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Most exciting moment in Cold War?

suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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12/23/2013 2:42:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Well, I didn't live through that period but I guest noting would beet watching Able Archer on TV with popcorn in hands. Everybody agree?

D
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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12/23/2013 7:24:10 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/23/2013 2:42:30 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
Well, I didn't live through that period but I guest noting would beet watching Able Archer on TV with popcorn in hands. Everybody agree?

D

lol, I didn't even know about this event.

Regardless, I would say the Cuban missile crisis easily trumps it in significance. That was NOT an exercise. The CMC coined the term "mutually assured destruction", i.e. before then, nuclear war was still seen as a viable, containable means of limited warfare.

Then there's the Berlin airlift as well...although that's probably not as significant.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
ararmer1919
Posts: 362
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12/23/2013 9:01:41 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/23/2013 7:24:10 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 12/23/2013 2:42:30 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
Well, I didn't live through that period but I guest noting would beet watching Able Archer on TV with popcorn in hands. Everybody agree?

D

lol, I didn't even know about this event.

Regardless, I would say the Cuban missile crisis easily trumps it in significance. That was NOT an exercise. The CMC coined the term "mutually assured destruction", i.e. before then, nuclear war was still seen as a viable, containable means of limited warfare.

Then there's the Berlin airlift as well...although that's probably not as significant.

Definitely the CMC
Bullish
Posts: 3,527
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12/23/2013 3:49:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
It's when the Russians successfully launched Sputnik. I never fail to appreciate the glory of the Siberian Motherland.
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suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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12/24/2013 1:45:03 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/23/2013 3:49:33 PM, Bullish wrote:
It's when the Russians successfully launched Sputnik. I never fail to appreciate the glory of the Siberian Motherland.

Sputnik launching is certainly a breathtaking moment. I bet it's even better when the first astronaut was launch to space and survive.

I take it that you're Russian?
Bullish
Posts: 3,527
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12/24/2013 1:55:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/24/2013 1:45:03 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
At 12/23/2013 3:49:33 PM, Bullish wrote:
It's when the Russians successfully launched Sputnik. I never fail to appreciate the glory of the Siberian Motherland.

Sputnik launching is certainly a breathtaking moment. I bet it's even better when the first astronaut was launch to space and survive.

I take it that you're Russian?

I care more about orbit technology than putting humans in space, because satellites can be weaponized.

Prefer to keep my ethnicity private.
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suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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12/25/2013 5:02:34 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/24/2013 1:55:33 PM, Bullish wrote:
At 12/24/2013 1:45:03 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
At 12/23/2013 3:49:33 PM, Bullish wrote:
It's when the Russians successfully launched Sputnik. I never fail to appreciate the glory of the Siberian Motherland.

Sputnik launching is certainly a breathtaking moment. I bet it's even better when the first astronaut was launch to space and survive.

I take it that you're Russian?

I care more about orbit technology than putting humans in space, because satellites can be weaponized.

Prefer to keep my ethnicity private.

Understood. I didn't mean to ask for your race though.

So at the time that satellites had been launched in the USSR, the government had a very clear intention of using it as weapon?
PatriotPerson
Posts: 1,062
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12/25/2013 11:32:15 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Cuban Missile Crisis.
"Victory has a thousand fathers, but defeat is an orphan" -JFK
"You all stink like poo poo" - Rich Davis
"That idea may just be crazy enough... TO GET US ALL KILLED!" -Squidward Tentacles
"My heart is always breaking for the ghosts that haunt this room." -Nate Ruess
STALIN
Posts: 3,726
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1/5/2014 4:23:11 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/23/2013 7:24:10 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 12/23/2013 2:42:30 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
Well, I didn't live through that period but I guest noting would beet watching Able Archer on TV with popcorn in hands. Everybody agree?

D

lol, I didn't even know about this event.

Regardless, I would say the Cuban missile crisis easily trumps it in significance. That was NOT an exercise. The CMC coined the term "mutually assured destruction", i.e. before then, nuclear war was still seen as a viable, containable means of limited warfare.

Then there's the Berlin airlift as well...although that's probably not as significant.

I agree with that. The Cuban missile crisis was probably the climax of the Cold War. It was probably the most exciting moment because it almost started another world war.
kawaii_crazy
Posts: 580
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1/5/2014 5:27:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/25/2013 11:32:15 AM, PatriotPerson wrote:
Cuban Missile Crisis.
"Being called weird is like being called Limited Edition. Meaning you're something people don't see that often." -Ashley Purdy

Please help raise money for a Christmas gift for airmax (although he is Jewish, as YYW pointed out). He is in desperate need of a new laptop, and he has done so much for this site; he certainly deserves one. :)
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Oromagi
Posts: 857
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1/23/2014 1:28:04 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Most exciting moment during the Cuban Missile Crisis?

