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Insanity/delusion

Atheism
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7/13/2010 1:54:04 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
Can you be insane or deluded, and know you are insane/deluded at the same time?
For example, you believe there is a wall in front of you. However, you know there is not one.
This was brought upon my rereading of Hatchet and its sequels, and how I read that the main character asks a question:Do insane people know they are insane?

It was brought on by this, and C_N's insatiable desire to believe in a God, but he knows there is not one. Could he still delude himself, but can he still retain being deluded while still knowing there isn't one? Discuss.
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badger
Posts: 11,793
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7/13/2010 4:00:33 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 3:57:20 AM, Puck wrote:
Schizophrenics can be taught to recognise their hallucinations.

like in a beautiful mind?
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Puck
Posts: 6,457
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7/13/2010 4:07:29 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 4:00:33 AM, badger wrote:
At 7/13/2010 3:57:20 AM, Puck wrote:
Schizophrenics can be taught to recognise their hallucinations.

like in a beautiful mind?

Yeah. It's an increasingly widespread psychiatric treatment for when anti psychotics fail. There's organisations based specifically upon it's use too for those that wish to avoid the anti psychotics all together.
tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.
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badger
Posts: 11,793
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7/13/2010 5:08:58 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 4:07:29 AM, Puck wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:00:33 AM, badger wrote:
At 7/13/2010 3:57:20 AM, Puck wrote:
Schizophrenics can be taught to recognise their hallucinations.

like in a beautiful mind?

Yeah. It's an increasingly widespread psychiatric treatment for when anti psychotics fail. There's organisations based specifically upon it's use too for those that wish to avoid the anti psychotics all together.

that is class. and here was me worried about drugs turning me into a schizo.
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PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
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7/13/2010 5:15:57 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
Do insane people know they are insane?:

Some know they have a propensity to behave in ways that others would deem it "crazy." I don't think, though, they have a full grasp on the concept.

At least that's been my experience having worked in hospitals in the past.
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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7/13/2010 11:58:31 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 1:54:04 AM, Atheism wrote:
Can you be insane or deluded, and know you are insane/deluded at the same time?
For example, you believe there is a wall in front of you. However, you know there is not one.
This was brought upon my rereading of Hatchet and its sequels, and how I read that the main character asks a question:Do insane people know they are insane?

It was brought on by this, and C_N's insatiable desire to believe in a God, but he knows there is not one. Could he still delude himself, but can he still retain being deluded while still knowing there isn't one? Discuss.

I think that's where paranoia comes in. You don't know what's real and what's not, and what's truth and what's not and then you start to question everything, including other people's motives. And then you start to wonder if perhaps you're actually seeing things as they are for the first time, and the rest of the world is deluded and prosecuting you for able to see truth.

I woke up out of a coma with no idea how I got there and my episodic memory gone. I can tell you that there was an overwhelming feeling of disorientation and all I could do was take the word of the people around me for what was valid truth because I did not know myself where I stood in relation to the world, to my life. Other than asking people around you to verify that what you see and feel is real, there really is no other way, unless you somehow snap out of your delusion.

I don't know if I'm making sense or not, but I could liken it to being colour blind. My dad knows he can't tell the difference between red and green and if you ask him to guess, he's usually wrong. But using our family as a point of reference, he can ask us what colour his clothes are so that he goes out in public looking decent. Otherwise he's out there wearing a pink dress shirt thinking it's green.
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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7/13/2010 1:25:08 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice.

False. What about people with OCD or tourettes? They have a disorder, know they're acting according to said disorder but they don't have a choice. What about people with multiple personalities?

If you have a choice you're not truly insane.

False...

However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.

True, like pedophiles.

So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

A schizo can recognize their hallucination and thus know they're hallucinating (so not sane), though that doesn't get rid of the hallucination... so it's not a choice. In some cases you can choose to act a certain way because you know something is a halluncination or part of an illness, but the illness (like schizophrenia) doesn't just go away or stop being a problem because you recognize it.
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lovelife
Posts: 14,629
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7/14/2010 9:13:43 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
I think if you have delusions, you could know that other people think you are delusional, but can/will keep believing in it.

