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How Japanese convinced pilots to be kamikaze

Hayd
Posts: 4,022
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5/1/2016 8:34:29 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
How do you think the squadron meeting would have gone down during WW2 when the leader tells the pilots it will be a kamikaze attack? Do you think it was voluntary or used as a punishment?

There is an article that has copies of a suicide manual. One excerpt says

At the very moment of impact: do your best. Every deity and the spirits of your dead comrades are watching you intently. Just before the collision it is essential that you do not shut your eyes for a moment so as not to miss the target. Many have crashed into the targets with wide-open eyes. They will tell you what fun they had.

Thoughts? Was this an effective military strategy as well?
Sam7411
Posts: 959
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5/1/2016 8:43:53 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 5/1/2016 8:34:29 PM, Hayd wrote:
How do you think the squadron meeting would have gone down during WW2 when the leader tells the pilots it will be a kamikaze attack? Do you think it was voluntary or used as a punishment?

There is an article that has copies of a suicide manual. One excerpt says

At the very moment of impact: do your best. Every deity and the spirits of your dead comrades are watching you intently. Just before the collision it is essential that you do not shut your eyes for a moment so as not to miss the target. Many have crashed into the targets with wide-open eyes. They will tell you what fun they had.

Thoughts? Was this an effective military strategy as well?

Having just finished a unit on Japanese warrior culture and imperialism, I would think most if not all pilots would've have gladly died for their country. And, it's hard to tell if was really effective. You lost a pilot, who most of the times missed or caused little damage.
Hayd
Posts: 4,022
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5/1/2016 8:51:27 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 5/1/2016 8:43:53 PM, Sam7411 wrote:
At 5/1/2016 8:34:29 PM, Hayd wrote:
How do you think the squadron meeting would have gone down during WW2 when the leader tells the pilots it will be a kamikaze attack? Do you think it was voluntary or used as a punishment?

There is an article that has copies of a suicide manual. One excerpt says

At the very moment of impact: do your best. Every deity and the spirits of your dead comrades are watching you intently. Just before the collision it is essential that you do not shut your eyes for a moment so as not to miss the target. Many have crashed into the targets with wide-open eyes. They will tell you what fun they had.

Thoughts? Was this an effective military strategy as well?

Having just finished a unit on Japanese warrior culture and imperialism, I would think most if not all pilots would've have gladly died for their country. And, it's hard to tell if was really effective. You lost a pilot, who most of the times missed or caused little damage.

Yeah, only 11% were successful
http://thefairjilt.com...
keithprosser
Posts: 1,929
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5/6/2016 9:52:03 AM
Posted: 7 months ago
You lost a pilot, who most of the times missed or caused little damage.
Japan had run out of trained pilots and decent planes. Kamikaze was a way to give under-trained pilots in poorly maintained aircraft some chance of causing damage. We note that such raw pilots were not even skilled enough to collide with something the size of a battleship in many cases.

I think Japanese miltary tradition made many Kamikaze pilots accept their orders, but I don't think many of them wanted to die. They were motivated by their discipline or the prospect of shame, and maybe by peer pressure, but I don't think love of the Emperor had much to do with it. That would be sheer propaganda.
j50wells
Posts: 345
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5/10/2016 8:39:06 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
It wasn't really a strategy, rather it was a psychological way of life. It was a belief system. To the Japanese, suicide for everyone's betterment was the deepest form of respect, courage, and love toward your family and friends. It's akin to you dying to protect your wife and children when a murderer is in your house. So the government didn't have to convince the pilots to be Kamikaze.
In truth, I would commit suicide to kill twenty of my enemy combatants if I thought our country was in danger. Most nationalistic men would. Consider the fact that crashing into an air craft carrier was painless, as instance death was inevitable.
Also remember that to many Americans, Normandy was a suicide invasion. So was Iwo Jima.
The mocking of Kamikaze's was really just a propaganda tool to make the Japanese look stupid. We had Kamikaze's on our side too. The parachuters who dropped into France behind enemy lines were also on a suicide mission. Luckily we broke through the German lines so that most of the parachuters made it out alive, but originally it was known that if we didn't break through enemy lines, they would all die.
Hayd
Posts: 4,022
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5/15/2016 4:35:51 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/6/2016 9:52:03 AM, keithprosser wrote:
You lost a pilot, who most of the times missed or caused little damage.
Japan had run out of trained pilots and decent planes. Kamikaze was a way to give under-trained pilots in poorly maintained aircraft some chance of causing damage. We note that such raw pilots were not even skilled enough to collide with something the size of a battleship in many cases.

I think Japanese miltary tradition made many Kamikaze pilots accept their orders, but I don't think many of them wanted to die. They were motivated by their discipline or the prospect of shame, and maybe by peer pressure, but I don't think love of the Emperor had much to do with it. That would be sheer propaganda.

Their emperor did have a lot to do with it, the emperor was revered as God's form on earth. I think that would have some impact...
JohnF.Kennedy
Posts: 19
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8/9/2016 1:22:53 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
I doubt they had to convince anyone. The Japanese people were highly dedicated to culture and honor, moreso the military.
I actually do not care at all about any refugees, I have said time and time again that Europes external borders should be maintained by autonomous 30mm grenade launchers firing air burst rounds.
DebaterEpic
Posts: 1
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9/9/2016 3:22:55 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
The Japanese officers asked individual pilots to be kamikaze. I believe that most would have said no, but with peer pressure they had to say yes. They also believed that being cowardly would bring dishonor to their family, and it was glorious to die for the emperor.
xus00HAY
Posts: 1,378
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10/4/2016 3:15:22 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At the end of the war there was not much difference between a dive bomber attack and a kamikaze mission.

To attack an American ship the jap would 1st have to get his airplane past the American fighters. He would probably get shot down trying to do this.
After getting past the fighters he would need to be lucky enough to not get hit by the flack the sailors were shooting at him, this is also unlikely.
So if he is making a dive on the ship ready to release his bomb, the bomb could miss, and he would have died in vain. So it seemed like a good idea to stay with the bomb all the way down and make sure it hits the ship.
OK, he may have released the bomb and got away form the ship, but after that the American fighters would chase him, so the chance of dropping a bomb and none of this other stuff not happening were about zero.