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The Five Second Rule

Ragnar
Posts: 1,658
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2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.
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bluesteel
Posts: 12,301
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2/25/2014 4:31:14 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Things that our hands touch have more bacteria on them than do things that our feet or even our butt's touch. MythBusters studied which places had the most dangerous bacteria growing on them. Computer keyboard far outranked toilet seat.

Ergo, the five second rule in the floor makes more sense than on the table. Tables are actually "dirtier" on the metric we care about (bacteria) than floors. A speck of dust won't kill you but necrotizing fasciotitis will.
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
Such
Posts: 1,110
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2/25/2014 6:49:40 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 4:31:14 PM, bluesteel wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Things that our hands touch have more bacteria on them than do things that our feet or even our butt's touch. MythBusters studied which places had the most dangerous bacteria growing on them. Computer keyboard far outranked toilet seat.

Ergo, the five second rule in the floor makes more sense than on the table. Tables are actually "dirtier" on the metric we care about (bacteria) than floors. A speck of dust won't kill you but necrotizing fasciotitis will.

Naw, son.

Your feet at constantly in contact with the floor.

Accordingly, germs (bacteria, viruses, fungi) spread more easily through contact with the floor, because everything is constantly in contact with the floor given gravity, and things that move are constantly spreading whatever is on the floor around.

Moreover, whatever falls off of anything ends up on the floor.

Eating anything off the floor is disgusting. Whatever fell on the floor, just go get another, srsly. Ugh.
bluesteel
Posts: 12,301
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2/25/2014 7:15:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 6:49:40 PM, Such wrote:
At 2/25/2014 4:31:14 PM, bluesteel wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Things that our hands touch have more bacteria on them than do things that our feet or even our butt's touch. MythBusters studied which places had the most dangerous bacteria growing on them. Computer keyboard far outranked toilet seat.

Ergo, the five second rule in the floor makes more sense than on the table. Tables are actually "dirtier" on the metric we care about (bacteria) than floors. A speck of dust won't kill you but necrotizing fasciotitis will.

Naw, son.

Your feet at constantly in contact with the floor.

Accordingly, germs (bacteria, viruses, fungi) spread more easily through contact with the floor, because everything is constantly in contact with the floor given gravity, and things that move are constantly spreading whatever is on the floor around.

Moreover, whatever falls off of anything ends up on the floor.

Eating anything off the floor is disgusting. Whatever fell on the floor, just go get another, srsly. Ugh.

Germ theory, son. Bacteria generally can only survive on warm things.

But yeah, in terms of grossness, the five second rule is BS. It matters how dirty the floor is and how wet vs. dry the food is (cheesecake, forget it; a chip - maybe).
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
nummi
Posts: 294
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2/25/2014 8:10:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
You do realize our lives are dependent on bacteria?
You do know our digestive system is mostly bacteria?
You do know that different kinds of foods have different bacteria for their digestion in our gut? Meat has its own, fruits have their own, vegetables have their own, etc. Where do you think those bacteria come from? They aren't in our genetics...
You do know it is essential for our body to come into contact with otherwise harmful and bad bacteria, to get to know what is out there and build resistance against the bad ones? And truth be told, they are everywhere; if you think those bad bacteria aren't on the food you consume, whatever food, wherever, however it was prepared - it doesn't matter, they are on it and you eat them no matter what you think. This fear of bacteria is hypocritical, to say the least.
You do know your entire body is covered in bacteria? They are in your flesh as well. They are everywhere.

For millions and millions and millions of years no one even knew about bacteria... You should be more concerned about synthesized chemicals, fertilizers, pesticides, pills and drugs, industry wastes, etc., because compared to those bacteria are less than nothing.

Without bacteria we wouldn't be where we are, we wouldn't even exist. So, next time you say yuck or disgusting, or whatever as good, think about your skin and your gut and all those bacteria living on and in you, off of you.

But I suppose it doesn't matter if your diet is wrong in the first place...

Seriously... people are literally eating themselves dead with processed and industrialized crap and they worry about some little things that have been around for so many millions of years. Things their bodies have in fact evolved to deal with. Things that are essential for their own life.
Sure, there are some bad ones that can do harm, real harm. But if you ate right, again, you'd be far more likely to get hit by a car, or lightning even.