It's kinda like with Christians, they know people that don't believe and listen to how they hear God or whatever think they are insane, but they keep believing. The same could be true about any mental disorder. Human nature is to not always believe everything everyone says, so most wouldn't just believe they are delusional based on what someone says. They decide if they believe what they see is real. Most assume that what they see is real, so they would rather believe that as truth rather than what someone else says.

Of course I'm not a expert so I could be wrong, but thats just what I think.
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Cerebral_Narcissist
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7/14/2010 9:36:57 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 1:54:04 AM, Atheism wrote:
It was brought on by this, and C_N's insatiable desire to believe in a God, but he knows there is not one. Could he still delude himself, but can he still retain being deluded while still knowing there isn't one? Discuss.

Incidentally I never proposed self-delusion!
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
lovelife
Posts: 14,629
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7/14/2010 1:14:47 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
Alot of people that know me think I'm insane. I do not 100% believe them. I think I'm pretty much fine.

Actually I have more faith in myself and my sanity since the main thing that concerns people everyone on this site said I was normal, maybe over sensitive, but not insane.
Without Royal there is a hole inside of me, I have no choice but to leave
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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7/14/2010 1:37:13 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/14/2010 1:14:47 PM, lovelife wrote:
Alot of people that know me think I'm insane. I do not 100% believe them. I think I'm pretty much fine.

Actually I have more faith in myself and my sanity since the main thing that concerns people everyone on this site said I was normal, maybe over sensitive, but not insane.

If you were insane, I still wouldn't judge you! I'm open about my insanity since I don't like BS and secrets! I would rather be sensitive like you though then insane....
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
brian_eggleston
Posts: 3,347
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8/7/2010 4:58:28 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

There used to be a lot of stigma attached to mental health issues but as more and more famous and successful people reveal that they are receiving treatment for mental disorders, sufferers are becoming more understood and accepted.

1 in 4 people suffer from mental health problems - myself included - I take mild seditives to calm me down and I am also liable to bouts of depression, even though there is no reason for me to be unhappy (stress and depression are two sides of the same coin, by the way).

It's good to be honest and open about these things.
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annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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8/7/2010 6:11:03 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/7/2010 4:58:28 PM, brian_eggleston wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

There used to be a lot of stigma attached to mental health issues but as more and more famous and successful people reveal that they are receiving treatment for mental disorders, sufferers are becoming more understood and accepted.

1 in 4 people suffer from mental health problems - myself included - I take mild seditives to calm me down and I am also liable to bouts of depression, even though there is no reason for me to be unhappy (stress and depression are two sides of the same coin, by the way).

It's good to be honest and open about these things.

Exactly. I'm a Youth Suicide Prevention Educator and most of my work is trying to get rid of stigmas. So many kids keep their problems to themselves and then it's too late. It's so sad...
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/8/2010 12:10:22 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/7/2010 4:58:28 PM, brian_eggleston wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

There used to be a lot of stigma attached to mental health issues but as more and more famous and successful people reveal that they are receiving treatment for mental disorders, sufferers are becoming more understood and accepted.

1 in 4 people suffer from mental health problems - myself included - I take mild seditives to calm me down and I am also liable to bouts of depression, even though there is no reason for me to be unhappy (stress and depression are two sides of the same coin, by the way).

It's good to be honest and open about these things.

I've struggled with depression for many years, indeed it has slightly derailed my life. Or rather I allowed it to. I am over the worst of it but I still have certain issues that are manifesting. Social alienation, phobias, slight OCD, relationship issues. I should probably try to do more to help myself really but I don't. Briefly tried antidepressants and counselling (I'd normally advise the latter but it only works if you drop your barriers). I have always been ashamed to admit it not that I judge people in the same situation.

When I came out of my darkest period of depression I was left rather confused, I had been so depressed and so full of self-loathing for so long that I no longer recognised myself. I almost missed my old self, such emotions had become part of my self identity.

Even now often feel like a pressure cylinder of suppressed neurotic energy, sometimes I just want to scream to let it out, but it's not my nature.

