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the many pains of writing a book

Wtnjetro
Posts: 39
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6/5/2013 9:50:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm writing a book critiquing the atheist arguments. I started out learning how to write really good in 1996 after trying to get a job in Accounting (which I have a degree in) and breaking into learning some computer languages. my biggest challenges were learning to reduce what I had down to manageable scale because every time I'd see something new to add to a chapter I'd try to shoehorn it in and make everything much too cumbersone. Plus I had a nasty habit of starting a lot of sentences with"But." I had to get over that real quick

I joined a local writers group about 2003 named Writers on the Rock. I got published in their anthologies for at least two years and then the group died off (literally as many members were kinda old). but at least I got some improvement on my writing and two publications under my belt.

then I got published in Lutheran Science newsletters and later the Creation Research Quarterly. so I have built my writing resume up from nothing to something. As always I am motivated by those people who don't have their act together. Here's something I wrote years ago which was strongly influenced by an ex-friend

Robert. He was the embodiment of crudeness, the antithesis of conventional human appearance. One might be tempted to say he looks like a fine upstanding citizen, but the embroidery of tatoos upon his body would most likely wrest from him any remaining dignity he might have accumulated over the years. Unfortunately his looks were followed by actions in kind.
Many acquaintances were amazed at his ability to tweak whatever meaning he could out of his miserable existence by engaging in many an accidental mishap or dangerous exploit. Often he would tell stories of his fist-fights with his wife and his desires to commit suicide, events immediately followed by tales of marital bliss and reaffirmations of affections. Other times Robert would tell of being mistakenly arrested for shoplifting, having a volley of verbal insults with a checkout lady, and going into panic attacks at discrepancies in his bank statement he was sure had been the bank"s fault. His life was a morass of chaos and bitterness topped with ever so slight a crust of humanity.
Thus, Robert achieved quite a reputation among his contemporaries, a reputation of running into trouble, continuously, much as a dog chases his tail but never catches it. His reputation was one of self-destruction. There are people who continually trip over their own shoestrings. There are others who leave their shoestrings untied and then trip over them. Robert approached life much like a man who fails to put shoestrings in his shoes and then wonders why his shoes do not stay on his feet. Such was the pitiful life he had built.
Janet. She was a young local woman of desperation, a woman who found herself journeying down a rocky road of marriage. Her husband loved her but she, spoiled by years of bounty, could not realize it. She soon found herself out shopping for new meat and before long set her sights on Robert, an act appropriate since Robert himself was sinking aboard his own Titanic-like marriage. She needed a warm body in bed with her and he was that body. He, of course, not wanting to pass up a free thing, desired her although his love was never genuine. She was merely another conquest, another lonely heart he could mesmerize with his shallow offers of companionship. Janet suspected that by taking up with Robert she was doing the equivalent of forsaking a fresh can of tuna for a rotting Carp, but she was blind-stinking drunk with love. Robert and Janet were destined to become a pair.
Soon Robert and Janet found themselves divorced, kicked out of the nest they had previously occupied. They were now anchored together, for good, like two shoddily built ships aboard a sea of ignorance. Janet often had doubts about attaching herself to Robert, but her time of rekindling the fire in her prior marriage had disappeared. She had made her decision and intended to make the best of it. "Pigs must wallow in muck and so must I," she thought. Robert, of course, was abysmally ignorant of any feelings whether toward his previous wife or Janet. He was merely along for the ride.
I have lost contact with Robert and Janet. I hear they are living in some destitute neighborhood where a poorly constructed pastiche of houses that resemble remnants of Picasso"s worst offerings jockey for position with broken pavement and cramped parking.
I am told that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. It stands to reason that there is some corner of the fence where the grass is dead or decaying. That corner belongs to Robert and Janet. Every rainbow has its pot of gold and I"m sure they have their"s, although, most certainly it is fool"s gold. I am comfortable with them keeping their pot of gold near their secluded corner of the universe. So much the better for my grass.
Author of the book The Vast Wastelands of Unbelief published by Tate Publishing, frequent author of articles at www.lutheranscience.org
DakotaKrafick
Posts: 1,517
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6/6/2013 3:05:50 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/5/2013 9:50:09 PM, Wtnjetro wrote:
I'm writing a book critiquing the atheist arguments. I started out learning how to write really good in 1996 after trying to get a job in Accounting (which I have a degree in) and breaking into learning some computer languages. my biggest challenges were learning to reduce what I had down to manageable scale because every time I'd see something new to add to a chapter I'd try to shoehorn it in and make everything much too cumbersone. Plus I had a nasty habit of starting a lot of sentences with"But." I had to get over that real quick

I joined a local writers group about 2003 named Writers on the Rock. I got published in their anthologies for at least two years and then the group died off (literally as many members were kinda old). but at least I got some improvement on my writing and two publications under my belt.

then I got published in Lutheran Science newsletters and later the Creation Research Quarterly. so I have built my writing resume up from nothing to something. As always I am motivated by those people who don't have their act together. Here's something I wrote years ago which was strongly influenced by an ex-friend

