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Make up Your Own Civilization

bubbatheclown
Posts: 1,258
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1/17/2014 6:19:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Rules:
1. The civilization must be located here on Earth, and its location must be included.
2. Give that civilization a time period of its conception, and include its history.
3. If they lived in the past, please do not make them incredibly advanced for their time.
4. If they have an empire, please do not make them conquerors of the world.
5. Try to make it as realistic as you can.
6. Try not to make their territory overlap with another civilization that existed in that area at that time, but if this is too hard you can do so anyway. If they're nomadic, territory doesn't matter, but still include where they are.

Feel free to give them their own culture, their own name, their history, how they lived, their religion (either a real one or a religion you make up) and whatever else you think of. But try not to turn this forum into a huge dictionary of this civilization's fictional language. You can post a few words in their made up language, but don't go overboard on the civilization's language.

If your made up civilization is bizarre, feel free to post it anyway, as long as it's not outright stupid.
MysticEgg
Posts: 524
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1/17/2014 6:41:40 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/17/2014 6:19:24 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
Rules:
1. The civilization must be located here on Earth, and its location must be included.
2. Give that civilization a time period of its conception, and include its history.
3. If they lived in the past, please do not make them incredibly advanced for their time.
4. If they have an empire, please do not make them conquerors of the world.
5. Try to make it as realistic as you can.
6. Try not to make their territory overlap with another civilization that existed in that area at that time, but if this is too hard you can do so anyway. If they're nomadic, territory doesn't matter, but still include where they are.

Feel free to give them their own culture, their own name, their history, how they lived, their religion (either a real one or a religion you make up) and whatever else you think of. But try not to turn this forum into a huge dictionary of this civilization's fictional language. You can post a few words in their made up language, but don't go overboard on the civilization's language.

If your made up civilization is bizarre, feel free to post it anyway, as long as it's not outright stupid.

Damn. Languages are my speciality.

(R'on'uift hiza Domm jaet't.) One I made up just for this thread.

R' is the prefix used for 1st person singular, placed onto the verb, which will stay in the infinitive. The verb I used was "uift"; this means "to see, to watch, to regard". "on'" is another prefix, that turns a verb reflexive. That is, "R'uift" = I see (to see is used here), but "R'on'uift" is "I see myself".

Next, we have "hiza", which means "your". There are no genders in my on-the-spot language, but there is a singular/plural agreement. However, since "Domm" = string (but also forum) is singular, then "hiza" doesn't become inflected. So:

R'on'uift hiza Domm = I see myself your forum [...] So far, so good.

Next we come to "jaet't". "jaet" is the verb "to love" or "to burn", and the 't is a suffix indicating a present participle. (This doesn't affect the pronunciation, however.) So, "love" to "loving."

But why does the second verb get booted to the end of the sentence? Because, in my on-the-spot-language, a reflexive article will send the other verb to the end of the clause.

Therefore: "R'on'uift hiza Domm jaet't" transliterates into: "I myself see your string loving", but translates into "I see myself loving your forum."

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is the most roundabout way to compliment someone in the history of mankind.

Thank you, and goodnight!
bubbatheclown
Posts: 1,258
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1/17/2014 7:06:58 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/17/2014 6:41:40 PM, MysticEgg wrote:
At 1/17/2014 6:19:24 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
Rules:
1. The civilization must be located here on Earth, and its location must be included.
2. Give that civilization a time period of its conception, and include its history.
3. If they lived in the past, please do not make them incredibly advanced for their time.
4. If they have an empire, please do not make them conquerors of the world.
5. Try to make it as realistic as you can.
6. Try not to make their territory overlap with another civilization that existed in that area at that time, but if this is too hard you can do so anyway. If they're nomadic, territory doesn't matter, but still include where they are.

Feel free to give them their own culture, their own name, their history, how they lived, their religion (either a real one or a religion you make up) and whatever else you think of. But try not to turn this forum into a huge dictionary of this civilization's fictional language. You can post a few words in their made up language, but don't go overboard on the civilization's language.

If your made up civilization is bizarre, feel free to post it anyway, as long as it's not outright stupid.


Damn. Languages are my speciality.

(R'on'uift hiza Domm jaet't.) One I made up just for this thread.

R' is the prefix used for 1st person singular, placed onto the verb, which will stay in the infinitive. The verb I used was "uift"; this means "to see, to watch, to regard". "on'" is another prefix, that turns a verb reflexive. That is, "R'uift" = I see (to see is used here), but "R'on'uift" is "I see myself".

Next, we have "hiza", which means "your". There are no genders in my on-the-spot language, but there is a singular/plural agreement. However, since "Domm" = string (but also forum) is singular, then "hiza" doesn't become inflected. So:

R'on'uift hiza Domm = I see myself your forum [...] So far, so good.

Next we come to "jaet't". "jaet" is the verb "to love" or "to burn", and the 't is a suffix indicating a present participle. (This doesn't affect the pronunciation, however.) So, "love" to "loving."

But why does the second verb get booted to the end of the sentence? Because, in my on-the-spot-language, a reflexive article will send the other verb to the end of the clause.

Therefore: "R'on'uift hiza Domm jaet't" transliterates into: "I myself see your string loving", but translates into "I see myself loving your forum."

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is the most roundabout way to compliment someone in the history of mankind.

Thank you, and goodnight!

That was quite impressive, MysticEgg. I didn't say you couldn't post your made up language. I was simply saying don't go overboard with it. After all, there has to be a civilization that uses the language.
bubbatheclown
Posts: 1,258
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1/17/2014 7:31:50 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Keshlag Part I: Background

In 1716 B.C. a group of Canaanites following their religious leader founded the city of Keshlag in what is today Israel. The residents of this city were then on known as Keshlagites.

