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Exaggeration of mental health in the media

missbailey8
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7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...
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Vaarka
Posts: 9,232
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7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.
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PetersSmith
Posts: 6,216
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7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.
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Doublestemcell
Posts: 5
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12/26/2016 8:16:30 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
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Welfare-Worker
Posts: 1,537
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12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.
GrimlyF
Posts: 376
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12/27/2016 12:27:27 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.

In England the primary cause of an inability to work is " Stress ".
Welfare-Worker
Posts: 1,537
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12/27/2016 2:52:59 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 12/27/2016 12:27:27 PM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.

In England the primary cause of an inability to work is " Stress ".

Yeah.
For food stamps if you quit a job you have to have 'good cause'.
One young man quit a job at a burger flip because it was too stressful. No problem.

I had a guy on my caseload that was exempted from work for E.D.
Yeah.
He claimed bi-polar, got free meds for that, but a side effect was erectile dysfunction.
The program he was on had very lax disability requirements, just a note from a doctor.
He provided that, I ran it past my supervisor, exempted from work another 12 months.
GrimlyF
Posts: 376
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12/28/2016 2:11:55 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 12/27/2016 2:52:59 PM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 12/27/2016 12:27:27 PM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.

In England the primary cause of an inability to work is " Stress ".

Yeah.
For food stamps if you quit a job you have to have 'good cause'.
One young man quit a job at a burger flip because it was too stressful. No problem.

I had a guy on my caseload that was exempted from work for E.D.
Yeah.
He claimed bi-polar, got free meds for that, but a side effect was erectile dysfunction.
The program he was on had very lax disability requirements, just a note from a doctor.
He provided that, I ran it past my supervisor, exempted from work another 12 months.

Mental dysfunction is the new common cold of excuses. Nothing that needs a real examination by a therapist but just enough to get you a paid holiday.
Hiu
Posts: 1,464
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1/1/2017 1:03:14 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 12/28/2016 2:11:55 AM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 2:52:59 PM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 12/27/2016 12:27:27 PM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.

In England the primary cause of an inability to work is " Stress ".

Yeah.
For food stamps if you quit a job you have to have 'good cause'.
One young man quit a job at a burger flip because it was too stressful. No problem.

I had a guy on my caseload that was exempted from work for E.D.
Yeah.
He claimed bi-polar, got free meds for that, but a side effect was erectile dysfunction.
The program he was on had very lax disability requirements, just a note from a doctor.
He provided that, I ran it past my supervisor, exempted from work another 12 months.

Mental dysfunction is the new common cold of excuses. Nothing that needs a real examination by a therapist but just enough to get you a paid holiday.

Interesting...I'm an emergency department social worker, I'm so much interested in how you forumulated this from a medical/scientific perspective.
GrimlyF
Posts: 376
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1/1/2017 9:15:15 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 1/1/2017 1:03:14 AM, Hiu wrote:
At 12/28/2016 2:11:55 AM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 2:52:59 PM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 12/27/2016 12:27:27 PM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.

In England the primary cause of an inability to work is " Stress ".

Yeah.
For food stamps if you quit a job you have to have 'good cause'.
One young man quit a job at a burger flip because it was too stressful. No problem.

I had a guy on my caseload that was exempted from work for E.D.
Yeah.
He claimed bi-polar, got free meds for that, but a side effect was erectile dysfunction.
The program he was on had very lax disability requirements, just a note from a doctor.
He provided that, I ran it past my supervisor, exempted from work another 12 months.

Mental dysfunction is the new common cold of excuses. Nothing that needs a real examination by a therapist but just enough to get you a paid holiday.

Interesting...I'm an emergency department social worker, I'm so much interested in how you forumulated this from a medical/scientific perspective.

I am English so my " perspective " may differ from your own. I also draw my " perspective " from people who are not subject to the tender ministrations of a hospital system. Also I worked in the real world not the confines of a medical ward and the people I observed I did so on a daily basis over years not days.
Medical: In every single case I never,ever, saw a medical certificate citing stress or depression used by a man. If I made a few discreet enquiries I would learn the womans husbands were on their firms annual holiday. It is far easier to get a 2wk sicknote from a G.P. by claiming the kids are playing up, the mortgage is unpaid and your aunty is sick and you JUST CAN'T COPE. Voila! 2wks paid leave. As I said I knew these women and we would swap badinage almost daily and then, over no time at all they are suddenly weighed down by the world. The real clincher was that they never needed 2 sicknotes. I often wondered how the G.Ps. knew how long the stress would last.

Scientific. You don't need science to see the trend. All during the summer and especially the days before Christmas it is blatantly obvious.
Hiu
Posts: 1,464
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1/2/2017 1:50:33 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 1/1/2017 9:15:15 AM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 1/1/2017 1:03:14 AM, Hiu wrote:
At 12/28/2016 2:11:55 AM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 2:52:59 PM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 12/27/2016 12:27:27 PM, GrimlyF wrote:
At 12/27/2016 4:33:59 AM, Welfare-Worker wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:23:16 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 7/30/2016 8:02:23 PM, Vaarka wrote:
At 7/30/2016 11:23:21 AM, missbailey8 wrote:
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) about one in four people around the world will be affected by mental illness in their lifetime. [1] To this day, the stigma of mental health is incredibly detrimental, but that's not entirely what I'm going to discuss here today. I want to discuss the media's portrayal of mental health and why it's damaging.

In the media, there are plenty of examples of characters with mental disorders, but ask yourself this: how many of them are realistic? In television, movies, or other media outlets, the main goal is entertainment. In my opinion, "entertainment" can qualify as showing cheap, over-the-top scenarios of mental illness.

