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Why was FDR initionally isolationist?

Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini
Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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3/26/2014 12:53:23 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Something caused him to make different decisions than previously
But he wasn't an isolationist originally
Maybe members of his cabinet wanted power and war
SemperVI
Posts: 294
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4/6/2014 7:42:41 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

What in the world are they teaching you kids these days in school?

First and foremost, FDR was not an isolationist! He was exactly the opposite. He wanted in on WW2 right off the bat. The American people were isolationists. They realized after WWI that Europe's problems should not be U.S. problems.

In what case did FDR seem to support Mussolini and Hitler? There was a brief period before the war started both Hitler and Mussolini shared global popularity. There was no reason for people to dislike them.

Finally, Truman was not even in Executive office until 1945. During most of the war he was a US Senator and did not become Vice President until late into the war. Point in fact, he was the least involved Vice President in history. FDR and Truman met only twice.
Adam2
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4/6/2014 7:47:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/6/2014 7:42:41 PM, SemperVI wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

What in the world are they teaching you kids these days in school?

First and foremost, FDR was not an isolationist! He was exactly the opposite. He wanted in on WW2 right off the bat. The American people were isolationists. They realized after WWI that Europe's problems should not be U.S. problems.

In what case did FDR seem to support Mussolini and Hitler? There was a brief period before the war started both Hitler and Mussolini shared global popularity. There was no reason for people to dislike them.

Finally, Truman was not even in Executive office until 1945. During most of the war he was a US Senator and did not become Vice President until late into the war. Point in fact, he was the least involved Vice President in history. FDR and Truman met only twice.

Pardon me, Truman was more of a warmonger than FDR.
Anyways, FDR believed in the good neighbor policy, which Truman didn't believe in. He actually wanted to scare the USSR, so he nuked Japan to hurt them.
WheezySquash8
Posts: 130
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4/11/2014 5:28:23 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

I believe that he was an isolationist because he wanted America to focus on their own issues at the time rather than foreign issues.
Pacifist Since 3/12/14
Wheezy
Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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4/11/2014 7:14:22 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/11/2014 5:28:23 AM, WheezySquash8 wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

I believe that he was an isolationist because he wanted America to focus on their own issues at the time rather than foreign issues.

Wasn't it FDR that believed and passed the Good Neighbor Policy? I think he was coerced into agreeing with WWII. I don't think he wanted any part. He was like the Chamberlain of the USA
While Truman wanted to, in some cases, conquer our neighbors. He got us involved in Korea.
Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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4/11/2014 7:14:49 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/11/2014 5:28:23 AM, WheezySquash8 wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

I believe that he was an isolationist because he wanted America to focus on their own issues at the time rather than foreign issues.

OK, lol, Korea ain't our neighbor, but he wanted conquer nevertheless.
Subutai
Posts: 3,238
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4/15/2014 4:29:53 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

FDR was not an isolationist. The only reason he didn't go in WWII before Pearl Harbor was because a sizable portion of the US population was isolationist. Also, how did FDR support Hitler and Mussolini?
I'm becoming less defined as days go by, fading away, and well you might say, I'm losing focus, kinda drifting into the abstract in terms of how I see myself.
Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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4/15/2014 7:52:23 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/15/2014 4:29:53 AM, Subutai wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

FDR was not an isolationist. The only reason he didn't go in WWII before Pearl Harbor was because a sizable portion of the US population was isolationist. Also, how did FDR support Hitler and Mussolini?

Wait, wasn't it FDR who passed the Good neighbor policy. That doesn't sound like someone who isn't isolationist. Wilson was a pure warmonger.
Subutai
Posts: 3,238
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4/15/2014 9:35:38 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/15/2014 7:52:23 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 4/15/2014 4:29:53 AM, Subutai wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

FDR was not an isolationist. The only reason he didn't go in WWII before Pearl Harbor was because a sizable portion of the US population was isolationist. Also, how did FDR support Hitler and Mussolini?

Wait, wasn't it FDR who passed the Good neighbor policy. That doesn't sound like someone who isn't isolationist. Wilson was a pure warmonger.

One, the good neighbor policy was not isolationist, it was non-interventionist. There is a lot of difference between the two foreign policies. And two, Wilson was more of an isolationist than FDR, waiting until the Zimmerman Telegram to go into WWI, even though he had a "valid" claim to enter the war earlier.
I'm becoming less defined as days go by, fading away, and well you might say, I'm losing focus, kinda drifting into the abstract in terms of how I see myself.
Adam2
Posts: 1,024
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4/16/2014 6:01:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/15/2014 9:35:38 PM, Subutai wrote:
At 4/15/2014 7:52:23 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 4/15/2014 4:29:53 AM, Subutai wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

FDR was not an isolationist. The only reason he didn't go in WWII before Pearl Harbor was because a sizable portion of the US population was isolationist. Also, how did FDR support Hitler and Mussolini?

Wait, wasn't it FDR who passed the Good neighbor policy. That doesn't sound like someone who isn't isolationist. Wilson was a pure warmonger.

