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Nazism question -- why the north/south divide

Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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11/29/2013 11:34:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
In northern Germany, public opinion was strongly against the regime. There was a KKK reaction to the regime. "Those savage Krauts." The prime minister of Germany, who was born in what used to be Prussia, called Hitler a "bohemian Kraut." The word "Kraut" was never meant to refer to all Germans but rather the ones from southern Germany, Austria. In the south, public opinion was in favor of Hitler. Why the divide, why not the whole country?
Seeginomikata
Posts: 5
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1/19/2014 1:41:23 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 11/29/2013 11:34:43 AM, Adam2 wrote:
In northern Germany, public opinion was strongly against the regime. There was a KKK reaction to the regime. "Those savage Krauts." The prime minister of Germany, who was born in what used to be Prussia, called Hitler a "bohemian Kraut." The word "Kraut" was never meant to refer to all Germans but rather the ones from southern Germany, Austria. In the south, public opinion was in favor of Hitler. Why the divide, why not the whole country?

Up until event today, there has always been a cultural, linguistic and political divide between South Germans and North Germans. North Germans and South Germans may all be "German", but they are culturally different enough and can all easily tell each other apart by just they way they speak. It's kind of like the difference between Dixie Southerners and Yankee Northerners in the USA. Politically, North Germans were primarily influenced by Prussians, while South Germans were influenced by Austrians. The rivalry between the Austria-leaning south and the prussian-leaning north is still evident in present day political boundaries. Prussian-formed Germany does not include Austria, even though Austrians are, by nationality, very much German.

Hitler was a South German (from Austria), and his major base of support was in Bavaria, in the south. His plan re-unifying Austria with the rest of Germany in the Anschluss was very popular with south germans, not so much with north germans.
eNo
Posts: 80
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1/19/2014 8:14:52 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 11/29/2013 11:34:43 AM, Adam2 wrote:
In northern Germany, public opinion was strongly against the regime. There was a KKK reaction to the regime. "Those savage Krauts." The prime minister of Germany, who was born in what used to be Prussia, called Hitler a "bohemian Kraut." The word "Kraut" was never meant to refer to all Germans but rather the ones from southern Germany, Austria. In the south, public opinion was in favor of Hitler. Why the divide, why not the whole country?

Well, your questions really requires a very long post walking you through a long and very interesting history of the area dating back to the Holy Roman empire... which would have you scrolling... and scrolling... and scrolling....

However, in the interest of time and effort I will through a blanket over German history and describe it as briefly and generally as I can...

Northern Germany: Prussian Military tradition, bourgeoisie, Maritime tradition, Center of Politics tradition.

Southern Germany: Industrial, Manufacturing, The Working Man, Blue Collar, Common Food, Unions.

Hitler was more popular in the south because he was... A. From the region. B. Portrayed himself, and the party, as the common man.
"Scholarly opinion, even well informed scholarly opinion, is not evidence."
rdx
Posts: 3
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2/2/2014 4:19:18 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/19/2014 8:14:52 AM, eNo wrote:
At 11/29/2013 11:34:43 AM, Adam2 wrote:
In northern Germany, public opinion was strongly against the regime.

At all, the Germans fear communist. Hitler was an admirer of Mussolini who takes the power in Italy in 1922 he takes the power in Germany in 1933. In 1930 Italy was admired in Germany: no strikes, order, military strength, that situation favored the Nazi. No serious resistance was ever in Germany against the nazi party unlike in Italy.