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Curious Sayings

brian_eggleston
Posts: 3,347
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8/19/2011 5:41:56 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
When I was a small boy I dropped my ice lolly and it got covered in dirt. My mum told me to pick it up and eat it and when I objected she said:

"We all eat a pound of muck before we die."

I remember being unimpressed by this and thinking of a doctor's report reading: Brian Eggleston, deceased. Cause of death: Eating a pound of muck.
Visit the burglars' bulletin board: http://www.break-in-news.com...
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,256
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8/19/2011 9:17:24 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

Not much point in hiring a Lawyer to draw up a Deed for a cake :)
mattrodstrom
Posts: 12,028
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8/19/2011 9:18:16 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
"I've got to see a man about a horse"

means: I Gotta Pee!!
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
Andromeda_Z
Posts: 4,151
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8/19/2011 4:56:28 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

I never understood this one either, you still have the cake. It's in your stomach.
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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8/19/2011 4:59:11 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 4:56:28 PM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

I never understood this one either, you still have the cake. It's in your stomach.

Its supposed to be 'you can't eat your cake and have it too' (which makes more sense) but somewhere along history it got switched.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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8/20/2011 11:53:44 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

I only understood this one a few months ago. It's because once you eat it, you no longer have it. I think.
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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8/20/2011 11:56:39 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/20/2011 11:53:44 AM, nonentity wrote:
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

I only understood this one a few months ago. It's because once you eat it, you no longer have it. I think.

And there's this one, a Russian adage, I understand a bit....'Granny (told fortunes and) said two things (— it will either rain or snow; it either will or will not).'

Hmm...it appears to mean that even with a knowledge of the future, effects, consequences, and succeeding actions remain unknown. Any thoughts?
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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8/20/2011 12:02:12 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/20/2011 11:56:39 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
At 8/20/2011 11:53:44 AM, nonentity wrote:
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

I only understood this one a few months ago. It's because once you eat it, you no longer have it. I think.

And there's this one, a Russian adage, I understand a bit....'Granny (told fortunes and) said two things (— it will either rain or snow; it either will or will not).'

Hmm...it appears to mean that even with a knowledge of the future, effects, consequences, and succeeding actions remain unknown. Any thoughts?

Can you say it in Russian? I'll ask my boyfriend to translate.
el-badgero
Posts: 1,045
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8/20/2011 12:02:14 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 9:18:16 AM, mattrodstrom wrote:
"I've got to see a man about a horse"

means: I Gotta Pee!!

not over here it doesn't... and it's also very often "a man about a dog" over here too.. it just means i gotta go.. meet a client.. that kinda thing.. it's generally said when you don't want to tell someone what you're going doing.. or.. if you were going seeing a man about a dog or a horse which'd be fairly commonplace over here too.. :P
DATCMOTO's moustache makes him look like an eejit...

edit: nah, i'm jealous... God's an eejit definitely though!
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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8/20/2011 12:13:16 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/20/2011 12:02:12 PM, nonentity wrote:
At 8/20/2011 11:56:39 AM, Man-is-good wrote:
At 8/20/2011 11:53:44 AM, nonentity wrote:
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

I only understood this one a few months ago. It's because once you eat it, you no longer have it. I think.

And there's this one, a Russian adage, I understand a bit....'Granny (told fortunes and) said two things (— it will either rain or snow; it either will or will not).'

Hmm...it appears to mean that even with a knowledge of the future, effects, consequences, and succeeding actions remain unknown. Any thoughts?

Can you say it in Russian? I'll ask my boyfriend to translate.

I can't. I tried to copy and paste the original Russian phrase but it soon became a mess of numbers and words....Sorry...
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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8/20/2011 12:26:00 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/20/2011 12:13:16 PM, Man-is-good wrote:

I can't. I tried to copy and paste the original Russian phrase but it soon became a mess of numbers and words....Sorry...

Hmm well if you are interested, print screen it or send me a link to it. :) Who knows if he'll even have the English vocabulary to translate it for me :p
Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
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8/20/2011 12:36:10 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 4:59:11 PM, 000ike wrote:
Its supposed to be 'you can't eat your cake and have it too' (which makes more sense) but somewhere along history it got switched.

Aaah, now I get it. I've never understood that saying.
medic0506
Posts: 13,450
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8/22/2011 10:04:56 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
"God never closes a door without opening a window"

I've heard this all my life but when I moved down south and say it, people look at me like I have three heads. Is it that hard to understand??
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
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8/22/2011 10:06:32 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/22/2011 10:04:56 PM, medic0506 wrote:
"God never closes a door without opening a window"

I've heard this all my life but when I moved down south and say it, people look at me like I have three heads. Is it that hard to understand??

You know what they say about God, Medic. "God works in mysterious ways".
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
medic0506
Posts: 13,450
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8/22/2011 10:06:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 5:41:56 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
When I was a small boy I dropped my ice lolly and it got covered in dirt. My mum told me to pick it up and eat it and when I objected she said:

"We all eat a pound of muck before we die."

I remember being unimpressed by this and thinking of a doctor's report reading: Brian Eggleston, deceased. Cause of death: Eating a pound of muck.

I always heard, "God made dirt and dirt don't hurt".
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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8/25/2011 9:36:29 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 8/19/2011 7:56:28 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
Another one is: "You can't have your cake and eat it."

Not much point in buying cake then, is there?

That expression somehow became reversed over the years. It means, "You can't eat your cake and still have it."
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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8/25/2011 9:46:51 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I once told a guy that a certain job "was a piece of cake." He was from Yugoslavia, with a PhD I believe, and had never heard that expression, so I explained it. It's not obvious. Thereafter, whenever something seemed easy, he would proclaim, "Eeze peeece of cake." Useful expression.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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8/25/2011 9:53:18 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I have a dictionary of Russian obscenities. (Doesn't everyone?) One of them translates to "March 19th." It is derived from a day in Moscow when the river ice breaks up. It dates from the days when horse manure accumulated on the ice all winter and was suddenly dumped in the river. It's roughly equivalent to "when the chickens come home to roost" but much better. Who cares if the chickens are roosting?