Still no one is entirely normal are they?
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
cjl
Posts: 1,073
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8/8/2010 12:14:09 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:10:22 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/7/2010 4:58:28 PM, brian_eggleston wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

There used to be a lot of stigma attached to mental health issues but as more and more famous and successful people reveal that they are receiving treatment for mental disorders, sufferers are becoming more understood and accepted.

1 in 4 people suffer from mental health problems - myself included - I take mild seditives to calm me down and I am also liable to bouts of depression, even though there is no reason for me to be unhappy (stress and depression are two sides of the same coin, by the way).

It's good to be honest and open about these things.

I've struggled with depression for many years, indeed it has slightly derailed my life. Or rather I allowed it to. I am over the worst of it but I still have certain issues that are manifesting. Social alienation, phobias, slight OCD, relationship issues. I should probably try to do more to help myself really but I don't. Briefly tried antidepressants and counselling (I'd normally advise the latter but it only works if you drop your barriers). I have always been ashamed to admit it not that I judge people in the same situation.

When I came out of my darkest period of depression I was left rather confused, I had been so depressed and so full of self-loathing for so long that I no longer recognised myself. I almost missed my old self, such emotions had become part of my self identity.

Even now often feel like a pressure cylinder of suppressed neurotic energy, sometimes I just want to scream to let it out, but it's not my nature.

Still no one is entirely normal are they?

Everyone is to different to be "normal".
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/8/2010 12:23:35 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
I don't think so. If you know what you're doing is insane than you have a choice. If you have a choice you're not truly insane.
However, someone psychotic may realise that what they are doing is wrong and still do it.
So I suppose it depends on the kind of psychiatric issue we're talking about.
Teaching schitzophrenics to recognise their hallucinations is step in the right direction.

This will most likely be TMI but to get my point across, you're going to have to deal with it. :P

I am considered "legally insane". That is when the government gives you a card and different rules than other citizens so if you are ever arrested, they will see the card and I will go straight to the looney-bin. Now, I do not eat babies or think I'm a faucet. Nor do I hallucinate and think Lincoln is sitting on my lap. (All three of these are real, just for other people I met in the hospital... 0_0) I have more than two mental disorders and each one is pretty damn strong.

Now, when I am not on medication, I do have delusions of me being invincible or that I can fly. I once thought my blood could cure cancer... Now, in the back of my mind, I knew this was crazy but my body did not respond to that logic since the part of my brain that was spewing the craziness was pretty much in control. Did I have a choice? Maybe, but when I did try to stop - it didn't work. They waited until I was hit by a bus when crossing the street (I was invincible, remember?) to then check my brain out. Luckily, little pills help me out now.

However, I am still "insane" even though I am coherent now and excelling in academics. "Insane" people who suffer from delusions stemming from Bi-polar like me can recognize there insane tendencies. Schizo people cannot, and instead live in their head, replaying their thoughts as reality. That is why they go through extensive therapy to learn normal behavior. Trust me, I have a lot of schizo friends.

Now, C_N is not delusional since he openly recognized the fallacy of his hopes in believing in a false religion. Nor is he insane.... He's just desperate and unhappy. Kind of sad to see... :( Anywhoo, insanity is very complicated and until you've been in a room with padded walls, it'll be hard to comprehend! :D

Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.

People don't understand 'madness' it is outside their frame of reference. As a result they will either react with fear or humour.

The person talking to themselves behind you on the bus is scary, because he is not behaving as you know he should. You can't predict their behaviour so you will start to worry about what they will do next. Maybe they will pull a knife on you.

If the insanity is distant from you it will get translated into silliness, i.e. Napoleon complex or wearing a fish on your head.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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8/8/2010 12:28:18 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:10:22 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/7/2010 4:58:28 PM, brian_eggleston wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

There used to be a lot of stigma attached to mental health issues but as more and more famous and successful people reveal that they are receiving treatment for mental disorders, sufferers are becoming more understood and accepted.

1 in 4 people suffer from mental health problems - myself included - I take mild seditives to calm me down and I am also liable to bouts of depression, even though there is no reason for me to be unhappy (stress and depression are two sides of the same coin, by the way).