So, how about enough of this kind of BS and concentrate on that which actually is killing people more and more each year? And as well on such things like why are there so many humans on the planet? You know, actual productive thinking? The kind that produces at least theoretical solutions to present problems around the globe. Because those very same solutions are just objective thinking away. And what is possible in theory, assuming everything relevant is accounted for, is possible in practice.
Logic_on_rails
Posts: 2,445
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2/26/2014 2:48:48 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
As a biology student said to me recently... the rule is absolutely stupid. The no. of germs that is 'added' occurs upon impact with the ground or whatever else food collides with. Now, of course, there are factors impacting how quickly bacteria spread. But whether its 5 or 10 seconds, the difference is immaterial when compared to the no. added on impact; bacteria do not scuttle along at the speed being imagined.

And there goes a myth.
"Tis not in mortals to command success
But we"ll do more, Sempronius, we"ll deserve it
bluesteel
Posts: 12,301
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2/26/2014 3:03:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 2:48:48 AM, Logic_on_rails wrote:
As a biology student said to me recently... the rule is absolutely stupid. The no. of germs that is 'added' occurs upon impact with the ground or whatever else food collides with. Now, of course, there are factors impacting how quickly bacteria spread. But whether its 5 or 10 seconds, the difference is immaterial when compared to the no. added on impact; bacteria do not scuttle along at the speed being imagined.

And there goes a myth.

well said. but you ignored numm's argument that bacteria are already in your mouth!!! so who cares? and they're a million years old!! nothing that old can hurt you!! (said the human to the T-rex)
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
YYW
Posts: 36,303
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3/20/2014 2:40:40 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Bacteria are transferred immediately on contact. The five second rule is idiotic. If you believe it's safe to eat food that's been on the floor, let me also introduce you to some tasty and delicious heroin.
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Ragnar
Posts: 1,658
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3/20/2014 8:48:49 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/20/2014 2:40:40 AM, YYW wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Bacteria are transferred immediately on contact. The five second rule is idiotic. If you believe it's safe to eat food that's been on the floor, let me also introduce you to some tasty and delicious heroin.

You must keep a really filthy house, if brief exposure is as dangerous as heroin... but yeah, I hope no one believes that nothing transfers until the fifth second, it's a matter of how much is likely to transfer over said length of time.
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Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,285
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3/20/2014 7:38:22 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Of course the bacteria transfers, the question is whether or not the panic is justified. In truth, people make waaaaay too big a deal about 'bacteria', as if it's one monolithic group of microscopic villains, all intent on murdering people if they make skin contact, and that the only way to survive is to maintain a carefully sterile (lol) environment. Stay away from feces, bodily fluids, spoiled food, people in general, and hospitals. Those are the things most likely host dangerous bacteria. You have more of a chance of getting sick eating in a public restaurant, no matter how immaculately kept, than you do eating a chip which fell on the floor (unless you make a habit of walking through poop). I wouldn't eat something gooey, just because of the ick factor, but a chip or cracker? Fair game (if it's my floor).
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
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YYW
Posts: 36,303
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3/25/2014 12:58:24 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/20/2014 8:48:49 AM, Ragnar wrote:
At 3/20/2014 2:40:40 AM, YYW wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Bacteria are transferred immediately on contact. The five second rule is idiotic. If you believe it's safe to eat food that's been on the floor, let me also introduce you to some tasty and delicious heroin.

You must keep a really filthy house, if brief exposure is as dangerous as heroin...

Goddamnit dude, learn to read. I never said that.
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Ragnar
Posts: 1,658
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3/25/2014 2:32:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/25/2014 12:58:24 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/20/2014 8:48:49 AM, Ragnar wrote:
At 3/20/2014 2:40:40 AM, YYW wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Bacteria are transferred immediately on contact. The five second rule is idiotic. If you believe it's safe to eat food that's been on the floor, let me also introduce you to some tasty and delicious heroin.

You must keep a really filthy house, if brief exposure is as dangerous as heroin...

Goddamnit dude, learn to read. I never said that.

Sorry for leaving out the qualifying statement... the danger level of brief food to floor exposure, is apparently highly comparable to "tasty and delicious heroin."
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YYW
Posts: 36,303
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3/25/2014 2:35:27 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/25/2014 2:32:30 AM, Ragnar wrote:
At 3/25/2014 12:58:24 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/20/2014 8:48:49 AM, Ragnar wrote:
At 3/20/2014 2:40:40 AM, YYW wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Bacteria are transferred immediately on contact. The five second rule is idiotic. If you believe it's safe to eat food that's been on the floor, let me also introduce you to some tasty and delicious heroin.

You must keep a really filthy house, if brief exposure is as dangerous as heroin...