One, the good neighbor policy was not isolationist, it was non-interventionist. There is a lot of difference between the two foreign policies. And two, Wilson was more of an isolationist than FDR, waiting until the Zimmerman Telegram to go into WWI, even though he had a "valid" claim to enter the war earlier.

All the claims made about FDR are more true about Wilson. Wilson was hungry for a war.
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
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4/19/2014 6:43:29 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

FDR wasn't an isolationist, as shown in his famous quarantine speech, where he wanted to test public opinion by proposing that they should essentially go to war to get rid of the aggressor (the aggressors were that of the Fascist, so no he did not at all support Hitler or Mussolini). Of course, it received so much negative backlash that he just dropped the idea.
WheezySquash8
Posts: 130
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4/22/2014 9:47:38 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

I don't think that was INTENTIONALLY an Isolationist.
Pacifist Since 3/12/14
Wheezy
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
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4/22/2014 10:08:10 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

Roosevelt wasn't isolationist, but most of the country, along with Congress, was. "Upon taking office, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt tended to see a necessity for the United States to participate more actively in international affairs, but his ability to apply his personal outlook to foreign policy was limited by the strength of isolationist sentiment in the U.S. Congress." ~ history.state.gov. In 1933 Roosevelt proposed a Congressional measure that would have granted him more power to oppose aggressive countries, but the measure was defeated. In 1935 controversy over U.S. participation in the World Court brought about similar opposition, and led Congress to pass a series of laws mandating neutrality. Roosevelt did whatever he could to act behind the scenes, especially in conjunction with Britain, but if it hadn't been for Pearl Harbor there is no telling if the US would have entered the war in time to help rescue the British people from the u-boat blockade.
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
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4/22/2014 10:17:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/6/2014 7:47:16 PM, Adam2 wrote:
At 4/6/2014 7:42:41 PM, SemperVI wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

What in the world are they teaching you kids these days in school?

First and foremost, FDR was not an isolationist! He was exactly the opposite. He wanted in on WW2 right off the bat. The American people were isolationists. They realized after WWI that Europe's problems should not be U.S. problems.

In what case did FDR seem to support Mussolini and Hitler? There was a brief period before the war started both Hitler and Mussolini shared global popularity. There was no reason for people to dislike them.

Finally, Truman was not even in Executive office until 1945. During most of the war he was a US Senator and did not become Vice President until late into the war. Point in fact, he was the least involved Vice President in history. FDR and Truman met only twice.

Pardon me, Truman was more of a warmonger than FDR.
Anyways, FDR believed in the good neighbor policy, which Truman didn't believe in. He actually wanted to scare the USSR, so he nuked Japan to hurt them.

While "nuking" Japan was almost certainly influenced by the Allies' need to provide a show-of-force in the face of Russian land-acquisitions, I hardly think it's fair to say that Truman did it just to hurt the Russians. After so many years of constant fighting there was a hunger for the war to end, and to do so quickly. Americans were still dying every day, and the kamikaze attacks made them seem inhuman to Americans who didn't understand their traditions. They actually came to believe that the Japanese weren't "human" like us, and that only force would subdue them. I don't necessarily agree that it was the right decision, but then I wasn't the President in 1945, so my understanding of the world mood and the political situation isn't what Truman's was.
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
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4/22/2014 10:18:25 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/11/2014 5:28:23 AM, WheezySquash8 wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

I believe that he was an isolationist because he wanted America to focus on their own issues at the time rather than foreign issues.

He wasn't isolationist.
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
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4/22/2014 10:20:08 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/11/2014 7:14:22 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 4/11/2014 5:28:23 AM, WheezySquash8 wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

I believe that he was an isolationist because he wanted America to focus on their own issues at the time rather than foreign issues.

Wasn't it FDR that believed and passed the Good Neighbor Policy? I think he was coerced into agreeing with WWII. I don't think he wanted any part. He was like the Chamberlain of the USA
While Truman wanted to, in some cases, conquer our neighbors. He got us involved in Korea.

My thoughts echo those of SemperVI: "What in the world are they teaching you kids these days in school?"
Idealist
Posts: 2,520
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4/22/2014 10:22:52 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/15/2014 7:52:23 AM, Adam2 wrote:
At 4/15/2014 4:29:53 AM, Subutai wrote:
At 3/26/2014 12:52:37 PM, Adam2 wrote:
In many cases he seemed to have supported Hitler and Mussolini

Truman was more of a warmonger than Mussolini

FDR was not an isolationist. The only reason he didn't go in WWII before Pearl Harbor was because a sizable portion of the US population was isolationist. Also, how did FDR support Hitler and Mussolini?

Wait, wasn't it FDR who passed the Good neighbor policy. That doesn't sound like someone who isn't isolationist. Wilson was a pure warmonger.

The Good Neighbor policy was the foreign policy of the administration of United States President Franklin Roosevelt toward the countries of Latin America. They were our neighbors, not Germany, Italy or Japan.