Their city, unlike any city in history, had no gate. If you wanted to get inside of the city from the outside, you had to call out to the walls and have somebody throw you a rope that they and a whole bunch of other men are holding on to. Then they'd literally pull you up by the rope. If you were inside the city and you wanted to get down, you'd have to have people pull you down with the rope. That way, the Keshlagites had complete control over who entered and left their city.

They were very efficient planners when it came to their city. They were able to grow enough crops inside their gates to feed their large population, yet have space for houses and other buildings and an outdoor market and stuff like that. Every house had a small garden crops on the roof, with a layer of dirt covering the roof, deep enough for some edible plants to grow. Also, many of their streets also passed as farming land, and people were very careful not to step on the crops. The walls of the city, which were wide enough for a two-horse chariot to pass through, was also a place where crops were grown.
For water, they did not have a cistern. A cistern or a well could be compromised by the enemy. Every day they women would lower themselves out of the city and return with water from the nearby ocean. They would take the water and use a simple desalinization process to make the water drinkable.
In this way the city provided for itself.

The reason the city had no gate was so that no invading army could get in. If an enemy army tried to topple the wall with a battering ram, the defending Keshlagites would shoot flaming arrows on the battering rams and destroy them. The same would apply to siege towers and very tall ladders used to scale the city. Also, they could simply cut grappling hooks if the enemy tried to climb the wall that way.
Since all the food was grown inside of the city, a siege could not defeat them. And even if they did suffer from a food shortage, they could simply send somebody down in the dead of night and steal food from the enemy camp. In fact, in the dead of night they could downright sneak into the enemy tents and kill the sleeping enemies, or poison their water supply.
Thus, the city was pretty much invincible.

Now, their history. When the Tribes of Israel descended from the desert to take the land of Canaan, the leaders of Israel were told by the LORD not to attack and destroy Keshlag, though all the other Canaanite tribes were to be devoted to destruction. The reasons for this were because:
A. The Keshlagites did not practice child sacrifice or cult prostitution (though they did have normal prostitution). Their unique religion did not call for this. They were not nearly as wicked as the other Canaanites were. Pretty much in Israel's eyes all the Keshlagites were guilty of was idolatry. Other groups of people not devoted to destruction practiced idolatry, so their existence was tolerable.
B. The Keshlagites were sealed away within their city. Therefore they could not negatively influence the Israelites.

So, the early Judges did not attack the city of Keshlag. They conquered all the rest of Israel, but the city of Keshlag stood in the midst of the land of Israel, unconquered. And they did not bother the Israelites, so they were left alone...at first.

During the reign of King Saul, the nation of Israel attacked Keshlag, but the siege was withdrawn after less than a year. When Israel and Judah split, Keshlag was within the territory of Israel. They fought several kings of Israel, who could never take the city.
Over the centuries, the Assyrians, Babylonians, and even the Persians tried in vain to take this city, even after the two Israelites kingdoms (Israel and Judah) were taken into captivity.

I will continue with the history later, but for now I'll talk about the expansion of their city. As their population grew they had to make their city bigger. But with a walled city, this was difficult. This is why they'd from time to time tear down part of their wall and build it again, with walls that stretched farther, and thus the city was made bigger. Of course, when they were doing this they were vulnerable to attack. This is why they did this in times when the nearby nations were at war. Provided they acted fast, the enemy would not get the chance to exploit this temporary weakness.

I will continue the story of the Keshlagite Civilization on a later post. For now, what do you think?
EndarkenedRationalist
Posts: 14,201
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1/17/2014 9:00:41 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/17/2014 6:19:24 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
Rules:
1. The civilization must be located here on Earth, and its location must be included.
2. Give that civilization a time period of its conception, and include its history.
3. If they lived in the past, please do not make them incredibly advanced for their time.
4. If they have an empire, please do not make them conquerors of the world.
5. Try to make it as realistic as you can.
6. Try not to make their territory overlap with another civilization that existed in that area at that time, but if this is too hard you can do so anyway. If they're nomadic, territory doesn't matter, but still include where they are.

Feel free to give them their own culture, their own name, their history, how they lived, their religion (either a real one or a religion you make up) and whatever else you think of. But try not to turn this forum into a huge dictionary of this civilization's fictional language. You can post a few words in their made up language, but don't go overboard on the civilization's language.

If your made up civilization is bizarre, feel free to post it anyway, as long as it's not outright stupid.

I actually created something similar to this, but it was in the future. (Around 2500 - so not too, too distant).
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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1/17/2014 9:20:35 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/17/2014 6:19:24 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
Rules:
1. The civilization must be located here on Earth, and its location must be included.
2. Give that civilization a time period of its conception, and include its history.
3. If they lived in the past, please do not make them incredibly advanced for their time.
4. If they have an empire, please do not make them conquerors of the world.
5. Try to make it as realistic as you can.
6. Try not to make their territory overlap with another civilization that existed in that area at that time, but if this is too hard you can do so anyway. If they're nomadic, territory doesn't matter, but still include where they are.

Feel free to give them their own culture, their own name, their history, how they lived, their religion (either a real one or a religion you make up) and whatever else you think of. But try not to turn this forum into a huge dictionary of this civilization's fictional language. You can post a few words in their made up language, but don't go overboard on the civilization's language.

If your made up civilization is bizarre, feel free to post it anyway, as long as it's not outright stupid.

