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Vegetarians, what is your motivation??

F-16_Fighting_Falcon
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11/6/2011 9:42:01 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I saw a thread on a related topic and I wanted to make this thread to ask the vegetarians what drives them. Why are you a vegetarian? Humans are in fact omnivores and we eat both plants and animals to get the nutrients that we require. What is the motivation for you to not eat animals and only live on plants?

Also, I would like to hear from other omnivores, your opinions on why you think vegetarians do what they do. Why do they feel that not eating animals is somehow the "right thing to do" or something similar to that.
Mirza
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11/6/2011 9:56:36 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 11/6/2011 9:42:01 AM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
Also, I would like to hear from other omnivores, your opinions on why you think vegetarians do what they do. Why do they feel that not eating animals is somehow the "right thing to do" or something similar to that.
The common arguments are that animals are sentient and treated harshly prior to slaughter. They ignore the scientific research done which says that plants are sentient too.
Kinesis
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11/6/2011 10:04:00 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The usual answer is that the meat industry causes huge amounts of suffering to animals - intensive chicken farming, for example, can be quite horrific: http://en.wikipedia.org...

The chickens often live for only 6 weeks and in that time they're cooped up in a wire cage unable to move around. Their beaks sometimes have to be removed because they cannibalise each other in the cramped conditions. The ones that are kept longer for eggs develop osteoporosis because they don't get enough calcium to replenish that lost from egg laying.

Off course, not all animal slaughtering is as cruel but I think some people just don't want to risk contributing to an industry that does those kind of things.
Kinesis
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11/6/2011 10:11:36 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The common arguments are that animals are sentient and treated harshly prior to slaughter. They ignore the scientific research done which says that plants are sentient too.

This is a ridiculous equivocation on the word sentient - in the research papers you're referring too (I assume that of František Baluška) sentience is nothing like the sentience of higher-order intelligence animals. The ability of plants to process information is nowhere near fast or complex enough for them to have anything like feelings or emotions.

And besides, the practice of eating meat results in far more plants being eaten than if we just ate them directly because the process of rearing animals via food stuffs is so inefficient.
Mirza
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11/6/2011 10:22:09 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 11/6/2011 10:11:36 AM, Kinesis wrote:
This is a ridiculous equivocation on the word sentient - in the research papers you're referring too (I assume that of František Baluška) sentience is nothing like the sentience of higher-order intelligence animals. The ability of plants to process information is nowhere near fast or complex enough for them to have anything like feelings or emotions.
That's nice. Maybe you can expect a debate challenge on that bunch of... information once I get time.
000ike
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11/6/2011 10:28:11 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Vegetarians think that it is immoral to kill things that feel pain or are significantly conscious and self-aware. When there are bountiful alternatives to killing animals, vegetarians feel that it is the morally righteous action to take the alternatives.

I wonder if a vegetarian would support eating dead people. :p
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
OMGJustinBieber
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11/6/2011 10:37:48 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I agree with Kinesis, any attempt to equivocate the conscious states of plants and cows is pretty ridiculous. I had a debate on this topic, but the issue revolves around the possession of a central nervous system. Mythbusters concluded the idea that plants feel and have emotions is a myth, and if its true it certainly holds bizarre implications - I'll never view mowing my lawn in the same way again.
Kinesis
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11/6/2011 10:40:38 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
That's nice. Maybe you can expect a debate challenge on that bunch of... information once I get time.

While your claim that plants are sentient in the kind of way that would require us to value them in moral considerations is absurd and unsubstantiated, we really don't even need to go into that until you address the second point. Rearing animals is inefficient - the process of rearing animals for slaughter uses far more plant products than would be used if we just ate plant products directly. So, even if plants are sentient (they aren't) it would still be better to eat them.
vbaculum
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11/7/2011 4:21:25 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
For me, it is simply that I am opposed to the torture sentient creatures.

If meat or other animal products could be made with out animals being tortured, I would still eat a plant-based diet. I'm already accustomed to a vegan diet and enjoy it. Animal products contain LDL cholesterol (plants don't). Animal products also contain saturated fats. There are only a couple of plant-based foods that have saturated fats (mainly coconut and palm oil).