Goddamnit dude, learn to read. I never said that.

Sorry for leaving out the qualifying statement... the danger level of brief food to floor exposure, is apparently highly comparable to "tasty and delicious heroin."

I neither stated, nor implied that either. Sheesh.
Tsar of DDO
Jonbonbon
Posts: 2,760
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3/25/2014 8:29:01 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

1) If the floor is spotless and you know has either been recently cleaned or is regularly cleaned, five seconds rule applies.

2) If the floor is spotless but you are unsure as to how clean it actually is, three second rule applies for safety.

3) If the floor is noticeably dirty, you have one second to pick up your food.

4) If it goes in the corner or under the fridge, throw it away. It's not worth it.
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Linkish1O2
Posts: 2,003
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3/31/2014 8:21:06 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
it works, as long as your not in the public toilett.
"I am a mystery and to unlock the mystery at my core, one must simply embrace slendermans hug with no fear."- me

"I hearby declare myself a phantom in the darkness."-me
hiiwannaarguewityou
Posts: 3
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4/2/2014 9:40:17 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 7:15:13 PM, bluesteel wrote:
At 2/25/2014 6:49:40 PM, Such wrote:
At 2/25/2014 4:31:14 PM, bluesteel wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Things that our hands touch have more bacteria on them than do things that our feet or even our butt's touch. MythBusters studied which places had the most dangerous bacteria growing on them. Computer keyboard far outranked toilet seat.

Ergo, the five second rule in the floor makes more sense than on the table. Tables are actually "dirtier" on the metric we care about (bacteria) than floors. A speck of dust won't kill you but necrotizing fasciotitis will.

Naw, son.

Your feet at constantly in contact with the floor.

Accordingly, germs (bacteria, viruses, fungi) spread more easily through contact with the floor, because everything is constantly in contact with the floor given gravity, and things that move are constantly spreading whatever is on the floor around.

Moreover, whatever falls off of anything ends up on the floor.

Eating anything off the floor is disgusting. Whatever fell on the floor, just go get another, srsly. Ugh.

Germ theory, son. Bacteria generally can only survive on warm things.

But yeah, in terms of grossness, the five second rule is BS. It matters how dirty the floor is and how wet vs. dry the food is (cheesecake, forget it; a chip - maybe).

**There is an urban myth behind the "5 second rule"; it being okay to eat food five seconds after it hit the ground. Although people have long followed the 5 second rule,it was unclear whether it actually helped until these studies were released.

The five second rule was scientifically tested and proven to be authentic that those five seconds are crucial. Although the food dropped on the floor and collected bacteria,the bacteria is not harmful (before the 5 seconds). Once Food is picked up just a few seconds after being dropped, it is less likely to contain bacteria than if it is left for longer periods of time. This study was researched at Aston University"s School of Life and Health Sciences. The studies show that time has a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a morsel food. The time exceeding "5 seconds" allows more bacteria to have extra time to latch on to the piece of food, making the consumer more at risk of catching a cold or getting sick.
hiiwannaarguewityou
Posts: 3
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5/26/2014 9:05:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
There is an Urban Myth behind the "5 second rule". The myth claims that it is okay to eat food five seconds after it falling on the ground. Although people have long followed the 5 second rule, it is unclear whether it actually applied until studies were released from Aston University"s School of Life and Health Sciences.
The five second rule was scientifically tested and proven to be authentic and that those five seconds when food is on the ground is crucial. Although the food dropped on the floor collected bacteria, the bacteria is not considered harmful (before those five seconds are over). Once the food is picked up just a few seconds after it being dropped, it is less likely to contain bacteria than if the food is left on the floor for an extended period of time (more than the 5 seconds). This study shows that time has a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a morsel of food. The time exceeding the 5 seconds allows more bacteria to have extra time to latch onto the piece of dropped food, making the consumer more at risk of catching a cold or getting sick.
english123
Posts: 2
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6/1/2014 10:38:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/26/2014 9:05:48 PM, hiiwannaarguewityou wrote:
There is an Urban Myth behind the "5 second rule". The myth claims that it is okay to eat food five seconds after it falling on the ground. Although people have long followed the 5 second rule, it is unclear whether it actually applied until studies were released from Aston University"s School of Life and Health Sciences.
The five second rule was scientifically tested and proven to be authentic and that those five seconds when food is on the ground is crucial. Although the food dropped on the floor collected bacteria, the bacteria is not considered harmful (before those five seconds are over). Once the food is picked up just a few seconds after it being dropped, it is less likely to contain bacteria than if the food is left on the floor for an extended period of time (more than the 5 seconds). This study shows that time has a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a morsel of food. The time exceeding the 5 seconds allows more bacteria to have extra time to latch onto the piece of dropped food, making the consumer more at risk of catching a cold or getting sick.