I don't have a name quite yet for their civilization, but I'm labeling them the Utopians. It's first founded 20 years in the future and it's actually a melding of different cultures with a heavy emphasis on modern utopian philosophy. They strive to build a perfect society, eliminate the need for animal and plant-based food to sustain human ( the end of trophism ), and work to construct heaven on Earth.

I'll add more as more comes to me ( this actually a back history for a fiction story I've developed but need to complete ).
bubbatheclown
Posts: 1,258
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1/17/2014 9:21:15 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Keshlag: Part Two: Religion

I will now talk about the Keshlagite religion, that which led them to found their great city. They worshipped two deities: Ammut, the god which was everything spiritual, and Mahbu, the goddess who was the earth and everything physical upon it. Ammut and Mahbu were joined in sacred marriage, which was the model all humans were to follow.
Animals, which had no soul, were made entirely out of the substance of Mahbu. Spirits were made entirely out of the substance of Ammut. Humans, which had physical bodies yet had spirits, were made from both Ammut and Mahbu. Humans were the offspring of the two gods. Because only the Keshlagites worshipped Ammut and Mahbu, and it was the reason they separated themselves from the other Canaanites, the Keshlagites believed that they were a people favored by Ammut and Mahbu. It was a religion that gave them national pride in Keshlag.

There was a temple to Ammut and Mahbu, known as the Temple of the Divine Union. The temple had a room with a dirt room covered in salt, which symbolised danger and destruction. In the middle of the room was a circle where there was no salt. The line where salt could not pass was an imaginary line, representing the protection of the invisible gods. Inside this salt-free circle was an Olive Tree, representing the nation of Keshlag.
The overall message was that the invisible gods prevented Keshlag's destruction.

The Olive Tree would stand for 2000 years, people providing olives from generation to generation. When a Keshlagite king was coordinated, he would stand before the people with a bucket of olives taken from the sacred tree. The olives represented the people. The king would proceed to crush the olives with a club, symbolizing he would deal with his subjects as he saw fit. But then, the people would drink of the produced Olive oil, symbolizing that the king 's rule will be for the the good of the people of Keshlag. It was a kind of social contract.

I will post more later. I hope you found this interesting.
bubbatheclown
Posts: 1,258
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1/17/2014 9:23:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/17/2014 9:21:15 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
Keshlag: Part Two: Religion

I will now talk about the Keshlagite religion, that which led them to found their great city. They worshipped two deities: Ammut, the god which was everything spiritual, and Mahbu, the goddess who was the earth and everything physical upon it. Ammut and Mahbu were joined in sacred marriage, which was the model all humans were to follow.
Animals, which had no soul, were made entirely out of the substance of Mahbu. Spirits were made entirely out of the substance of Ammut. Humans, which had physical bodies yet had spirits, were made from both Ammut and Mahbu. Humans were the offspring of the two gods. Because only the Keshlagites worshipped Ammut and Mahbu, and it was the reason they separated themselves from the other Canaanites, the Keshlagites believed that they were a people favored by Ammut and Mahbu. It was a religion that gave them national pride in Keshlag.

There was a temple to Ammut and Mahbu, known as the Temple of the Divine Union. The temple had a room with a dirt room covered in salt, which symbolised danger and destruction. In the middle of the room was a circle where there was no salt. The line where salt could not pass was an imaginary line, representing the protection of the invisible gods. Inside this salt-free circle was an Olive Tree, representing the nation of Keshlag.
The overall message was that the invisible gods prevented Keshlag's destruction.

The Olive Tree would stand for 2000 years, people providing olives from generation to generation. When a Keshlagite king was coordinated, he would stand before the people with a bucket of olives taken from the sacred tree. The olives represented the people. The king would proceed to crush the olives with a club, symbolizing he would deal with his subjects as he saw fit. But then, the people would drink of the produced Olive oil, symbolizing that the king 's rule will be for the the good of the people of Keshlag. It was a kind of social contract.

I will post more later. I hope you found this interesting.

I meant when a king is crowned. I hate auto-correct.
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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1/17/2014 9:40:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Anyway, a philosophical debate ranges on between those that subscribe to Utopian beliefs and those that adhere to a Naturalistic viewpoint, though the Utopians actually up winning and are effective in changing society as they find it appropriate. Nevertheless there remain important individuals and pockets of resistance over the course of centuries that believe Naturalism is the better way. This debate effects everything in society, from economic theory and politics to religion.

My story actually takes place 300 years into the future.
Oromagi
Posts: 857
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1/18/2014 4:59:25 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
1. The civilization must be located here on Earth, and its location must be included.

My civilization is called Earth 2514 AD.

Give that civilization a time period of its conception, and include its history.

After the Digital Age came the Age of Robotics, when human labor became mostly redundant. Unemployment, starvation, and civil unrest were the hallmarks of this age.
Energy was scarce and became the most essential commodity. Fortunately and unfortunately, this was followed by the Century of Storms when human survival was challenged by mass drought and astonishing storms. This was a time of mass population decrease and disruption and saw the first real attempts to migrate people off the Earth. In the 23rd & 24th century, a solar system containing more than 20 planets that might be adapted to agriculture were discovered and human priorities were adapted to mass migration. Every two or three years another ship loaded with people and robots and material to build a new civilization is launched towards this archipelago, but because the system is 400 light years away the first colonists are only halfway there and it will be centuries before humanity knows whether this new system is truly viable. In the meantime, Earth 2514's priority is to sustain Earth as source of food and unique biology in the face of global cooling. Weather control is commonplace: imperfect but climate is significantly more stable.