According to a UN report released in 2010, a meat and dairy based diet is not sustainable in the long run, and is reponsible for much of the 19% percent of the greenhouse gases emmitted by agribusiness (http://www.guardian.co.uk...). A common question environmentalists ask themselves is "Is it possible to be a meat-eating environmentalist?".
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
darkkermit
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11/7/2011 5:30:10 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 11/7/2011 4:21:25 PM, vbaculum wrote:
For me, it is simply that I am opposed to the torture sentient creatures.

If meat or other animal products could be made with out animals being tortured, I would still eat a plant-based diet. I'm already accustomed to a vegan diet and enjoy it. Animal products contain LDL cholesterol (plants don't). Animal products also contain saturated fats. There are only a couple of plant-based foods that have saturated fats (mainly coconut and palm oil).

According to a UN report released in 2010, a meat and dairy based diet is not sustainable in the long run, and is reponsible for much of the 19% percent of the greenhouse gases emmitted by agribusiness (http://www.guardian.co.uk...). A common question environmentalists ask themselves is "Is it possible to be a meat-eating environmentalist?".

Assuming that green-house gas emissions are a problem, they can easily be remedied by man-made cooling techniques.
Open borders debate:
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Willoweed
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11/18/2011 7:46:54 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
There are two other reasons besides the "animals are sentient" arguments.
1) Animal production causes a lot of greenhouse gasses to be emitted which causes climate change/global warming and are bad for our health.
2) The amount of resources used to raise animals is high. For example if we used all the resources that America uses to raise animals to raise crops we could end world hunger
Oryus
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12/5/2011 2:43:19 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I am a lacto-ovo-pesca vegetarian. In other words, I'm not a strict vegetarian. I eat only animals from the sea, preferably caught in the wild in a sustainable manner. Needless to say, I don't eat animals from the sea very often. It is usually a treat I give myself once a month or so. But I do eat it, nonetheless.

My main reasons are this:
1. My main-main reason: As folks have already said, animals are sentient creatures. For the most part, animals are kept in deplorable conditions while being raised for slaughter. They know only short lives of pain, suffering, and disease. They rarely eat the food they are truly meant to eat. Their deaths are sometimes unspeakably and unnecessarily violent and dragged out. I believe that it is immoral to treat sentient beings in this way so I do not contribute to it by not eating meat.

2. Again, as someone already said, the environmental implications of mass farming are very difficult to ignore. The amount of greenhouse gases put into the air by factory farms is not something that I want or need to contribute to, so I don't. The bio-hazard it presents- the disease it spreads. It's just unnecessary. Food poisoning and food recalls are often caused by cattle's sh!t. So, even though I'm vegetarian, I still have to worry about getting a disease from factory farms because I sometimes eat raw veggies! But at least I don't contribute to it, by not paying for the meat itself.

3. The careless use of antibiotics and hormones is dangerous. The meat industry is FAR too liberal when preemptively force-feeding animals antibiotics and hormones. People are gaining resistance to antibiotics because of eating meat.

4. The employees at slaughterhouses are, quite often, exploited. They are paid tiny wages for one of the most dangerous jobs you can have. Companies often value productivity over safety. In addition to the exploitation of employees, slaughterhouses will often make or break a small town that it enters- not unlike the impact of a Super Wal-Mart. The towns become dependent on the company for work. However, with such high turnover rates, the factories will often run through the towns workforce and move on to hiring immigrants. Then the small town is left with this giant slaughterhouse, a growing immigrant population that it must attend to in various ways politically and economically, and live with the pollution from the slaughterhouse.

There are many things I could add to this. Really, I could write a very long piece on this, but this pretty much sums it up, methinks.
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Oryus
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12/5/2011 2:54:59 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 11/6/2011 10:28:11 AM, 000ike wrote:
Vegetarians think that it is immoral to kill things that feel pain or are significantly conscious and self-aware. When there are bountiful alternatives to killing animals, vegetarians feel that it is the morally righteous action to take the alternatives.