From Wikipedia:

On 27 October 1962, during the Cuban Missile Crisis, a group of eleven United States Navy destroyers and the aircraft carrier USS Randolph located the diesel-powered nuclear-armed Soviet Foxtrot-class submarine B-59 near Cuba. Despite being in international waters, the Americans started dropping practice depth charges, explosives intended to force the submarine to come to the surface for identification. There had been no contact from Moscow for a number of days and, although the submarine's crew had earlier been picking up U.S. civilian radio broadcasts, once B-59 began attempting to hide from its U.S. Navy pursuers, it was too deep to monitor any radio traffic, so those on board did not know whether war had broken out.[5] The captain of the submarine, Valentin Grigorievitch Savitsky, believing that a war might already have started, wanted to launch a nuclear torpedo.[6]

Three officers on board the submarine " Savitsky, the political officer Ivan Semonovich Maslennikov, and the second-in-command Arkhipov " were authorized to launch the torpedo if agreeing unanimously in favor of doing so. An argument broke out among the three, in which only Arkhipov was against the launch.[7] Although Arkhipov was only second-in-command of submarine B-59, he was actually commander of the flotilla of submarines, including B-4, B-36 and B-130, and of equal rank to Captain Savitsky. According to author Edward Wilson, the reputation Arkhipov gained from his courageous conduct in the previous year's K-19 incident also helped him prevail in the debate.[3] Arkhipov eventually persuaded Savitsky to surface the submarine and await orders from Moscow. This presumably averted the nuclear warfare which could possibly have ensued had the torpedo been fired.[8] The submarine's batteries had run very low and the air-conditioning had failed, so it was forced to surface amidst its U.S. pursuers and head home.[9] Washington's message that practice depth charges were being used to signal the submarines to surface never reached B-59, and Moscow claims it has no record of receiving it either.
Oromagi
Posts: 857
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1/23/2014 1:32:45 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I'd never heard of this event until I toured the Titan Missile Museum south of Tuscon:

Keep in mind that Russian Satellites monitored Titan missile launch bay doors, so when a door blows off and a warhead flies 100 ft through the air, it must have set off some pretty panicky moments in Moscow.

Titan II Missile Explosion

The Titan II Launch Complex 374-7 in Southside (Van Buren County), just north of Damascus (Van Buren and Faulkner counties), became the site of the most highly publicized disaster in the history of the Titan II missile program when its missile exploded within the launch duct on September 19, 1980. An Air Force airman was killed, and the complex was destroyed. The Titan II Missile Launch Complex 374-7 Site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on February 18, 2000.

Complex 374-7 had already been the site of one significant accident on January 27, 1978, when an oxidizer leak sent a cloud of toxic fumes 3,000 feet long, 300 feet wide, and 100 feet high drifting across U.S. Highway 65. Civilians were evacuated from the area, and four people suffered some ill effects from contact with the vapors. The leak was quickly repaired.

On September 18, 1980, at about 6:30 p.m., an airman conducting maintenance on the Titan II missile dropped a wrench socket, which fell about eighty feet before hitting and piercing the skin on the rocket"s first-stage fuel tank, causing it to leak. The commander of the 308th Strategic Missile Wing quickly formed a potential-hazard team, and by 9:00 p.m., the Air Force personnel manning the site were evacuated. About one hour later, Air Force security police began evacuating nearby civilian residents as efforts continued to determine the status of the missile and the fuel leak.

Senior Airman David Livingston and Sergeant Jeff K. Kennedy entered the launch complex early on the morning of September 19 to get readings of airborne fuel concentrations, which they found to be at their maximum. At about 3:00 a.m., the two men returned to the surface to await further instructions. Just as they sat down on the concrete edge of the access portal, the missile exploded, blowing the 740-ton launch duct closure door 200 feet into the air and some 600 feet northeast of the launch complex. The W-53 nuclear warhead landed about 100 feet from the launch complex"s entry gate; its safety features operated correctly and prevented any loss of radioactive material. Kennedy, his leg broken, was blown 150 feet from the silo. Livingston lay amid the rubble of the launch duct for some time before security personnel located and evacuated him. Livingston died of his injuries that day. Twenty-one people were injured by the explosion or during rescue efforts.

In early October 1980, cleanup operations gathered tons of debris from around 400 acres surrounding the launch complex and pumped some 100,000 gallons of contaminated water from the silo. The total cost to replace Launch Complex 374-7 was estimated at $225,322,670, while demolition and cleanup were expected to cost $20,000,000. Ultimately, the Air Force decided to seal the complex with soil, gravel, and small concrete debris.

A congressional inquiry into the accident found the Titan II missile program to be essentially reliable. It recommended, however, improved communications between the Air Force and local officials in case of accidents and a modification of the Air Force"s policy of neither confirming nor denying the presence and condition of nuclear weapons at an accident site.

Six Air Force servicemen, including Livingston and Kennedy, were awarded Airman"s Medals for Heroism for their actions on September 19, 1980, and the Titan II maintenance structure at Little Rock Air Force Base was later designated the Livingston Building in honor of Livingston.
For additional information:
Cold War Resources Associated with the 308th Strategic Missile Wing in Arkansas Multiple-Property Submission Historic Context. On file at Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, Little Rock, Arkansas.

Schlosser, Eric. Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety. New York: Penguin, 2013.
Grandbudda
Posts: 16
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1/23/2014 12:51:29 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I was 8 years old during the Cuban Missile Crisis and I can tell you that at the time it was a frightening experience. The whole country was glued to news reports probably for the first time wondering when we would hear we were at nuclear war. When President Kennedy spoke to the nation a lot of people thought we had just days to live.