Some of the great cities are gone: Venice and Mumbai, New Orleans and Miami are waterlogged ruins. But New York and Hong Kong and Amsterdam are now cities surrounded by high water walls with significant infrastructure maintained under water.
Europe is much colder since the Gulf Stream stopped with less agriculture and less population. The great deserts have receded and new cities have risen in the Sahara and the Gobi.

The population is about 2 billion and decreasing. By choice, few women bear more than one child. Scientists say 1 billion is the optimum number for sustaining Earth and that number now seems approachable even though most people live past 100 and many people live to 150. The oldest woman in the world is 176 years old.

Science is king in 2514. Most people are educated in one major and one minor scientific or technical field. Education is virtually free and most people try to specialize in something unique. Most education last for 20 years and most people work for 40 years, but the pace of employment and the length of the work week is far more leisurely with the wide use of robots for most manual and service labor. Capitalism and competition, investment and invention still drive the economy to some degree, but national and international governments control much of the means of production in energy, agriculture, education, infrastructure, health care. Sustainability, efficiency, building reserves for colonization are the priorities.

A tenth of the population lives in entirely artificial environments: many people live underwater, some people live in the sky. There is 30,000 km high elevator anchored to Antarctica for shipping material to an enormous anchoring station with 10,000 regular inhabitants. Ships arrive daily from mines and factories around the solar system. There are two other large space stations in orbit and dozens of small stations. There are a couple of small cities on the Moon, where much of the world's heavy industry has moved. On the Moon, massive Nuclear power plants store vast quantities of energy in highly efficient batteries to provide power to humanity. Solar power is collected on and off Earth on epic scales. And still, energy is always scarce. Much of it goes to power the robots.

There are more robots on Earth in 2514 than there were people in the 21st century. They do all the dirty and sweaty and unpleasant jobs of the modern age. Robots till the soil and clean the toilets. Every car and train and plane is automated. And almost every human has a handy. A handy is a personal robot: nurse and purse, nanny and wallet, phone and computer, television and tour guide, teacher and slave. Most handys look like human sized stick figures, with lenses and sensors and holographic projectors in roughly anthropomorphic faces. There are robots that look and act very human, but these are very expensive and reserved for specialized purposes. Handys are like smartphones today in that they are highly customizable and their software and hardware is constantly changing to meet its masters' needs. But they are also a little piece of big brother, constantly monitoring and worrying and sometimes challenging antisocial or unhealthy behaviors. Few people die in accidents when handys are around as they are quick to the rescue. Few fires gets out of hand, because a handy is always ready to suppress. Few crimes are committed since a handy will often interfere or monitor and report. But handys can also offer a wide range of freedom for children and the elderly and the disabled. Most can holographically project all manner of entertainments and distractions and games.

To conserve energy, most people live in cities, in high rise condominiums. Socializing, dining, exercise tend to be public, communal activities organized by buildings and by blocks. In the absence of much normal human labor, exercise and sport are an important part of daily life. There are a vast variety of sports organized at virtually every level of community and most people belong to one or two teams with which they train. Most people participate in or attend some sporting event on a daily basis. Competitions are organized for almost any every level of ability and age and the best players are advanced into competitions at city, national, and even international levels.

Hunger is virtually non-existent. Food is cheap and eating out is an ordinary part of daily life. However, cuisine is no longer the art form it is today. Cooking your own food is fairly esoteric hobby, and there are few professional chefs evolving techniques and flavors so food has become relatively standardized and healthier. Meat and dairy is very expensive, most people are vegans by default and meat is considered exotic or even revolting.

Transportation is cheap and tourism is a regular part of most lives. Many devote 3 or 4 weeks to travel each year. Getting to the moon or taking a month long cruise to Mars is expensive but many people get to space for their honeymoon or that once in a lifetime trip.

Religion is still popular, but much more personal and heterogeneous than now. Churches and temples are less common. Buddhism is the most popular religion, but just about everybody celebrates Christmas. After the last big explosion of Vesuvius, the Vatican became a world heritage site. There a few men and women who are called the Pope, but the most popular Pope left on a spaceship out to the new colonies. Jerusalem followed the Vatican 50 years later, Mecca 50 years after that. People like to visit and pray and learn, but few ascribe to a single religion as normative.

War is rare. There are still nations and some national identity, but international corporations and organizations and science bodies control most of the wealth and armaments. There are still some terrorists and rebels, but few humans hold out for long against robot soldiers. Robots fighting robots gets terribly expensive, so the powers that be tend to frown on any large scale combat.

Since preserving the biological diversity has become a major priority, animal populations have exploded. Vast herds of bison cover the North American plains. Flocks of birds can block out the sun for an hour. Many species are extinct, but some have been restored: carrier pigeons and dodos are back, there is a herd of woolly mammoths in Eastern Russia.
bubbatheclown
Posts: 1,258
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1/18/2014 9:44:02 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
That's a good idea, Oromagi. But honestly, even considering how good that century is, I might be hesitant to live there. Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone? Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.
I'm just giving a small commentary on your story. Feel free to do so to other people's ideas.
bubbatheclown
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1/18/2014 9:59:43 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/18/2014 9:44:02 AM, bubbatheclown wrote:
That's a good idea, Oromagi. But honestly, even considering how good that century is, I might be hesitant to live there. Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone? Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.
I'm just giving a small commentary on your story. Feel free to do so to other people's ideas.

