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Learn Computer Programming

Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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1/4/2012 8:52:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I want to learn computer programming but I have no idea where to start, so I have a few questions.

1. What is the most common language used by computer programers (I think it's something like C or C++)?

2. What are some good resources for a COMPLETE beginner to work with?
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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1/4/2012 9:07:05 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The language depends on what you want to do. There is C++, VisualBasic, perl, Python, Ruby, Java, JavaScript, php. What is your goal?
Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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1/4/2012 10:27:17 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
No freakin idea. Just learn how to write code to make programs. Obviously not as a real job, but just for some experimentation.
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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1/4/2012 10:56:44 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/4/2012 10:27:17 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
No freakin idea. Just learn how to write code to make programs. Obviously not as a real job, but just for some experimentation.

C and C++ are difficult but they may appeal to you if you are interested in learning how software manages RAM allocation or works directly with devices. They are the fasted languages (in terms of run time; the slowest to write in) and most versatile.

If you are interested in learning algorithms or you just have some ideas you want to try out, I recommend Python. It's easy to learn and it's fast to write programs in. You can write web pages in it (I think YouTube is written in Python) or desktop GUIs. You can also write text based console apps with it.

You should be able to use any language for free. Even MS's .NET languages are free (you pay for the development environment).

Don't think for a moment you can't turn it into a career though, if that's what you want. There is a lot of demand for programmers and employers are more interested in your skills than your official education.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

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Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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1/4/2012 11:08:33 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Start with LUA. It's good to learn basic syntax. It's very simple and easy to understand. I started with LUA and I can tell you, when I tried out C++, it was a lot easier to make the jump than when I had tried before.

A good place to test out your LUA skills is a game called Roblox, You make scripts, run them, and see what happens. Don't be turned off by the raving mob of small children that run the place.
royalpaladin
Posts: 22,357
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1/5/2012 9:18:10 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Start with Java. I began learning it last year for AP Comp. Sci. and have continued to study it this year in my C.S. classes in college. Java is very easy to learn and is much more strict with its syntax than C and C++ are, which is good because it allows one to understand the rules more easily.

Use a compiler like BlueJ or a Project Environment like Eclipse to write your code.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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1/5/2012 5:59:12 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/5/2012 9:18:10 AM, royalpaladin wrote:
Start with Java. I began learning it last year for AP Comp. Sci. and have continued to study it this year in my C.S. classes in college. Java is very easy to learn and is much more strict with its syntax than C and C++ are, which is good because it allows one to understand the rules more easily.

Use a compiler like BlueJ or a Project Environment like Eclipse to write your code.

Java would be the last language I would recommend. It's a good language however the tools are difficult to work with. It was a real bummer for me. Maybe it would have been easier if I learned it it school though.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
royalpaladin
Posts: 22,357
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1/5/2012 6:01:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/5/2012 5:59:12 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/5/2012 9:18:10 AM, royalpaladin wrote:
Start with Java. I began learning it last year for AP Comp. Sci. and have continued to study it this year in my C.S. classes in college. Java is very easy to learn and is much more strict with its syntax than C and C++ are, which is good because it allows one to understand the rules more easily.

Use a compiler like BlueJ or a Project Environment like Eclipse to write your code.

Java would be the last language I would recommend. It's a good language however the tools are difficult to work with. It was a real bummer for me. Maybe it would have been easier if I learned it it school though.

What have you been using?

Learning it now would be practical if you are planning to pursue a C.S. degree. I am currently enrolled in courses that are designed for sophomores (I am a freshman), and all of them use Java, which I learned in the AP class.
Lord_Logic
Posts: 81
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1/5/2012 6:02:47 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/5/2012 5:59:12 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/5/2012 9:18:10 AM, royalpaladin wrote:
Start with Java. I began learning it last year for AP Comp. Sci. and have continued to study it this year in my C.S. classes in college. Java is very easy to learn and is much more strict with its syntax than C and C++ are, which is good because it allows one to understand the rules more easily.

Use a compiler like BlueJ or a Project Environment like Eclipse to write your code.

Java would be the last language I would recommend. It's a good language however the tools are difficult to work with. It was a real bummer for me. Maybe it would have been easier if I learned it it school though.

I would agree. My friend started with Python. It is supposed to be a fairly easy language to master in for beginners and intermediates. However, my friend stated that computer programming gets boring after a few months/years.
Meet Ike, your worst enemy...or second...or third...or the rank after your mother...
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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1/5/2012 11:53:24 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/5/2012 6:01:10 PM, royalpaladin wrote:
At 1/5/2012 5:59:12 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/5/2012 9:18:10 AM, royalpaladin wrote:
Start with Java. I began learning it last year for AP Comp. Sci. and have continued to study it this year in my C.S. classes in college. Java is very easy to learn and is much more strict with its syntax than C and C++ are, which is good because it allows one to understand the rules more easily.

Use a compiler like BlueJ or a Project Environment like Eclipse to write your code.

Java would be the last language I would recommend. It's a good language however the tools are difficult to work with. It was a real bummer for me. Maybe it would have been easier if I learned it it school though.

What have you been using?

Learning it now would be practical if you are planning to pursue a C.S. degree. I am currently enrolled in courses that are designed for sophomores (I am a freshman), and all of them use Java, which I learned in the AP class.

I think I tried to learn all the ancillary technologies to fast (Hibernate, JSP, Maverick, Ant, Servlets, Tomcat, Struts). I couldn't figure out how to set up Eclipse for all this stuff. When I was trying to figure it out online, I learned that some people were paying $60 for something called MyEclipse that was supposed to be a preconfigured version of Eclipse. That was when I gave up. I had been studying it for about a year.

Anyway, Java is pretty good to know if you are in the industry - lots of jobs. However, there seems to be a push to JVM based languages like Groovy and Scala. People want their JVM but they want to program in implicitly typed languages because it's easier. That's my impression anyway.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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1/5/2012 11:58:14 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 1/5/2012 6:02:47 PM, Lord_Logic wrote:
At 1/5/2012 5:59:12 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 1/5/2012 9:18:10 AM, royalpaladin wrote:
Start with Java. I began learning it last year for AP Comp. Sci. and have continued to study it this year in my C.S. classes in college. Java is very easy to learn and is much more strict with its syntax than C and C++ are, which is good because it allows one to understand the rules more easily.

Use a compiler like BlueJ or a Project Environment like Eclipse to write your code.

Java would be the last language I would recommend. It's a good language however the tools are difficult to work with. It was a real bummer for me. Maybe it would have been easier if I learned it it school though.

I would agree. My friend started with Python. It is supposed to be a fairly easy language to master in for beginners and intermediates. However, my friend stated that computer programming gets boring after a few months/years.

It depends on who you are. It can be very addictive some many people.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
marcuscato
Posts: 738
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1/7/2012 12:33:40 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Theres something called Turtle logo, its really easy, i learnt it in the 3rd grade, you should be able to master it quickly, it will give u a feel of thinking involved in programming.
Then u can try java-bluej or C-(turboC)
These will take more time but you can do a lot more things with them.