Here's one example:

"A man who suffers from schizophrenia goes on a shooting spree in Times Square and later stabs a pregnant physician in the stomach. These are the opening scenes from Wonderland, a drama set in the psychiatric and emergency room units of a New York City hospital." [2]

The same article also says that most people get their knowledge of mental health from the media, whether it be the news, television, or movies.

Is this really the message that should be sent to the public about mental illness? Blatant stereotypes about those with serious mental disorders only draws the hypothetical line between those who are "healthy" and those who are "sick". Perpetuating these outrageous myths is harmful to those suffering and those gaining this false information. Romanization of mental illness isn't going to stop the large stigma already associated with it.

Why try to separate those based on their mental health or possible disorders when we can treat everyone equally? A disorder is not a character trait or special quirk. Mental health is a serious issue that should be treated with respect and not blown out of proportion by the media.

Citations
[1]http://www.who.int...
[2]http://psychcentral.com...

This reminds me of the new idea revolving around how mental disabilities are becoming more common. In reality, we've just developed new ways to identify those mental problems. Also, the whole "I won't let them giver my baby shots because it might become autistic" thing comes into mind.

Actually the theory that mental disorders becoming more common is because of society's switch from the industrial sector to the service sector, where physical pain has now been replaced with mental pain.

In the 70's the primary disability claim by welfare recipients was "bad back".
By the 90's that was replaced by "bi-polar", even for school age children.
When AFDC ended, there was a flood of approvals for childhood disabilities for mental issues. Not all bi-polar, many were learning disabilities.

In England the primary cause of an inability to work is " Stress ".

Yeah.
For food stamps if you quit a job you have to have 'good cause'.
One young man quit a job at a burger flip because it was too stressful. No problem.

I had a guy on my caseload that was exempted from work for E.D.
Yeah.
He claimed bi-polar, got free meds for that, but a side effect was erectile dysfunction.
The program he was on had very lax disability requirements, just a note from a doctor.
He provided that, I ran it past my supervisor, exempted from work another 12 months.

Mental dysfunction is the new common cold of excuses. Nothing that needs a real examination by a therapist but just enough to get you a paid holiday.

Interesting...I'm an emergency department social worker, I'm so much interested in how you forumulated this from a medical/scientific perspective.

I am English so my " perspective " may differ from your own. I also draw my " perspective " from people who are not subject to the tender ministrations of a hospital system. Also I worked in the real world not the confines of a medical ward and the people I observed I did so on a daily basis over years not days.
Medical: In every single case I never,ever, saw a medical certificate citing stress or depression used by a man. If I made a few discreet enquiries I would learn the womans husbands were on their firms annual holiday. It is far easier to get a 2wk sicknote from a G.P. by claiming the kids are playing up, the mortgage is unpaid and your aunty is sick and you JUST CAN'T COPE. Voila! 2wks paid leave. As I said I knew these women and we would swap badinage almost daily and then, over no time at all they are suddenly weighed down by the world. The real clincher was that they never needed 2 sicknotes. I often wondered how the G.Ps. knew how long the stress would last.

Scientific. You don't need science to see the trend. All during the summer and especially the days before Christmas it is blatantly obvious.

I'm American, so I do not understand why you needed to indicate you being English in your above response towards me, but anywho.....

You said:

"Also I worked in the real world not the confines of a medical ward.."

And I do not live in the real world even though for 12 hours a day I am confined in a "hospital ward?" I live in the world as much as you do.

You said:

"t is far easier to get a 2wk sicknote from a G.P. by claiming the kids are playing up, the mortgage is unpaid and your aunty is sick and you JUST CAN'T COPE. Voila! 2wks paid leave. As I said I knew these women and we would swap badinage almost daily and then, over no time at all they are suddenly weighed down by the world. The real clincher was that they never needed 2 sicknotes. I often wondered how the G.Ps. knew how long the stress would last."

The equivalency of what you said in the above is no different than someone taking two weeks off from work and coming back with a doctor's note stating they're ill. Or some lazy person taking stress leave off of work. There will always be people who take advantage of the system. I see this with the homeless population here. When winter comes, many check themselves in the emergency room with auditory hallucinations or claim suicidal/homicidal ideation. As I do my assessments I know some are full of it (because many of them are frequent flyers), but because we cannot take chances especially if they admit to wanting to harm themselves we must take their words very seriously.

That is the nature of the beast in the human condition. Humans will take advantage if they know they will gain something but that doesn't mean mental health is not a problem in the world.
Philocat
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1/27/2017 10:54:01 PM
Posted: 3 weeks ago
It seems to me that the rise in mental health problems stems from existential crisiis amongst the increasingly materialistic and nihilistic citizens of modern society.

Kierkegaard realised that without existential meaning in one's life, despair is inevitable. After all, if there is no reason to live, why live? Such a mentality is remarkably common amongst those with mental health problems.

This is of course not the only valid explanation for the rise, many interesting ones have been posted in this thread. But I think a distinct lack of existential meaning in many peoples' lives is bound to contribute.
Unterseeboot
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2/4/2017 11:56:39 PM
Posted: 2 weeks ago
I can truly attest that the media does not exaggerated the harmful and even deadly results of mentally ill people in our country. As a first responder I see the results of that almost daily. Just two days ago we responded to the call for an 80 year old man who was shot in the face by his bipolar son. This was just before the kid set his parents house on fire.

If anything the media's efficiency in reporting the impact of mentally ill violent people is woefully incomplete.

I'll be happy to answer any questions on the mentally ill and crime of violence, or the repudcussions of it. As an EMT who is also in the process of earning his degree in psychology, it's sort of my Ballywick! LOL.