Also, I wouldn't want to give up meat.
bubbatheclown
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1/18/2014 11:05:26 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Keshlag: Part Three: Continuation of History

Alexander the Great, on his conquests throughout Asia, heard of a city that had stood unconquered for nearly 1500 years.
He said, "How can I call myself Lord of Asia when there remains but one unconquered city to bring scorn upon me?"
So, Alexander the Great attempted to conquer the city of Keshlag. His siege engines were set on fire by the defending Keshlagites and the wall was by this time too high for his archers to hit the top of the wall. Thus, Alexander resorted to a siege. But after having Keshlag saboteurs sneak into his camp every night and kill his men in their sleep, his men grew more and more nervous, more and more paranoid that the enemies were all over the place. Soon enough, some of Alexander's soldiers grew paranoid to the point where they'd kill one of their own, mistaking their victims for Keshlagites.
After a mere five months, Alexander ended the siege and marched on to conquer other kingdoms. Keshlag had withstood the might of Alexander the Great.

Though Keshlag was unconquered, it was surrounded by conquered peoples, peoples under the dominion of the Hellenistic Empire, which soon broke apart and the Seleucid Empire became the closest threat to Keshlag's independence.
The Seleucid kings attempted several times to conquer Keshlag, with attempts that ended in failure. As the Seleucid king prepared a vast army for the ultimate siege against Keshlag, the Maccabees rose up against the Greeks and made Israel independent. The newly formed Israelite nation did not attempt to take Keshlag.

But guess what! The famous Roman, Pompey, conquered Israel for Rome and turned it into the Province of Judea. A single Roman legion tried in vain to capture the city.
In 24 BC there was a second attempt to capture Keshlag, which involved three legions and multiple auxiliary units. The attempt was quickly called off because the Legions were taken from Judea, and in the absence of the Romans the Jews attempted to revolt.
So it held out under the Romans, then the Byzantines, then the Arab Empires, and then the Ottoman Empire.

But when the Ottoman Empire came to power, they had cannons. The ancient walls of Keshlag, whose territory now comprised of one sixth of Israel, would be defenseless. To prevent this, the Keshlagites did something that they rarely did: they came out from behind their walls and fought the Ottomans in offensive combat. They ambushed the Ottomans five miles from Keshlag, and using bows they killed the enemy commander and destroyed the Ottoman standard, causing the enemy to scatter and flee. The Keshlagites pursued this large force, which got tangled in itself because the force was too large and clumsy. As they tried to run the Keshlagites killed nearly half of the enemy army, which escaped to a town thirty miles from Keshlag.
From that point on the Keshlagites instituted a spy network. They knew the Ottomans would try again, so they'd always keep several spies inside the Ottoman Army, to sabotage them. They also sent raiding parties outside of the walls to steal cannons from the Ottomans. They began guarding the outside of their walls. They also infiltrated the network of Ottoman rulers and kept local governors under control through bribery and intimidation. So, for 500 years the Keshlagites were free from attack.

Over time they built up their army and armed their troops with firearms instead of javelins and bows.
When WWI came around, the Keshlagites (but by now they were called the Keshlans) sided with the British. They Keshlans had several battleships, about five of them ironclad vessels. The Keshlans lost 20,000 people in WWI, but they won.
Realiziing that their walls were useless now, the Keshlans had dismantled their wall beginning in the 1840s and finishing in the 1890s. They could now defend themselves without their wall.

Anyhow, when the Ottomans were gone the British Mandate of Palestine took its place. And guess what: the way better armed British attacked Keshlag...and won. The British conquered the nation of Keshla, and the Keshlans were subjugated by the British.

But the Keshlans would never submit to the yoke of another nation. So, under the guidance of a Keshlan millionaire the Keshlan people began a bold project, a project not ever undertaken by any other people or nation.
They created a walled city within the ocean, filled with water. Then they pumped the water out. What was the seabed was the ground, and the water was held back by the walls made of steel and concrete. The project began in 1932, and by 1989 the city of New Keshla was almost as large as New York. It became the new home of the Keshlan people. There are many different layers of this city, layers divided by walls. If a wall is breached the people can simply retreat into another layer. And considering the walls are made of steel and concrete and are regularly given maintenance, a naturally occurring breach is unlikely.

Today, the nation of New Keshla has an ant-aircraft defense system, a Navy with a few battleships and one aircraft carrier, a defense force for the event that an enemy comes inside the walls of New Keshla, and an Air Force (that's what the aircraft carrier's for). They are regularly expanding their city, which is located in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, about twenty miles from the Israeli coast. They have strong ties to Israel, which is a major partner in trade and defense.
The worship of Ammut and Mahbu has become mostly obsolete, but about 4.7 million Keshlans out of 59 million worldwide still worship these two deities. There are some Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Keshlans.
The nation has a sound economy, and extreme poverty does not exist there, though there are poor people.
Oromagi
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1/18/2014 7:13:49 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone?

Of course I've considered it, It is hard to think of SciFi book or movie with robots where the robots don't become sentient and usually become violent. But that scenario has never made much sense to me. Do we have any kind of understanding of how sentience or will or even intelligence really works yet? No. So why do we assume we'll be able to transfer those properties to inanimate objects? It would be more reasonable to predict that dogs or chimps will achieve sentience and attack since at least we've seen sentience appear in higher order mammals once before and some dogs and chimps are given to violent impulses. Yet we don't worry about the dogs, we worry about robots. It reminds of how every doctor and scientist in 1850 was convinced that traveling faster than 30mph would be incredibly dangerous l, bones would snap and brainpans would be concussed. We've deployed 30,000 robots in battle in the Middle East without worrying about whether they might turn rogue. Our smartphones get smarter every day, yet nobody worries that their iphone might attack. Machines do what we program them to do. If we are simply smart enough to avoid programming robots to destroy all humans, then we should be okay.

Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.

Well, I believe that big government is an inevitable artifact of the future, but it doesn't have to be bad government. In this scenario, most of the wealth and power belongs to a number of international corporations, cartels, and scientific enterprises. National govts collect the taxes and maintain the infrastructure, but they aren't really the final word in terms of policy anymore. Obviously, in any future where spaceflight is a realistic option, then space is the high ground. It is entirely possible that some Nation or combination of nations achieves dominion over space, but since gigantic projects like space elevators, moon bases, and colony ships would require collective, international investment and effort, I doubt one nation could pull it off without first achieving hegemony over the Earth.

So nations have power, but the real power belongs to business and science. These interests have the capacity to dominate humanity, but little motivation to do so. To the degree that political and social unrest are relatively quiescent, the powers that be don't feel threatened and can maintain a pretty loose grip.
bubbatheclown
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1/18/2014 7:40:40 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/18/2014 7:13:49 PM, Oromagi wrote:
Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone?

Of course I've considered it, It is hard to think of SciFi book or movie with robots where the robots don't become sentient and usually become violent. But that scenario has never made much sense to me. Do we have any kind of understanding of how sentience or will or even intelligence really works yet? No. So why do we assume we'll be able to transfer those properties to inanimate objects? It would be more reasonable to predict that dogs or chimps will achieve sentience and attack since at least we've seen sentience appear in higher order mammals once before and some dogs and chimps are given to violent impulses. Yet we don't worry about the dogs, we worry about robots. It reminds of how every doctor and scientist in 1850 was convinced that traveling faster than 30mph would be incredibly dangerous l, bones would snap and brainpans would be concussed. We've deployed 30,000 robots in battle in the Middle East without worrying about whether they might turn rogue. Our smartphones get smarter every day, yet nobody worries that their iphone might attack. Machines do what we program them to do. If we are simply smart enough to avoid programming robots to destroy all humans, then we should be okay.

Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.

Well, I believe that big government is an inevitable artifact of the future, but it doesn't have to be bad government. In this scenario, most of the wealth and power belongs to a number of international corporations, cartels, and scientific enterprises. National govts collect the taxes and maintain the infrastructure, but they aren't really the final word in terms of policy anymore. Obviously, in any future where spaceflight is a realistic option, then space is the high ground. It is entirely possible that some Nation or combination of nations achieves dominion over space, but since gigantic projects like space elevators, moon bases, and colony ships would require collective, international investment and effort, I doubt one nation could pull it off without first achieving hegemony over the Earth.

So nations have power, but the real power belongs to business and science. These interests have the capacity to dominate humanity, but little motivation to do so. To the degree that political and social unrest are relatively quiescent, the powers that be don't feel threatened and can maintain a pretty loose grip.

Well said, Oromagi.
bubbatheclown
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1/18/2014 8:01:41 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Keshlag Part Four:

This is the last chapter in the story of the Keshlagites.

I will talk about their language, which has been influenced at least to some extent by Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, and Arabic. "Amma" is mother and "abba" is father. "Imsh" is man and "imsha" is woman. "Sayam" is hello and goodbye, but it literally means peace.

Wooden disks made from tree stumps are an important icon of their civilization. Carved wooden disks are emblems of different clans. And a tall pillar made from the disks from 40 different clans, a pillar which stands in the middle of city, was a symbol established in the 9th century AD. It was dismantled in the 12th century AD after everyone forgot what it meant.
For thousands of years they had a tradition of tattooing the backs of their men with hot iron, a very painful procedure. In their culture 14 is the age that a boy becomes a man, and that is when he gets the tattoo.

I am finished with the story of the Keshlagites. Maybe I'll write another one. Anyhow, feel free to post your own civilization ideas.
theta_pinch
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1/18/2014 8:22:59 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia

Established: 2032
Present date: 2124

Environment: Mountainous, island , many caves, many deltas with water coming from an uknown source that has concentrations of deuterium 8000 times the average.

Education system: start at age 5 end at age 14. At age 14 they decide on a career and find a master of that "craft" who will teach them.

Primary export: fusion reactors; the most efficient ones ever developed.

History and government coming soon.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 2:55:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia--a history

2027--World War 3 starts.
2031--An American group of scientists on an expedition to Antarctic finds a large island in there surrounded by a curious weather phenomenon that causes year round temperatures of 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit and normal nights and days.
2031: The news of the island is spread and a conference attended by people from around the world is held and it is decided that they will make a civilization there isolated from the war.
2032: The constitution of Anomalia is created.
2033: People start getting sick from the water taken from the delta's. After much examination it's determined that the sickness is due to a high concentration of heavy water in the lakes.
2034-2042: The first large ocean water purification plants are created. Power problems are abundant.
2045: Simple fusion reactors are developed that solve the purification plant energy problem-peak output: 5.6 megajoules. The heavy water found in the delta's is used as fuel for the reactors.
2045-2083: Major improvements in reactors are made to the reactors-Peak output: 10.6 gigajoules.
2087: Fusion Reactors become the main export of Anomalia.
2092: The island's name is changed to Fusia; the constitution of Anomalia is renamed the Constitution of Fusia.
2083-2115: Improvements are made to the reactors-Peak output: 3.2 megajoules.
2124: Fusia becomes the least populated world superpower with a population of 23.5 Million citizens.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
bubbatheclown
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1/19/2014 3:05:51 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/19/2014 2:55:24 PM, theta_pinch wrote:
Fusia--a history

