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prologues and trailers

film
Posts: 85
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3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..
autocorrect
Posts: 432
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3/25/2016 5:24:47 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM, film wrote:
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..

I would say, don't advertise at all - but instead, go all out to keep films secret - so that you go to the cinema, and watch whatever is on. In this way, by being exposed to what they might not normally choose to see, people would widen their tastes in cinema, and every movie wouldn't have to come from the Hollywood cookie cutter.
Selcouth_Debater
Posts: 70
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3/25/2016 6:11:11 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/25/2016 5:24:47 AM, autocorrect wrote:
At 3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM, film wrote:
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..

I would say, don't advertise at all - but instead, go all out to keep films secret - so that you go to the cinema, and watch whatever is on. In this way, by being exposed to what they might not normally choose to see, people would widen their tastes in cinema, and every movie wouldn't have to come from the Hollywood cookie cutter.

I partially agree with you. Although I think you should at least advertise a bit to make your film known, I think that keeping films secret is extremely effective in regards to intriguing audiences more. Take 10 Cloverfield Lane, for example - that film had only two official trailers, and because they don't tell much about the plot of the movie, people were instantly intrigued and excited to watch it.
"The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence." ~ Charles Bukowski

Formerly known as kawaii_crazy. I'm back.
autocorrect
Posts: 432
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3/25/2016 6:30:09 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/25/2016 6:11:11 AM, Selcouth_Debater wrote:
At 3/25/2016 5:24:47 AM, autocorrect wrote:
At 3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM, film wrote:
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..

I would say, don't advertise at all - but instead, go all out to keep films secret - so that you go to the cinema, and watch whatever is on. In this way, by being exposed to what they might not normally choose to see, people would widen their tastes in cinema, and every movie wouldn't have to come from the Hollywood cookie cutter.

I partially agree with you. Although I think you should at least advertise a bit to make your film known, I think that keeping films secret is extremely effective in regards to intriguing audiences more. Take 10 Cloverfield Lane, for example - that film had only two official trailers, and because they don't tell much about the plot of the movie, people were instantly intrigued and excited to watch it.

I haven't seen Cloverfield Lane yet. Please don't tell me more. I was half joking about not advertising at all - and hope that's the part you agree with. In all honesty, I like a good cookie cutter, guns and stunts movie - but I also like the old movies - with real stories. Citizen Kane, the Third Man, 39 Steps, Gone with the Wind, It's a wonderful life. They were great films - no stunts, car chases, gun-play or explosions to speak of, and yet still they captured the audience, and more so I think than 92 mins of stunts, car chases and shooting people for fun.
Selcouth_Debater
Posts: 70
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3/25/2016 6:39:57 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/25/2016 6:30:09 AM, autocorrect wrote:
At 3/25/2016 6:11:11 AM, Selcouth_Debater wrote:
At 3/25/2016 5:24:47 AM, autocorrect wrote:
At 3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM, film wrote:
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..

I would say, don't advertise at all - but instead, go all out to keep films secret - so that you go to the cinema, and watch whatever is on. In this way, by being exposed to what they might not normally choose to see, people would widen their tastes in cinema, and every movie wouldn't have to come from the Hollywood cookie cutter.

I partially agree with you. Although I think you should at least advertise a bit to make your film known, I think that keeping films secret is extremely effective in regards to intriguing audiences more. Take 10 Cloverfield Lane, for example - that film had only two official trailers, and because they don't tell much about the plot of the movie, people were instantly intrigued and excited to watch it.

I haven't seen Cloverfield Lane yet. Please don't tell me more. I was half joking about not advertising at all - and hope that's the part you agree with. In all honesty, I like a good cookie cutter, guns and stunts movie - but I also like the old movies - with real stories. Citizen Kane, the Third Man, 39 Steps, Gone with the Wind, It's a wonderful life. They were great films - no stunts, car chases, gun-play or explosions to speak of, and yet still they captured the audience, and more so I think than 92 mins of stunts, car chases and shooting people for fun.

Well, I haven't watched it either. Not yet, that is, but I can't wait to see it. And I agree - some of the greatest films seem to be, but aren't in reality, the most anti-climactic. An emotional movie with a good plot and actors/actresses makes for a much better experience than a 90-minute movie packed with fake CGI, crude jokes, and unnecessary violence.
"The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence." ~ Charles Bukowski

Formerly known as kawaii_crazy. I'm back.
autocorrect
Posts: 432
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3/25/2016 6:50:00 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/25/2016 6:39:57 AM, Selcouth_Debater wrote:
At 3/25/2016 6:30:09 AM, autocorrect wrote:
At 3/25/2016 6:11:11 AM, Selcouth_Debater wrote:
At 3/25/2016 5:24:47 AM, autocorrect wrote:
At 3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM, film wrote:
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..

I would say, don't advertise at all - but instead, go all out to keep films secret - so that you go to the cinema, and watch whatever is on. In this way, by being exposed to what they might not normally choose to see, people would widen their tastes in cinema, and every movie wouldn't have to come from the Hollywood cookie cutter.

I partially agree with you. Although I think you should at least advertise a bit to make your film known, I think that keeping films secret is extremely effective in regards to intriguing audiences more. Take 10 Cloverfield Lane, for example - that film had only two official trailers, and because they don't tell much about the plot of the movie, people were instantly intrigued and excited to watch it.

I haven't seen Cloverfield Lane yet. Please don't tell me more. I was half joking about not advertising at all - and hope that's the part you agree with. In all honesty, I like a good cookie cutter, guns and stunts movie - but I also like the old movies - with real stories. Citizen Kane, the Third Man, 39 Steps, Gone with the Wind, It's a wonderful life. They were great films - no stunts, car chases, gun-play or explosions to speak of, and yet still they captured the audience, and more so I think than 92 mins of stunts, car chases and shooting people for fun.

Well, I haven't watched it either. Not yet, that is, but I can't wait to see it. And I agree - some of the greatest films seem to be, but aren't in reality, the most anti-climactic. An emotional movie with a good plot and actors/actresses makes for a much better experience than a 90-minute movie packed with fake CGI, crude jokes, and unnecessary violence.

I agree. You walk out of one of those films with little idea of what you've just seen, only that it was exciting. I can get the same effect from three cups of coffee. But what's this with the prologue? I'm not sure I quite understand. Are you talking about filming a sub-plot or side quest - featuring some of the same characters or locations, to be shown as an advert for the main feature?
thewiseguy1
Posts: 1
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3/25/2016 7:12:05 AM
Posted: 8 months ago
At 3/25/2016 4:58:54 AM, film wrote:
is a film prologue the right way to attract the audience instead of several trailers (and several spoilers) ?

much like the book samples..

I think advertising is a right us consumers need to see before buyin a product. Would you pay for a new product if you havnt heard of it before i doubt buying blind you would.
A similar principle in context.
Widen our viewing options i doubt as we all have our own preferences to taste ie. To view a movie and find it dire then you own variety is shortened to preferences. And lets end by sayin titles alone can give an audience imagination into the movie... .