It's good to be honest and open about these things.

I've struggled with depression for many years, indeed it has slightly derailed my life. Or rather I allowed it to. I am over the worst of it but I still have certain issues that are manifesting. Social alienation, phobias, slight OCD, relationship issues. I should probably try to do more to help myself really but I don't. Briefly tried antidepressants and counselling (I'd normally advise the latter but it only works if you drop your barriers). I have always been ashamed to admit it not that I judge people in the same situation.

When I came out of my darkest period of depression I was left rather confused, I had been so depressed and so full of self-loathing for so long that I no longer recognised myself. I almost missed my old self, such emotions had become part of my self identity.

Even now often feel like a pressure cylinder of suppressed neurotic energy, sometimes I just want to scream to let it out, but it's not my nature.

Still no one is entirely normal are they?

I'll refrain from being the therapist that I've been trained to be. But really, saying you have been depressed on a site like DDO where people are very judgmental is a big step. Believe me, I know what you're talking about with the social alienation or relationship issues. However, the fact that you have tried medication and therapy speaks a lot about your character. Many people who are ashamed of their disorders just try to ignore it, but thankfully you didn't.

When I was released from the hospital, I barely recognized myself. I didn't react the same way to things I had once enjoyed. My emotions were more unstable and I couldn't help people as much. I hated myself and wanted to be who I once was. Even though I knew I was unhappy during that time, it was at least more comfortable than who I had become. And that still hasn't changed even to this day. I'll probably always be filled with this regret of being mentally crippled. No matter how much I talk about it, even if I'm extremely open about everything, I'll always hate that part of me.

But here's one thing that did help me. A mental disorder, like recurring depression, is not the deciding factor of your personality. Being a happy person does not mean you have to be happy 100% of the time...or even 75%! By being yourself, and realizing your true self, that's the healthiest thing. If you can look in the mirror and not see yourself as depressed but as strong or intellectual or funny...anything other than depressed....it will help. It's about changing your perspective of the disorder and living with it. That didn't happen for me until I was diagnosed with something worse than a mental disorder but hopefully it can happen for you.

Remember that you have an awesome reputation on DDO and are known for being a determined intellectual. You obviously are a kind person! No one's normal (thankfully) but you are closer to being stable than others, believe me! Depression takes a lot out of you. It causes mental and physical strain... but talking about it can help. Just choose who you are open with... some people can be more detrimental than helpful. >.>
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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8/8/2010 12:36:06 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:23:35 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.

People don't understand 'madness' it is outside their frame of reference. As a result they will either react with fear or humour.

The person talking to themselves behind you on the bus is scary, because he is not behaving as you know he should. You can't predict their behaviour so you will start to worry about what they will do next. Maybe they will pull a knife on you.

If the insanity is distant from you it will get translated into silliness, i.e. Napoleon complex or wearing a fish on your head.

I hate it when people make fun of psychosis... the pain that they feel for going through such a disorder is incredible! My mother suffers from psychosis and growing up with someone like that can change your view about everything. It's not silly; it's sad. You don't know the true pain they feel until you've seen it; like seeing your mother in a straight-jacket, crying because she wants to hold her five year old daughter. How can psychosis be silly at all? To be trapped in your head, scared of reality...
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
brian_eggleston
Posts: 3,347
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8/8/2010 12:51:50 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:36:06 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:23:35 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.

People don't understand 'madness' it is outside their frame of reference. As a result they will either react with fear or humour.

The person talking to themselves behind you on the bus is scary, because he is not behaving as you know he should. You can't predict their behaviour so you will start to worry about what they will do next. Maybe they will pull a knife on you.

If the insanity is distant from you it will get translated into silliness, i.e. Napoleon complex or wearing a fish on your head.

I hate it when people make fun of psychosis... the pain that they feel for going through such a disorder is incredible! My mother suffers from psychosis and growing up with someone like that can change your view about everything. It's not silly; it's sad. You don't know the true pain they feel until you've seen it; like seeing your mother in a straight-jacket, crying because she wants to hold her five year old daughter. How can psychosis be silly at all? To be trapped in your head, scared of reality...

