation of people's sense of identity. We should congratulate Lee, who has clearly seen through the insidious plot of juxtaposing the cross of St Andrew with the cross of St Patrick, over the cross of St George. The English, the Scots and the Irish have no business building bridges with symbolism - to create a common identity and collective consciousness that contains, as a Platonic Ideal, the image of Jeremy Corbyn shitting on the flag while Stewart Lee sings the national anthem.

That joke shouldn't have worked!
autocorrect
Posts: 432
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/25/2016 12:21:21 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
So what has he given us so far? Stewart Lee. I say given. He hasn't given us anything, has he? He's a paid performer. Paid from the BBC license fee - actual money to perform his so called comedy. So perhaps the real question is, what has he managed to palm off on the BBC so far - on the wildly optimistic supposition that it would be worth actual money? Have 'en-ter-tain-ment value'. Let us review. He did wealth - his own, mainly. Then he did Islamaphobia - which was ironic, because it was like being crucified. Patriotism last week, or lack thereof. And now death! Which again, is ironic, because not even Camus would have thought it was funny!
(That's not a joke, that. It has the structure of a joke, but it isn't one. Absurdism is not the least bit funny. It's an attempted defence against nihilism. Camus was seriously depressed.)
Stewart Lee in the meantime, is raking in the money - propelled, as he told us in the first episode, into a social strata in which he doesn't belong and isn't welcome. He isn't depressed, palming his offerings on the BBC for actual money. Four half hours. Two hours from my one life. An hour or more commenting online - on each half hour! What am I doing here? Is this what it has come to? Is there nothing more to my existence than this? I can't take anymore. I must end it!
Goodbye.
autocorrect
Posts: 432
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/1/2016 1:27:42 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
Another week, another.... Yes. I'm still alive. Another week, anothe.... I wasn't really going to end it. That was an homage...an homage. A homage. I think it's an, an homage. Anyhow. Another week, another..... An homage to the motif, or theme introduced by Stewart Lee. The theme was death...so naturally, my conclusion was that watching his show depresses me to the point of suicide. As I was saying. Another week, another.... Well. no. I like Stewart Lee - despite everything I've said. I mean, I don't like him personally. I don't know him. I imagine he's an insufferable know it all. I don't like his views, the way he dresses or looks, or his disdain for the audience... possibly feigned, maybe it's real. I don't know. But he has got a nice voice. I'll give him that. He could do voice-overs for over 50's insurance policies. Anyways, as I was saying, another week, another... Funny is quite a subjective thing. Stewart Lee is funny in the way Picasso was sh!t at painting. It didn't stop him producing some interesting works of art. Well no, I don't know enough about art to say Picasso was sh!t at painting - but still, I think it works as a metaphor. Well, it's not a similie is it? An analogy maybe - hardly an allegory. I'm going with metaphor - and if it's not correct, my use of the word metaphor was a metaphor for analogy. So, as I was saying before I interrupted myself again, another week, anoth... Brown corduroy again. Another week, another brown. Brown...Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown, Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown, Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown, Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown. Brown...
autocorrect
Posts: 432
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/7/2016 10:38:59 PM
Posted: 8 months ago
Last in the series. Six of six. Subject, nominally - childhood, but not actually about childhood at all. Difficult to follow. Not that it was difficult to understand - as such, although it was quite a complex piece hung on the nail of a story from his childhood. But rather, now - I have to comment on it, and it was funny, and I did laugh, but it was also meaningful in some way that's difficult to pin down - such that it leaves you disquieted in a way the levity doesn't entirely compensate for. And that's why, as the years have gone by, Stewart Lee still hasn't played the Apollo!
To be fair, he's not that kind of comedian - but yet I'm reluctant to concede the claim he's 'this.' This is this - he claimed, absurdly. As if his comedy act were entirely self contained and satisfactory unto itself, it's own measure of its own quantity and quality. Ha ha ha! Despite his feigned disdain for the audience as evidenced by five minuets of munching sounds to close out last weeks episode, of course, it's not that this is this but that that is a comedy act - performed to an audience whose laughter and lingering sense of disquiet are the measure of its success.
Were it otherwise, this - as a measure of this, why the audience, why the cameras, lights and microphone, not belied by the deliberately off-beat venue and the same rumpled brown corduroy shirt, not belied by the insults and anger thrown at the audience - the fact that it is after-all a show, and he a performer paid by the BBC to perform. Were it otherwise, he might as well be me - as a measure of me; writing nothing no-one ever read. Ha ha ha!