I wonder if a vegetarian would support eating dead people. :p

lol

As long as the living family members found it to be o.k., and it is not against the will of the person who died (unless there are extreme circumstances), because I do tend to respect the dignity of a person even if their body is dead, I don't see anything morally wrong with eating dead people. ;)
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
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royalpaladin
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12/8/2011 12:36:34 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 11/6/2011 10:37:48 AM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
I agree with Kinesis, any attempt to equivocate the conscious states of plants and cows is pretty ridiculous. I had a debate on this topic, but the issue revolves around the possession of a central nervous system. Mythbusters concluded the idea that plants feel and have emotions is a myth, and if its true it certainly holds bizarre implications - I'll never view mowing my lawn in the same way again.

This brings back memories, haha. I was the other debater on that topic. If you are interested in reading it, here is the link. By the way, there are a variety of factors that ethical vegetarians ignore, namely that if we eat plants, we steal food from animals and cause them to die anyways. We also have to destroy animals' habitats to increase the size of farmlands, and thus kill them as well. If ethical vegetarianism is correct, then modern society would cease to exist, since our homes are built in the habitats of animals and killing animals is morally blameworthy.

http://www.debate.org...
tyler90az
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12/9/2011 2:04:47 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I heard a very compelling argument to not be vegetarian before. The argument is that to be vegetarian would be a huge disservice to our ancestors. The fact that way back when they had to fight for meat to survive. It was something along those lines, it was very intriguing to me. However, I must mention I am not vegetarian, but respect those who are.
Today we begin in earnest the work of making sure that the world we leave our children is just a little bit better than the one we inhabit today. - President Obama
Oryus
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12/9/2011 2:23:11 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 12/9/2011 2:04:47 PM, tyler90az wrote:
I heard a very compelling argument to not be vegetarian before. The argument is that to be vegetarian would be a huge disservice to our ancestors. The fact that way back when they had to fight for meat to survive. It was something along those lines, it was very intriguing to me. However, I must mention I am not vegetarian, but respect those who are.

That is very interesting. And I assume you haven't put the argument in the best light here, as it is a short paraphrase, but I certainly don't see "honoring our ancestors" as a negation of "honoring sentient creatures who exist now" or "honoring future generations" (by not polluting and creating super-bugs with the over-use of antibiotics, etc.) I mean... our bodies exists as they do because we began meat-eating. But the whole complex that supports meat-eating in our society is the problem- not the act of eating meat itself. Know what I'm sayin?
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
bluesteel
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12/9/2011 2:25:11 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 12/9/2011 2:04:47 PM, tyler90az wrote:
I heard a very compelling argument to not be vegetarian before. The argument is that to be vegetarian would be a huge disservice to our ancestors. The fact that way back when they had to fight for meat to survive. It was something along those lines, it was very intriguing to me. However, I must mention I am not vegetarian, but respect those who are.

They also fought to rape and pillage (Saxons, Norsemen), to force their religion on others (Crusades, Inquisition), for slavery (Civil War), to commit genocide (Nazis, Rwanda), etc...

The argument from tradition is usually not a strong one.

Vegetarians who argue that eating no meat is more "natural," however, do have their arguments destroyed by historical evidence that we are omnivores.
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
bluesteel
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12/9/2011 2:26:39 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
@Oryus

Would you eat lamb or organic range beef/chicken? Most of your complaints about mass farming (antibiotics, etc) don't apply to these meats, so I'm just curious.
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
Oryus
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12/9/2011 2:39:46 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 12/9/2011 2:26:39 PM, bluesteel wrote:
@Oryus

Would you eat lamb or organic range beef/chicken? Most of your complaints about mass farming (antibiotics, etc) don't apply to these meats, so I'm just curious.

Yes, I would eat that meat.

However, I still don't eat meat now, so it would probably make me sick. I probably wouldn't eat it for that reason.
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
gerrandesquire
Posts: 1,258
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1/18/2012 10:43:57 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/6/2011 9:42:01 AM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
I saw a thread on a related topic and I wanted to make this thread to ask the vegetarians what drives them. Why are you a vegetarian? Humans are in fact omnivores and we eat both plants and animals to get the nutrients that we require. What is the motivation for you to not eat animals and only live on plants?

