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Is Caffeine Consumpion Rational

vbaculum
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4/5/2012 11:35:04 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Do habitual caffeine consumers (coffee/tea drinkers) have an advantage over those who abstain from all caffeine. That's to say, are people who regularly drink caffeinated beverages more mentally agile and alert than those who don't. I've grown suspicious that, by routinely drinking coffee, I am simply restoring my alertness levels to their normal states - the same states I would have if I wasn't addicted to caffeine.

So I went from 5 cups of coffee a day to 1 under the belief that drinking coffee wasn't rational. Getting to this point was easy (though it took a while). However, I can't seem to kick that last cup of coffee (which I drink slowly over the day). Even though I've been on one cup a day for at least a month, I still feel sort of sluggish - like I haven't been able get to a normal state of alertness.

So, what do you think? Does it benefit one to routinely drink a few cups of coffee through out the day? Or does it simply create the illusion of increased alertness, even when what is really happening is a simple restoration of normal alertness levels that one would have if one weren't addicted to coffee? And does anyone know why the last cup is the hardest to give up?
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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4/5/2012 11:39:46 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 11:35:04 AM, vbaculum wrote:
Do habitual caffeine consumers (coffee/tea drinkers) have an advantage over those who abstain from all caffeine. That's to say, are people who regularly drink caffeinated beverages more mentally agile and alert than those who don't. I've grown suspicious that, by routinely drinking coffee, I am simply restoring my alertness levels to their normal states - the same states I would have if I wasn't addicted to caffeine.

So I went from 5 cups of coffee a day to 1 under the belief that drinking coffee wasn't rational. Getting to this point was easy (though it took a while). However, I can't seem to kick that last cup of coffee (which I drink slowly over the day). Even though I've been on one cup a day for at least a month, I still feel sort of sluggish - like I haven't been able get to a normal state of alertness.

So, what do you think? Does it benefit one to routinely drink a few cups of coffee through out the day? Or does it simply create the illusion of increased alertness, even when what is really happening is a simple restoration of normal alertness levels that one would have if one weren't addicted to coffee? And does anyone know why the last cup is the hardest to give up?

Whoa, five cups?

Most people don't drink tea for the caffeine though. There are a whole host of health benefits.

http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...

I try to drink either a cup of tea or matcha a day. I used to be a huge coffee drinker but it made me very jittery and effed up my sleep.

I'd have to look up what studies say about mental alertness... be right back.
nonentity
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4/5/2012 11:40:51 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 11:39:46 AM, nonentity wrote:

I try to drink either a cup of tea* or matcha a day. I used to be a huge coffee drinker but it made me very jittery and effed up my sleep.

I'd have to look up what studies say about mental alertness... be right back.

*loose leaf green tea. None of that bagged sh!t :p
nonentity
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4/5/2012 11:47:39 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Based on the few abstracts I have read it does seem to be that caffeine does increase mental alertness.

Effects of repeated doses of caffeine on performance and alertness: New data and secondary analyses.
Hewlett, Paul; Smith, Andrew. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental22. 6(Aug 2007): 339-350.
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Abstract (summary)
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Rationale: The effects of caffeine on mood and performance are well established. Some authors suggest that caffeine merely reverses effects of caffeine withdrawal rather than having direct behavioural effects. It has also been suggested that withdrawal may be removed by a first dose of caffeine and further doses have little subsequent effect. These issues are examined here. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine whether caffeine withdrawal influenced mood and performance by comparing regular consumers who had been withdrawn from caffeine overnight with non-consumers. Following this repeated caffeine doses were administered to test the claim that repeated dosing has no extra effect on mood or performance. Secondary analyses of data collected after a day of normal caffeine consumption were also carried out to examine some alternative explanations of their results which showed effects of caffeine after a day of normal caffeine consumption. Methods: One hundred and twenty volunteers participated in the study. Regular caffeine consumption was assessed by questionnaire and this showed that 36 of the volunteers did not regularly consume caffeinated beverages. Volunteers were instructed to abstain from caffeine overnight and then completed a baseline session measuring mood and a range of cognitive functions at 08.00 the next day. Following this volunteers were given 0, or 1 mg/kg caffeine in a milkshake, glucose solution or water (at 09:00), followed by a second 0 or 1 mg/kg caffeine dose (at 09:40) and the test battery repeated at 10:00. Results: The baseline data showed no effect of overnight caffeine withdrawal on mood or performance. In contrast, caffeine challenge improved vigilance performance and prevented decreases in alertness induced by completion of the task battery. The magnitude of these effects increased as a function of the number of doses of caffeine given. Secondary analyses of data from Christopher et al. (2003) also confirmed that effects of caffeine did not depend on length of withdrawal. Conclusions: The present findings show no effect of overnight caffeine withdrawal on mood and performance. Caffeine challenge did have the predicted effect on alertness and vigilance, with the size of the effects increasing with caffeine dose. These findings suggest that the effects of caffeine are not due to reversal of effects of withdrawal, a view confirmed by secondary analyses of data collected after a day of normal caffeine consumption. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)
PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
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4/5/2012 2:36:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The effects of caffeine on mood and performance are well established. Some authors suggest that caffeine merely reverses effects of caffeine withdrawal rather than having direct behavioural effects.:

I would imagine ^THIS^ would best explain the sluggishness. Caffeine in moderation is okay. I have one cup at work, never at home or anywhere else for that matter.

