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Exaggeration of mental health in the media

missbailey8
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7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...
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Vaarka
Posts: 7,566
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7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.
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PetersSmith
Posts: 5,821
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7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.
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