Personally, it's hereditary. If you grew up listening 'ew... they eat pigeons', you'd never ever want to eat them. But now that I've started eating egg, I know how easy it is to disregard the 'life' in the animals and eat them. But still, for me, there's no motivation. Just repulsion.

Also, I would like to hear from other omnivores, your opinions on why you think vegetarians do what they do. Why do they feel that not eating animals is somehow the "right thing to do" or something similar to that.

About whether it is the 'right' thing to do or not, I'm ambiguous. You ARE what you eat. I strongly believe that what you decide to eat has a strong implication on your personality. So all it boils down to is whether eating dead animals is something that does not repulse your morality. As morality is subjective, there is no RIGHT answer.
vbaculum
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1/18/2012 12:31:55 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/18/2012 10:43:57 AM, gerrandesquire wrote:
At 11/6/2011 9:42:01 AM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
I saw a thread on a related topic and I wanted to make this thread to ask the vegetarians what drives them. Why are you a vegetarian? Humans are in fact omnivores and we eat both plants and animals to get the nutrients that we require. What is the motivation for you to not eat animals and only live on plants?

Personally, it's hereditary. If you grew up listening 'ew... they eat pigeons', you'd never ever want to eat them. But now that I've started eating egg, I know how easy it is to disregard the 'life' in the animals and eat them. But still, for me, there's no motivation. Just repulsion.

So you grew up in a Hindu family who didn't eat eggs or meat for relgious reasons and therefore you find eating meat repulsive?

I'm curious, what do you make of Westerners who say they can't be without meat or who think a life without meat has to be an intolerable privation? This must seem strange to you assuming you were raised in a meatless culture.


Also, I would like to hear from other omnivores, your opinions on why you think vegetarians do what they do. Why do they feel that not eating animals is somehow the "right thing to do" or something similar to that.

About whether it is the 'right' thing to do or not, I'm ambiguous. You ARE what you eat. I strongly believe that what you decide to eat has a strong implication on your personality. So all it boils down to is whether eating dead animals is something that does not repulse your morality. As morality is subjective, there is no RIGHT answer.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
gerrandesquire
Posts: 1,258
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1/19/2012 9:33:31 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/18/2012 12:31:55 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/18/2012 10:43:57 AM, gerrandesquire wrote:
At 11/6/2011 9:42:01 AM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
I saw a thread on a related topic and I wanted to make this thread to ask the vegetarians what drives them. Why are you a vegetarian? Humans are in fact omnivores and we eat both plants and animals to get the nutrients that we require. What is the motivation for you to not eat animals and only live on plants?

Personally, it's hereditary. If you grew up listening 'ew... they eat pigeons', you'd never ever want to eat them. But now that I've started eating egg, I know how easy it is to disregard the 'life' in the animals and eat them. But still, for me, there's no motivation. Just repulsion.

So you grew up in a Hindu family who didn't eat eggs or meat for relgious reasons and therefore you find eating meat repulsive?

Basically yes. My father ate eggs so I tasted and developed a liking for it, but then again I was convinced to eat it along the lines of ' this isn't really meat' and that 'birds wouldn't hatch from these', so that did not repulse my morality.

I'm curious, what do you make of Westerners who say they can't be without meat or who think a life without meat has to be an intolerable privation? This must seem strange to you assuming you were raised in a meatless culture.

Yes, I've always felt that vegetarian options haven't been thoroughly explored in many places. There's more to vegetarians than salads. So basically how I felt was the extreme opposite of what most westerners feel of vegetarian diets. That it was something that wasn't really necessary.

In fact, initially, I had this theory that they didn't really trace the source of what they ate, and somehow numbed their senses in order to eat it.
InsertNameHere
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1/20/2012 11:53:34 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I could personally never be a vegetarian(for a few reasons), but as others have said it's usually in response to factory farming. There are some farms that actually find more humane ways and that I'm fine with(hence free trade, organic, etc.). Eating animals is natural and humans have done it since their existence.
vbaculum
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1/21/2012 1:03:31 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/20/2012 11:53:34 PM, InsertNameHere wrote:
I could personally never be a vegetarian(for a few reasons), but as others have said it's usually in response to factory farming. There are some farms that actually find more humane ways and that I'm fine with(hence free trade, organic, etc.).