I have read all you have said on this forum and have concluded that you're, truly, a wonderful person.
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annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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8/8/2010 12:56:05 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:51:50 PM, brian_eggleston wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:36:06 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:23:35 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.

People don't understand 'madness' it is outside their frame of reference. As a result they will either react with fear or humour.

The person talking to themselves behind you on the bus is scary, because he is not behaving as you know he should. You can't predict their behaviour so you will start to worry about what they will do next. Maybe they will pull a knife on you.

If the insanity is distant from you it will get translated into silliness, i.e. Napoleon complex or wearing a fish on your head.

I hate it when people make fun of psychosis... the pain that they feel for going through such a disorder is incredible! My mother suffers from psychosis and growing up with someone like that can change your view about everything. It's not silly; it's sad. You don't know the true pain they feel until you've seen it; like seeing your mother in a straight-jacket, crying because she wants to hold her five year old daughter. How can psychosis be silly at all? To be trapped in your head, scared of reality...

I have read all you have said on this forum and have concluded that you're, truly, a wonderful person.

Thank you! I don't know why you think that though. I'm the same as anyone else on the site!
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/8/2010 1:00:17 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:28:18 PM, annhasle wrote:

I'll refrain from being the therapist that I've been trained to be. But really, saying you have been depressed on a site like DDO where people are very judgmental is a big step.

I am anonymous here so that helps.

Believe me, I know what you're talking about with the social alienation or relationship issues. However, the fact that you have tried medication and therapy speaks a lot about your character. Many people who are ashamed of their disorders just try to ignore it, but thankfully you didn't.

I've paid quite a steep price for my issues in terms of education, job prospects, friends, girlfriends. So that really forced the issue, not as far as it should my efforts have been very limited.

When I was released from the hospital, I barely recognized myself. I didn't react the same way to things I had once enjoyed. My emotions were more unstable and I couldn't help people as much. I hated myself and wanted to be who I once was. Even though I knew I was unhappy during that time, it was at least more comfortable than who I had become. And that still hasn't changed even to this day. I'll probably always be filled with this regret of being mentally crippled. No matter how much I talk about it, even if I'm extremely open about everything, I'll always hate that part of me.

My gut instinct tells me that those feelings will reduce with time, how much time I don't know. I'd also wager that your experiences have given you so much more wisdom, insight and appreciation for life than you would otherwise have. So though you will probably never welcome that part of you, it may have very well given you a lot of positives and it is to that you will be reconciled. (Just speculating here).


But here's one thing that did help me. A mental disorder, like recurring depression, is not the deciding factor of your personality. Being a happy person does not mean you have to be happy 100% of the time...or even 75%! By being yourself, and realizing your true self, that's the healthiest thing. If you can look in the mirror and not see yourself as depressed but as strong or intellectual or funny...anything other than depressed....it will help. It's about changing your perspective of the disorder and living with it. That didn't happen for me until I was diagnosed with something worse than a mental disorder but hopefully it can happen for you.

Remember that you have an awesome reputation on DDO and are known for being a determined intellectual. You obviously are a kind person! No one's normal (thankfully) but you are closer to being stable than others, believe me! Depression takes a lot out of you. It causes mental and physical strain... but talking about it can help. Just choose who you are open with... some people can be more detrimental than helpful. >.>

Wow thanks!
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/8/2010 1:04:00 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:36:06 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:23:35 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.

People don't understand 'madness' it is outside their frame of reference. As a result they will either react with fear or humour.

The person talking to themselves behind you on the bus is scary, because he is not behaving as you know he should. You can't predict their behaviour so you will start to worry about what they will do next. Maybe they will pull a knife on you.

If the insanity is distant from you it will get translated into silliness, i.e. Napoleon complex or wearing a fish on your head.

I hate it when people make fun of psychosis... the pain that they feel for going through such a disorder is incredible! My mother suffers from psychosis and growing up with someone like that can change your view about everything. It's not silly; it's sad. You don't know the true pain they feel until you've seen it; like seeing your mother in a straight-jacket, crying because she wants to hold her five year old daughter. How can psychosis be silly at all? To be trapped in your head, scared of reality...