This argument contains an inherent contradiction. How can the five second rule be authentic when at the same time scientific studies have proven that food collects bacteria within five seconds of being dropped?! The Aston University"s School of Life and Health Sciences was quoted in this argument as supporting the authenticity of the five second rule. However, the lead Professor of the study was quoted saying, "consuming food dropped on the floor still carries an infection risk as it very much depends on which bacteria are present on the floor at the time." How can this study be the sole supporter of this argument when even the main scientist gives reason to question the five second rule"s validity?! While saying that food picks up less bacteria within the first five seconds may be true, dangers including the bacteria pre-existent on the floor can cause serious infection.

Scientific studies were conducted to delegitimatize the five second rule step by step. The first common misconception regarding the five second rule, the idea that food picked up within five seconds is free of bacteria, was disproven at the University of Illinois. The procedure of the study was simple; floor tiles were coated with bacteria and then gummy bears were dropped onto their surfaces. The leading researcher on this study concluded that bacteria was indeed transferred onto the gummy bears. The second scientific study done disproved the theory that the bacteria transferred within those initial five seconds cannot be harmful. A study conducted at Clemson University in South Carolina tested the level of transferred salmonella onto fallen foods. This study concluded that the longer food is left on the floor, the more bacteria it collects. However, the study also concluded that the amount of bacteria the food particle collects within the first five seconds is more than enough to cause infection. This study directly contradicts a statement made in this argument that, "the bacteria is not considered harmful (before those five seconds are over)."

The studies done to test the validity of the five second rule highlight the risk involved when following it. The scientifically proven ability of the bacteria transferred onto food within the first five seconds to cause infection makes it very clear that there are great risks involved in following the five second rule.
Mr_Man
Posts: 2
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6/8/2014 10:27:12 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/2/2014 9:40:17 PM, hiiwannaarguewityou wrote:
At 2/25/2014 7:15:13 PM, bluesteel wrote:
At 2/25/2014 6:49:40 PM, Such wrote:
At 2/25/2014 4:31:14 PM, bluesteel wrote:
At 2/25/2014 3:56:34 PM, Ragnar wrote:
Having recently debated it, I'm a little curious what are peoples general thoughts?

To me it really depends on the floor in question, however I know some people use it if the food even touches the table.

Things that our hands touch have more bacteria on them than do things that our feet or even our butt's touch. MythBusters studied which places had the most dangerous bacteria growing on them. Computer keyboard far outranked toilet seat.

Ergo, the five second rule in the floor makes more sense than on the table. Tables are actually "dirtier" on the metric we care about (bacteria) than floors. A speck of dust won't kill you but necrotizing fasciotitis will.

Naw, son.

Your feet at constantly in contact with the floor.

Accordingly, germs (bacteria, viruses, fungi) spread more easily through contact with the floor, because everything is constantly in contact with the floor given gravity, and things that move are constantly spreading whatever is on the floor around.

Moreover, whatever falls off of anything ends up on the floor.

Eating anything off the floor is disgusting. Whatever fell on the floor, just go get another, srsly. Ugh.

Germ theory, son. Bacteria generally can only survive on warm things.

But yeah, in terms of grossness, the five second rule is BS. It matters how dirty the floor is and how wet vs. dry the food is (cheesecake, forget it; a chip - maybe).


**There is an urban myth behind the "5 second rule"; it being okay to eat food five seconds after it hit the ground. Although people have long followed the 5 second rule,it was unclear whether it actually helped until these studies were released.

The five second rule was scientifically tested and proven to be authentic that those five seconds are crucial. Although the food dropped on the floor and collected bacteria,the bacteria is not harmful (before the 5 seconds). Once Food is picked up just a few seconds after being dropped, it is less likely to contain bacteria than if it is left for longer periods of time. This study was researched at Aston University"s School of Life and Health Sciences. The studies show that time has a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a morsel food. The time exceeding "5 seconds" allows more bacteria to have extra time to latch on to the piece of food, making the consumer more at risk of catching a cold or getting sick.

Although it is a fact fact that bacteria doesn't cling to food as much within 5 seconds of hitting the ground, is that true for all foods, sticky or hard?