2027--World War 3 starts.
2031--An American group of scientists on an expedition to Antarctic finds a large island in there surrounded by a curious weather phenomenon that causes year round temperatures of 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit and normal nights and days.
2031: The news of the island is spread and a conference attended by people from around the world is held and it is decided that they will make a civilization there isolated from the war.
2032: The constitution of Anomalia is created.
2033: People start getting sick from the water taken from the delta's. After much examination it's determined that the sickness is due to a high concentration of heavy water in the lakes.
2034-2042: The first large ocean water purification plants are created. Power problems are abundant.
2045: Simple fusion reactors are developed that solve the purification plant energy problem-peak output: 5.6 megajoules. The heavy water found in the delta's is used as fuel for the reactors.
2045-2083: Major improvements in reactors are made to the reactors-Peak output: 10.6 gigajoules.
2087: Fusion Reactors become the main export of Anomalia.
2092: The island's name is changed to Fusia; the constitution of Anomalia is renamed the Constitution of Fusia.
2083-2115: Improvements are made to the reactors-Peak output: 3.2 megajoules.
2124: Fusia becomes the least populated world superpower with a population of 23.5 Million citizens.

Nice. But what does WWIII have to do with anything here?
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 3:11:45 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia was founded by pacifists for the reason of being isolated from world war 3. World War 3 is the reason those people started a new country on the island.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 3:14:22 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Basically World War 3 is the catalyst.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 3:37:55 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia-culture

Fusians have a culture based on Humanistic beliefs. They are not very religious but have a very tolerant but moralistic culture. The arts and sciences are held in great esteem.

Fusians have several awards:
The innovation award: An annual award that goes to the most innovative person that year.
The science awards: An annual award that goes to those who made the largest contributions to science that year.
The art awards: An annual award that goes to the person who made the greatest work of art that year.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 3:44:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/18/2014 9:44:02 AM, bubbatheclown wrote:
That's a good idea, Oromagi. But honestly, even considering how good that century is, I might be hesitant to live there. Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone? Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.
I'm just giving a small commentary on your story. Feel free to do so to other people's ideas.

Would you think about living in Fusia?
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
bubbatheclown
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1/19/2014 5:18:57 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/19/2014 3:44:34 PM, theta_pinch wrote:
At 1/18/2014 9:44:02 AM, bubbatheclown wrote:
That's a good idea, Oromagi. But honestly, even considering how good that century is, I might be hesitant to live there. Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone? Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.
I'm just giving a small commentary on your story. Feel free to do so to other people's ideas.

Would you think about living in Fusia?

There are several factors to determine that. For instance, I'm presuming based off their technological advancement that the standard of living is high, probably even higher than what citizens of the US and Western Europe and Japan have today. That's definitely a positive sign.
However, you haven't mentioned the level of government interference in everyday life. Does the Government of Fusia have an advanced surveillance system set up? This can prevent terrorism, but it can also be used to secure government control.
Good governments should be strong enough to defend itself against a rioting population. However, bad governments should be weak enough to be overthrown. Even a large army can be beaten with asymmetrical warfare, but if the government has a sufficiently advanced information network then this will not work, and the government would be literally unstoppable, except by invasion of another nation.
If this nation had advanced government surveillance, if possession of firearms by civilians is not allowed, that would be a negative factor in deciding whether or not I'd want to live there. If it's more of a libertarian government that doesn't believe in excessive spying, then that'd be a positive factor in my decision.
Also, what is the state of the United States at the time? Has WWIII destroyed it? If the answer is yes, then I'd probably live in Fusia even with a big brother government. If the answer to this question is no, then my decision would be based off what the standard of living is in the United States. If it's about the same as it is today or a little more advanced I'd stick with the United States.
There are many factors involved in a decision like this. But so far it doesn't sound too bad.
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 5:42:44 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/19/2014 5:18:57 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
At 1/19/2014 3:44:34 PM, theta_pinch wrote:
At 1/18/2014 9:44:02 AM, bubbatheclown wrote:
That's a good idea, Oromagi. But honestly, even considering how good that century is, I might be hesitant to live there. Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone? Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.
I'm just giving a small commentary on your story. Feel free to do so to other people's ideas.

Would you think about living in Fusia?

There are several factors to determine that. For instance, I'm presuming based off their technological advancement that the standard of living is high, probably even higher than what citizens of the US and Western Europe and Japan have today. That's definitely a positive sign.
However, you haven't mentioned the level of government interference in everyday life. Does the Government of Fusia have an advanced surveillance system set up?

No there's barely any surveillance inside of Fusia aside from police.

This can prevent terrorism, but it can also be used to secure government control.

Terrorism is prevented due to the mountainous terrain forming a natural barrier around it. The only way to get in other than the from the air is to go through a cave which is difficult to navigate without a guide. Terrorists are prevented from getting in by flying because flights into Fusia are monitored; to get in a unique code has to be given. The code is transmitted to the flight operator after the flight is scheduled.

Good governments should be strong enough to defend itself against a rioting population. However, bad governments should be weak enough to be overthrown.

It's a small government based on a form of meritocracy; I'll post more about that later; the officials are individually selected by their peers.

Even a large army can be beaten with asymmetrical warfare, but if the government :has a sufficiently advanced information network then this will not work, and the :government would be literally unstoppable, except by invasion of another nation.

Well since the main government building is inside the caves it should be fairly easy to prevent them from taking over by simply blocking the entrances.

If this nation had advanced government surveillance, if possession of firearms by :civilians is not allowed, that would be a negative factor in deciding whether or not I'd :want to live there. If it's more of a libertarian government that doesn't believe in :excessive spying, then that'd be a positive factor in my decision.