I understand what you mean, but I think it is a normal human reaction.

Terrorism provokes fear and humour, so does paedophilia, death... in fact anything that we have great difficulty coming to terms with.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
brian_eggleston
Posts: 3,347
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8/8/2010 1:07:01 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/8/2010 12:56:05 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:51:50 PM, brian_eggleston wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:36:06 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 12:23:35 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:24:39 AM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/8/2010 11:13:42 AM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 8/7/2010 3:16:09 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 8/6/2010 5:27:18 PM, TulleKrazy wrote:
At 7/14/2010 12:16:30 PM, annhasle wrote:
At 7/13/2010 4:12:49 AM, tvellalott wrote:
Sorry if I'm prying too much and you don't have to answer, but I'm a bit confused. They give you a card labelling you "insane" for having bipolar disorder? That's kind of effed up...

It's law that if you have more than one disorder and especially if one can give you delusions (like bi-polar does), that you must be given a card labeling you insane. Is it degrading? Yes. Do I like it? No. But I'm open about all of this, so don't worry about prying. I ignore people's taunts and would like people to be educated about mental disorders since they are very common but not understood by the general public.

Let me explain a little more. When the US government went through my file years ago when I was declared to have three disorders, they sent a man who evaluated my "sanity". He was a giant prick and extremely rude (he called me a crazy cunt when I said I didn't want to talk to him! I was 9!). Anyways, since Manic Depression, Manic Bi-polar and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are all extremely strong disorders, I have to be heavily medicated and in therapy. So, I have had a little card in my wallet since I was 9 saying "INSANE".

However, my family history and past was also critically analyzed. My mother was in a psychiatric hospital for thirteen years and then in prison until I was 10 so that didn't help at all. Also, I had been through some....traumatic events, so I was already predisposed to insanity they said. I still think it's effed up too but I don't want to be like my mother so I'm careful and do what I have to, whether it be meds or therapy. It's life, you know? You just take it a day at a time. :D

Wow, I guess things work differently in the United States. As far as I know, we don't label people "insane" for their disorders (in the field of Psychology). Of course, there is definitely a stigma of mental disorders in the general population, even amongst those who have them (eg. people who have mood disorders think those with psychosis are "crazy", etc etc) and I think that is a shame. Mental illness is far more common than people think it is, simply because many people go undiagnosed.

There's stigmas if you are diagnosed. And their's dire consequences if you aren't. Every day I talk to youth my age who are suicidal, and most of them suffer from fear of medication. That they'd be "confessing their insanity and inability to take care of themselves". And when I go to schools to educate adults and kids about mental disorders, they never understand the severity. Many people may suffer from bouts of depression, since it is very common. But the stronger ones like psychosis are made fun of... and I have never understood why.

People don't understand 'madness' it is outside their frame of reference. As a result they will either react with fear or humour.

The person talking to themselves behind you on the bus is scary, because he is not behaving as you know he should. You can't predict their behaviour so you will start to worry about what they will do next. Maybe they will pull a knife on you.

If the insanity is distant from you it will get translated into silliness, i.e. Napoleon complex or wearing a fish on your head.

I hate it when people make fun of psychosis... the pain that they feel for going through such a disorder is incredible! My mother suffers from psychosis and growing up with someone like that can change your view about everything. It's not silly; it's sad. You don't know the true pain they feel until you've seen it; like seeing your mother in a straight-jacket, crying because she wants to hold her five year old daughter. How can psychosis be silly at all? To be trapped in your head, scared of reality...

I have read all you have said on this forum and have concluded that you're, truly, a wonderful person.

Thank you! I don't know why you think that though. I'm the same as anyone else on the site!

No, you have had a far more bitter experience than most, and yet you have managed to rise above it to such an extent that you are able (and willing) to help others...you clearly have a very strong personality and are able to inspire others – for the good.

Certainly, your words have helped me by putting my problems into perspective.

Thank you.
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