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Ahmadinejad wins re-election

JBlake
Posts: 4,634
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6/13/2009 9:40:09 AM
Posted: 7 years ago
Ahmadinejad has been declared the winner of the 2009 Iranian election despite allegations of massive vote fraud.

Mousavi has called the election results a "charade" and will almost certainly appeal to the Guardian Council for a re-do of the election.

Thoughts?
brian_eggleston
Posts: 3,347
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6/13/2009 10:20:49 AM
Posted: 7 years ago
Ahmadinejad is often criticised in the West and also by the educated, urban elite of Tehran. However, the voters in the provinces of Iran overwelhmingly support him and voted for him accordingly.

We may not like it, but the domestic policies of Ahmadinejad appeal to the rural proletariat and their votes should hold equal weight to those of the more "enlightened".

Ahmadinejad's re-election is not great news for the international community but we must respect the democratic process, even when it doesn't produce the desired results.

In the final analysis, there are voting irregularities in most democracies - let's not forget the George W / Jebb Bush outrage in Florida not so long ago.
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Brock_Meyer
Posts: 13
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6/13/2009 11:03:51 AM
Posted: 7 years ago
At the end of the day, democratic elections are simply marionettes dancing around on a stage and are designed to give an air of legitimacy to an incumbent or incoming administration. They mean very little for the future direction of a nation for the simple reason that radical change in politics is not possible.

Just as in the United States, the office of the Presidency in Iran is not the highest office. The Ayatollah controls international relations, nuclear endeavors, military forces, religious affairs, and so on. In other words, the only job of the President is to micromanage the economy, and not to lead the nation as we would typically think. The same is true in the United States, where the President is the puppet of Wall Street and large institutions. I guess we might call Wall Street and these large institutions (like the Fed) "religious institutions" similar to the Ayatollah, because of America's quasi-religious obsession with money.
Volkov
Posts: 9,765
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6/13/2009 12:40:21 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
Ahmadinejad won because he is a populist, and populists appeal to the poor, uneducated voting masses. He also appealed to the nationalists, the religious and the conservative voters of the country. It is just like politics in the West, with some slight twists.
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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6/14/2009 8:28:30 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
I don't believe any election is "legitimate."

As for the fraud part, I wouldn't put it past any party ^_^.
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Volkov
Posts: 9,765
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6/14/2009 8:57:52 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
I have to agree with wjm, there was probably fraud. I think Ahmadinejad would have won anyways, or at least have some plurality of the vote, but not 64%. This man has wrecked the Iranian economy and there were huge, huge rallies for Mousavi, and the fact that there is a good proportion of Iranians saying they're skeptical about the results is proof that there is considerable support. Ahmadinejad also won in Mousavi heartland apparently, something you think would be nearly impossible during such a heavy campaign by Mousavi.

Does it really matter though? The Ayatollah and the Guardian Council (all those mullahs) would veto any major social and foreign policy legislation passed by a reformist President. The power really lies with them.
JBlake
Posts: 4,634
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6/14/2009 9:50:50 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
I doubt they would veto too heavily. Mousavi wanted to better relations with the west, but he is by no means pro-west. He still intended on continuing the nuclear program.

Most of the reforms are toward privatization of industry, something that every Iranian year plan has included. His reforms weren't so radical that the Ayatollah and the Guardian Council would have been significantly at odds with him. You must also remember that he served as Prime Minister in the 1980s (when the Ayatollah and GC also were in control).

His economic policy was more in line with the higher-ups than Ahmadenijad's, but his stance on relations with the west was not.

It should be quite interesting to see how this all plays out. Mousavi is demanding the election be annulled, which will probably result in more violence in the streets.

=====

I agree that elections are primarily meant to provide legitimacy to a government. When the public believes they have come to power illegitimately (i.e. massive vote fraud) then they have every right to oppose said government. Why would you deny them their right to question the legitimacy of such a government?
Volkov
Posts: 9,765
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6/15/2009 1:38:47 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
They actually managed to file the appeal, and it was actually accepted! At least thats what it says, even though I can't find a story specifically about it.

"Shots were fired in central Tehran on Monday after tens of thousands of Iranians defied a government order and gathered downtown, hours after the country's supreme leader ordered an investigation into allegations of fraud in the presidential election."

http://www.cbc.ca...