There isn't any spying going on inside Fusia.
Also, what is the state of the United States at the time? Has WWIII destroyed it? If the answer is yes, then I'd probably live in Fusia even with a big brother government. If the answer to this question is no, then my decision would be based off what the standard of living is in the United States. If it's about the same as it is today or a little more advanced I'd stick with the United States.

The United States didn't come away from WW3 unscathed but by present the united states has largely recovered from the war, so it's government is virtually unchanged but the technology has improved quite a bit.
There are many factors involved in a decision like this. But so far it doesn't sound too bad.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
bubbatheclown
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1/19/2014 5:45:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/19/2014 5:42:44 PM, theta_pinch wrote:
At 1/19/2014 5:18:57 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
At 1/19/2014 3:44:34 PM, theta_pinch wrote:
At 1/18/2014 9:44:02 AM, bubbatheclown wrote:
That's a good idea, Oromagi. But honestly, even considering how good that century is, I might be hesitant to live there. Have you taken into consideration the possibility of the robots becoming glitchy or becoming united under an artificial intelligence that hates everyone? Also, I can imagine that in 500 years the federal government would be powerful enough to do literally anything it wanted to, even without regard to the people. If this government grew corrupt, then humanity would be enslaved without any possibility of escape from this global government.
I'm just giving a small commentary on your story. Feel free to do so to other people's ideas.

Would you think about living in Fusia?

There are several factors to determine that. For instance, I'm presuming based off their technological advancement that the standard of living is high, probably even higher than what citizens of the US and Western Europe and Japan have today. That's definitely a positive sign.
However, you haven't mentioned the level of government interference in everyday life. Does the Government of Fusia have an advanced surveillance system set up?

No there's barely any surveillance inside of Fusia aside from police.

This can prevent terrorism, but it can also be used to secure government control.

Terrorism is prevented due to the mountainous terrain forming a natural barrier around it. The only way to get in other than the from the air is to go through a cave which is difficult to navigate without a guide. Terrorists are prevented from getting in by flying because flights into Fusia are monitored; to get in a unique code has to be given. The code is transmitted to the flight operator after the flight is scheduled.

Good governments should be strong enough to defend itself against a rioting population. However, bad governments should be weak enough to be overthrown.

It's a small government based on a form of meritocracy; I'll post more about that later; the officials are individually selected by their peers.

Even a large army can be beaten with asymmetrical warfare, but if the government :has a sufficiently advanced information network then this will not work, and the :government would be literally unstoppable, except by invasion of another nation.

Well since the main government building is inside the caves it should be fairly easy to prevent them from taking over by simply blocking the entrances.

If this nation had advanced government surveillance, if possession of firearms by :civilians is not allowed, that would be a negative factor in deciding whether or not I'd :want to live there. If it's more of a libertarian government that doesn't believe in :excessive spying, then that'd be a positive factor in my decision.

There isn't any spying going on inside Fusia.
Also, what is the state of the United States at the time? Has WWIII destroyed it? If the answer is yes, then I'd probably live in Fusia even with a big brother government. If the answer to this question is no, then my decision would be based off what the standard of living is in the United States. If it's about the same as it is today or a little more advanced I'd stick with the United States.

The United States didn't come away from WW3 unscathed but by present the united states has largely recovered from the war, so it's government is virtually unchanged but the technology has improved quite a bit.
There are many factors involved in a decision like this. But so far it doesn't sound too bad.

If the United States is still around and yet it presumably has increased its surveilance program, and Fusia has a relatively small government that could be overthrown if need be, I think I'd live in Fusia then.
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 5:58:05 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia-Government

Fusia's government is a meritocracy based around a council of representatives.

The representatives are peer elected; so for example climatological scientists would elect a climate scientist to be a representative for climate issues. For history education standards a historian would be elected by his/her peers to determine history education standards.

The idea behind Fusia's government is that the people who know most about the issue to be addressed should be the ones addressing it. However for domestic issues it will be a general vote among the citizens. Any citizen can give a suggestions for improvements to Fusia or new projects that will be considered by the appropriate representative(s.)

There are two branches of government; the council and the Supreme court. The council's representatives determine policy and laws and the Supreme court determines whether it is constitutional.

More on the constitution of Fusia next time.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 6:11:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia Constitution/bill of rights

All citizens have freedom of speech, the press, religion (as long as it isn't harmful to others), peaceful assembly, and artistic expression.
All citizens above the age of 16 are allowed to send improvement/project proposals to the appropriate representative(it allows the public to take part in the government and help improve Fusia.)
All citizens have the right to a fair trial.
Citizens have a right to bear arms(tranquilizer gun, taser or pulsed plasma projectile; all are non-lethal and simply stun; it's supposed to reduce crime rates.)
All citizens have a right against unreasonable searches and seizure; a warrant is required and there has to be a high probability of criminal activity to get the warrant. No cruel and unusual punishment or excessive fines and no executions.
The government will not withhold information from the public.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson
theta_pinch
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1/19/2014 6:21:05 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Fusia

Money- in Fusia money is in the form of work credits; one credit is equal to roughly 3.50 US$ circa. 1980.
Work credits are awarded based on a complex algorithm that takes into account many factors including experience, productivity, need(as in a family of four needs more than a single person living alone)....etc.
Work credits will have an inherent value of 3.50 US$ circa. 1980 regardless of the number of work credits.
Any sufficiently complex phenomenon is indistinguishable from magic--Me

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it."
Niel deGrasse Tyson