I have no doubt there are some positive attributes to caffeine, but in general coffee is a diaretic, which depletes the body of water. Much like sugar, it gives you a quick boost, but the crash is hard. In the long run you are doing yourself a disservice.

As of now, your brain receptors are telling you that you need this, when in fact it doesn't. Give it a little time and your receptors won't need that "fix" any longer.
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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4/5/2012 4:01:49 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 11:47:39 AM, nonentity wrote:
Based on the few abstracts I have read it does seem to be that caffeine does increase mental alertness.

Effects of repeated doses of caffeine on performance and alertness: New data and secondary analyses.
Hewlett, Paul; Smith, Andrew. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental22. 6(Aug 2007): 339-350.
Turn on hit highlighting for speaking browsers
Abstract (summary)
Translate Abstract
Rationale: The effects of caffeine on mood and performance are well established. Some authors suggest that caffeine merely reverses effects of caffeine withdrawal rather than having direct behavioural effects. It has also been suggested that withdrawal may be removed by a first dose of caffeine and further doses have little subsequent effect. These issues are examined here. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine whether caffeine withdrawal influenced mood and performance by comparing regular consumers who had been withdrawn from caffeine overnight with non-consumers. Following this repeated caffeine doses were administered to test the claim that repeated dosing has no extra effect on mood or performance. Secondary analyses of data collected after a day of normal caffeine consumption were also carried out to examine some alternative explanations of their results which showed effects of caffeine after a day of normal caffeine consumption. Methods: One hundred and twenty volunteers participated in the study. Regular caffeine consumption was assessed by questionnaire and this showed that 36 of the volunteers did not regularly consume caffeinated beverages. Volunteers were instructed to abstain from caffeine overnight and then completed a baseline session measuring mood and a range of cognitive functions at 08.00 the next day. Following this volunteers were given 0, or 1 mg/kg caffeine in a milkshake, glucose solution or water (at 09:00), followed by a second 0 or 1 mg/kg caffeine dose (at 09:40) and the test battery repeated at 10:00. Results: The baseline data showed no effect of overnight caffeine withdrawal on mood or performance. In contrast, caffeine challenge improved vigilance performance and prevented decreases in alertness induced by completion of the task battery. The magnitude of these effects increased as a function of the number of doses of caffeine given. Secondary analyses of data from Christopher et al. (2003) also confirmed that effects of caffeine did not depend on length of withdrawal. Conclusions: The present findings show no effect of overnight caffeine withdrawal on mood and performance. Caffeine challenge did have the predicted effect on alertness and vigilance, with the size of the effects increasing with caffeine dose. These findings suggest that the effects of caffeine are not due to reversal of effects of withdrawal, a view confirmed by secondary analyses of data collected after a day of normal caffeine consumption. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)

It was kind of you to look this up.

It seems like the science is a little inconclusive, though, on whether routine caffeine consumption, all things considered, is a preferable to no routine caffeine consumption.

I may give green tea a shot if I can't part with caffeine. I've never had matcha before but that sounds good too.

So what makes loose leave tea better than bagged?
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:08:58 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Caffeine has a long half-life, so there's a chance that you'll be in a perpetual cycle of just dealing with your withdrawal symptoms.

I purposely keep myself caffeine sensitive by abstaining from caffeine completely, and using it only when I need a boost for an exam or something. Being completely caffeine sensitized, I can add hours of alert, productive studying with just a half a cup of coffee. It really does pack a kick and it is extremely effective if you use it the way I do.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
nonentity
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4/5/2012 4:20:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:01:49 PM, vbaculum wrote:

It was kind of you to look this up.

It seems like the science is a little inconclusive, though, on whether routine caffeine consumption, all things considered, is a preferable to no routine caffeine consumption.

I may give green tea a shot if I can't part with caffeine. I've never had matcha before but that sounds good too.

So what makes loose leave tea better than bagged?

Yeah, to be honest, I don't believe being a coffee drinker is better than being a non-coffee drinker. Although caffeine does make you more alert, I think it's also probable that you are less alert and less able to focus between drinks.

To be honest, matcha is kind of disgusting. If you drink it with just water, it's quite pleasant at first and it tastes basically like grass. But the powder sits at the bottom, and when you get to the end, it's got this pungent, horrible taste. So what I do is I mix the matcha powder with yogurt then add orange juice and blend. It can taste quite good as a smoothie.

As for loose leaf vs tea bags, it's about quality and taste. http://coffeetea.about.com... Of course, sometimes I bag my own loose tea if I'm on the go and there can be bagged, good quality tea, but when I say "tea bag" I mean it in a generic way, if that makes sense.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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4/5/2012 4:36:11 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:08:58 PM, Kleptin wrote:
Caffeine has a long half-life, so there's a chance that you'll be in a perpetual cycle of just dealing with your withdrawal symptoms.