Just because a company can raise an animal and kill it with a little less cruelty than another company doesn't make the practice humane; just less cruel. On these farms, the animals still endure tremendous amounts of unnecessary suffering.

Eating animals is natural and humans have done it since their existence.
Saying something is natural or that it has been done for a long time does not justify it. This is the appeal to nature fallacy and the appeal to tradition fallacy respectively.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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1/21/2012 4:00:08 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/7/2011 4:21:25 PM, vbaculum wrote:
For me, it is simply that I am opposed to the torture sentient creatures.

If meat or other animal products could be made with out animals being tortured, I would still eat a plant-based diet. I'm already accustomed to a vegan diet and enjoy it. Animal products contain LDL cholesterol (plants don't). Animal products also contain saturated fats. There are only a couple of plant-based foods that have saturated fats (mainly coconut and palm oil).

According to a UN report released in 2010, a meat and dairy based diet is not sustainable in the long run, and is reponsible for much of the 19% percent of the greenhouse gases emmitted by agribusiness (http://www.guardian.co.uk...). A common question environmentalists ask themselves is "Is it possible to be a meat-eating environmentalist?".

Just interested - are you a vegan or a vegetarian?
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vbaculum
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1/22/2012 9:13:38 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/21/2012 4:00:08 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 11/7/2011 4:21:25 PM, vbaculum wrote:
For me, it is simply that I am opposed to the torture sentient creatures.

If meat or other animal products could be made with out animals being tortured, I would still eat a plant-based diet. I'm already accustomed to a vegan diet and enjoy it. Animal products contain LDL cholesterol (plants don't). Animal products also contain saturated fats. There are only a couple of plant-based foods that have saturated fats (mainly coconut and palm oil).

According to a UN report released in 2010, a meat and dairy based diet is not sustainable in the long run, and is reponsible for much of the 19% percent of the greenhouse gases emmitted by agribusiness (http://www.guardian.co.uk...). A common question environmentalists ask themselves is "Is it possible to be a meat-eating environmentalist?".

Just interested - are you a vegan or a vegetarian?

Vegan. I was actually wondering the same thing about you. Seems like I heard you were veg once but not sure.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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1/22/2012 9:13:16 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/22/2012 9:13:38 AM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/21/2012 4:00:08 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 11/7/2011 4:21:25 PM, vbaculum wrote:
For me, it is simply that I am opposed to the torture sentient creatures.

If meat or other animal products could be made with out animals being tortured, I would still eat a plant-based diet. I'm already accustomed to a vegan diet and enjoy it. Animal products contain LDL cholesterol (plants don't). Animal products also contain saturated fats. There are only a couple of plant-based foods that have saturated fats (mainly coconut and palm oil).

According to a UN report released in 2010, a meat and dairy based diet is not sustainable in the long run, and is reponsible for much of the 19% percent of the greenhouse gases emmitted by agribusiness (http://www.guardian.co.uk...). A common question environmentalists ask themselves is "Is it possible to be a meat-eating environmentalist?".

Just interested - are you a vegan or a vegetarian?

Vegan. I was actually wondering the same thing about you. Seems like I heard you were veg once but not sure.

I am not currently, however, I was and am considering it. I take the arguments for the position very seriously.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
Ren
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1/23/2012 12:55:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The subject of diet is a nebulous one.

You see, I'm a latter-day society kind of guy. I'm the sort of who will walk up to the nice Polish lady on the corner in Washington Square and buy a souvlaki without an animal so much as crossing my mind. It will be delicious and I would think nothing of it.

In fact, when I see meat, I don't think of animals at all, I simply thing in terms of food variation. I'm a gourmand; I take my food very seriously and it is an intimate part of my inner life.

But, then, there's that universal question, that ultimate question, of whether I am naturally-inclined to do this, to eat meat. My honest answer is no; I'd likely be a vegetarian, or someone who limited his meat consumption to fish, if I were to live separate of any sort of establishment. If I were truly responsible for myself or my family, then I very likely would never even think to kill an animal to sustain. I don't look at animals and think of food.