Interesting. I didn't know that.

I purposely keep myself caffeine sensitive by abstaining from caffeine completely, and using it only when I need a boost for an exam or something. Being completely caffeine sensitized, I can add hours of alert, productive studying with just a half a cup of coffee. It really does pack a kick and it is extremely effective if you use it the way I do.

Yeah, that's the place I would like to get to. I love the buzz and alertness I get from a stiff cup.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:38:01 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:36:11 PM, vbaculum wrote:
Yeah, that's the place I would like to get to. I love the buzz and alertness I get from a stiff cup.

I misread that.

Anyway, you only get the good benefits if you've been off caffeine for a long time. It tends to have little to no effect if you've had a couple doses even in the span of 2 weeks.

I'm usually off it for a month and a half between uses.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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4/5/2012 4:47:07 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:20:56 PM, nonentity wrote:
At 4/5/2012 4:01:49 PM, vbaculum wrote:

It was kind of you to look this up.

It seems like the science is a little inconclusive, though, on whether routine caffeine consumption, all things considered, is a preferable to no routine caffeine consumption.

I may give green tea a shot if I can't part with caffeine. I've never had matcha before but that sounds good too.

So what makes loose leave tea better than bagged?

Yeah, to be honest, I don't believe being a coffee drinker is better than being a non-coffee drinker. Although caffeine does make you more alert, I think it's also probable that you are less alert and less able to focus between drinks.
That's probably true. When I was at 5 a day, my alertness level probably resembled a sine wave; I would get tired and have another cup repeatedly throughout the day. I enjoyed the ride, though it was a pain to have to always tend to making coffee.

To be honest, matcha is kind of disgusting. If you drink it with just water, it's quite pleasant at first and it tastes basically like grass. But the powder sits at the bottom, and when you get to the end, it's got this pungent, horrible taste. So what I do is I mix the matcha powder with yogurt then add orange juice and blend. It can taste quite good as a smoothie.

As for loose leaf vs tea bags, it's about quality and taste. http://coffeetea.about.com... Of course, sometimes I bag my own loose tea if I'm on the go and there can be bagged, good quality tea, but when I say "tea bag" I mean it in a generic way, if that makes sense.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Ren
Posts: 7,102
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4/5/2012 8:00:44 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 11:35:04 AM, vbaculum wrote:
Do habitual caffeine consumers (coffee/tea drinkers) have an advantage over those who abstain from all caffeine. That's to say, are people who regularly drink caffeinated beverages more mentally agile and alert than those who don't. I've grown suspicious that, by routinely drinking coffee, I am simply restoring my alertness levels to their normal states - the same states I would have if I wasn't addicted to caffeine.

So I went from 5 cups of coffee a day to 1 under the belief that drinking coffee wasn't rational. Getting to this point was easy (though it took a while). However, I can't seem to kick that last cup of coffee (which I drink slowly over the day). Even though I've been on one cup a day for at least a month, I still feel sort of sluggish - like I haven't been able get to a normal state of alertness.

So, what do you think? Does it benefit one to routinely drink a few cups of coffee through out the day? Or does it simply create the illusion of increased alertness, even when what is really happening is a simple restoration of normal alertness levels that one would have if one weren't addicted to coffee? And does anyone know why the last cup is the hardest to give up?

I drink coffee because I like it.

If I really needed a stimulant to facilitate myself from rest to functionality, then I'm likely suffering from a moderate to severe health condition.

But, in reality, it keeps me engaged when I would be otherwise bored and listless, while tasting and feeling good while consumed with a good smoke.
sadolite
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4/5/2012 8:49:21 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I live on cigarettes and mountain dew. Do what you want and quit worrying about it. What is the point of life if all you are going to do is worry about the things that bring joy to your life. Govt will take on that role soon enough. Drink coffee while you still can.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

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CrazyPerson
Posts: 1,114
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4/15/2012 9:15:41 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Most substances which activate lower realms of consciousness (as depicted by Leary's 8 circuit model) such as opiates, stimulants (caffeine), and alcohol generally result in tolerance. Tolerance is when more of the substance is needed to achieve less of the effect for a shorter amount of time. Tolerance to caffeine is widely accepted as the case indeed. Consuming caffeine at first is thought to increase the rational thinking mind to a more active state. Whether or not this is useful depends on what you're trying to do. Stimulants cause stimulation of though processes but can always lead to cycling or looping thoughts which is generally a negative attribute. Is it rational to drink coffee? Let's see... if you are tired but have to go to work, then a rational decision would be to ingest a stimulant to better prepare you for the task at hand. Is drinking coffee everyday rational? Not really, because it leads to the reverse effect that you set out to achieve initially.
But we try to pretend, you see, that the external world exists altogether independently of us.
- - - Watts
The moralist is the person who tells people that they ought to be unselfish, when they still feel like egos, and his efforts are always and invariably futile.
- - - Watts