You ever think about that? Like, take fruit -- the way they feel, their coloring, their smell; it's all very palatable. It's sensible to think that someone would just try to eat one for the hell of it to see whether it's edible.

But, like a cow or a deer? Standing next to one of those, I don't get hungry. I never think to take a bite.

In fact, I don't even feel that way around raw meat; I actually find it slightly distasteful. It is only when it is specifically prepared does meat become appetizing.

I might think to eat fish from observing other animals; that much I can't deny. But, the sheer brutality of primal carnism is something I probably couldn't get with.

There's other ways than beating something to death to eat.
Oryus
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1/23/2012 1:35:45 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/23/2012 12:55:30 PM, Ren wrote:
The subject of diet is a nebulous one.

You see, I'm a latter-day society kind of guy. I'm the sort of who will walk up to the nice Polish lady on the corner in Washington Square and buy a souvlaki without an animal so much as crossing my mind. It will be delicious and I would think nothing of it.

In fact, when I see meat, I don't think of animals at all, I simply thing in terms of food variation. I'm a gourmand; I take my food very seriously and it is an intimate part of my inner life.

But, then, there's that universal question, that ultimate question, of whether I am naturally-inclined to do this, to eat meat. My honest answer is no; I'd likely be a vegetarian, or someone who limited his meat consumption to fish, if I were to live separate of any sort of establishment. If I were truly responsible for myself or my family, then I very likely would never even think to kill an animal to sustain. I don't look at animals and think of food.

You ever think about that? Like, take fruit -- the way they feel, their coloring, their smell; it's all very palatable. It's sensible to think that someone would just try to eat one for the hell of it to see whether it's edible.

But, like a cow or a deer? Standing next to one of those, I don't get hungry. I never think to take a bite.

In fact, I don't even feel that way around raw meat; I actually find it slightly distasteful. It is only when it is specifically prepared does meat become appetizing.

I might think to eat fish from observing other animals; that much I can't deny. But, the sheer brutality of primal carnism is something I probably couldn't get with.

There's other ways than beating something to death to eat.

I wonder if the fact that standing next to an animal doesn't make you hungry has much to do with the fact that you are well fed and have no worries over where your next meal will come from? If you were still in the garden of eden with no control over where your food was coming from, only how you retrieve it, wouldn't standing near an animal make you hungrier?

Even myself, as a vegetarian, if I were for some strange reason lost in the wilderness, I certainly wouldn't look at a rabbit and think, "bunny!" I would be looking at it through voracious eyes- and the rabbit most definitely wouldn't want me near it.

As far as what I see in society- I try to look at all the food I eat and discern it's source. Obviously, I can't be too crazy about it. I can't possibly know where every bite I eat comes from. But generally, I consider the source of where most things/food I have come from. And if it's in my power to get something better, I will. If you've read my thoughts on factory farms anywhere on DDO, you'll know what I mean.
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
vbaculum
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1/23/2012 2:13:37 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/22/2012 9:13:16 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 1/22/2012 9:13:38 AM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/21/2012 4:00:08 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 11/7/2011 4:21:25 PM, vbaculum wrote:
For me, it is simply that I am opposed to the torture sentient creatures.

If meat or other animal products could be made with out animals being tortured, I would still eat a plant-based diet. I'm already accustomed to a vegan diet and enjoy it. Animal products contain LDL cholesterol (plants don't). Animal products also contain saturated fats. There are only a couple of plant-based foods that have saturated fats (mainly coconut and palm oil).

According to a UN report released in 2010, a meat and dairy based diet is not sustainable in the long run, and is reponsible for much of the 19% percent of the greenhouse gases emmitted by agribusiness (http://www.guardian.co.uk...). A common question environmentalists ask themselves is "Is it possible to be a meat-eating environmentalist?".

Just interested - are you a vegan or a vegetarian?

Vegan. I was actually wondering the same thing about you. Seems like I heard you were veg once but not sure.

I am not currently, however, I was and am considering it. I take the arguments for the position very seriously.

Yeah, I do too. Let me know if I can help you out with any dietary advice or book recommendations you might need.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it