Robert. He was the embodiment of crudeness, the antithesis of conventional human appearance. One might be tempted to say he looks like a fine upstanding citizen, but the embroidery of tatoos upon his body would most likely wrest from him any remaining dignity he might have accumulated over the years. Unfortunately his looks were followed by actions in kind.
Many acquaintances were amazed at his ability to tweak whatever meaning he could out of his miserable existence by engaging in many an accidental mishap or dangerous exploit. Often he would tell stories of his fist-fights with his wife and his desires to commit suicide, events immediately followed by tales of marital bliss and reaffirmations of affections. Other times Robert would tell of being mistakenly arrested for shoplifting, having a volley of verbal insults with a checkout lady, and going into panic attacks at discrepancies in his bank statement he was sure had been the bank"s fault. His life was a morass of chaos and bitterness topped with ever so slight a crust of humanity.
Thus, Robert achieved quite a reputation among his contemporaries, a reputation of running into trouble, continuously, much as a dog chases his tail but never catches it. His reputation was one of self-destruction. There are people who continually trip over their own shoestrings. There are others who leave their shoestrings untied and then trip over them. Robert approached life much like a man who fails to put shoestrings in his shoes and then wonders why his shoes do not stay on his feet. Such was the pitiful life he had built.
Janet. She was a young local woman of desperation, a woman who found herself journeying down a rocky road of marriage. Her husband loved her but she, spoiled by years of bounty, could not realize it. She soon found herself out shopping for new meat and before long set her sights on Robert, an act appropriate since Robert himself was sinking aboard his own Titanic-like marriage. She needed a warm body in bed with her and he was that body. He, of course, not wanting to pass up a free thing, desired her although his love was never genuine. She was merely another conquest, another lonely heart he could mesmerize with his shallow offers of companionship. Janet suspected that by taking up with Robert she was doing the equivalent of forsaking a fresh can of tuna for a rotting Carp, but she was blind-stinking drunk with love. Robert and Janet were destined to become a pair.
Soon Robert and Janet found themselves divorced, kicked out of the nest they had previously occupied. They were now anchored together, for good, like two shoddily built ships aboard a sea of ignorance. Janet often had doubts about attaching herself to Robert, but her time of rekindling the fire in her prior marriage had disappeared. She had made her decision and intended to make the best of it. "Pigs must wallow in muck and so must I," she thought. Robert, of course, was abysmally ignorant of any feelings whether toward his previous wife or Janet. He was merely along for the ride.
I have lost contact with Robert and Janet. I hear they are living in some destitute neighborhood where a poorly constructed pastiche of houses that resemble remnants of Picasso"s worst offerings jockey for position with broken pavement and cramped parking.
I am told that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. It stands to reason that there is some corner of the fence where the grass is dead or decaying. That corner belongs to Robert and Janet. Every rainbow has its pot of gold and I"m sure they have their"s, although, most certainly it is fool"s gold. I am comfortable with them keeping their pot of gold near their secluded corner of the universe. So much the better for my grass.

You've been learning how to write "really good" for over fifteen years now and you still don't know the difference between an adjective and an adverb?
MassiveDump
Posts: 3,423
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6/6/2013 3:07:53 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 3:05:50 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/5/2013 9:50:09 PM, Wtnjetro wrote:
I'm writing a book critiquing the atheist arguments. I started out learning how to write really goodly in 1996 after trying to get a job in Accounting (which I have a degree in) and breaking into learning some computer languages. my biggest challenges were learning to reduce what I had down to manageable scale because every time I'd see something new to add to a chapter I'd try to shoehorn it in and make everything much too cumbersone. Plus I had a nasty habit of starting a lot of sentences with"But." I had to get over that real quick

I joined a local writers group about 2003 named Writers on the Rock. I got published in their anthologies for at least two years and then the group died off (literally as many members were kinda old). but at least I got some improvement on my writing and two publications under my belt.

then I got published in Lutheran Science newsletters and later the Creation Research Quarterly. so I have built my writing resume up from nothing to something. As always I am motivated by those people who don't have their act together. Here's something I wrote years ago which was strongly influenced by an ex-friend

Robert. He was the embodiment of crudeness, the antithesis of conventional human appearance. One might be tempted to say he looks like a fine upstanding citizen, but the embroidery of tatoos upon his body would most likely wrest from him any remaining dignity he might have accumulated over the years. Unfortunately his looks were followed by actions in kind.
Many acquaintances were amazed at his ability to tweak whatever meaning he could out of his miserable existence by engaging in many an accidental mishap or dangerous exploit. Often he would tell stories of his fist-fights with his wife and his desires to commit suicide, events immediately followed by tales of marital bliss and reaffirmations of affections. Other times Robert would tell of being mistakenly arrested for shoplifting, having a volley of verbal insults with a checkout lady, and going into panic attacks at discrepancies in his bank statement he was sure had been the bank"s fault. His life was a morass of chaos and bitterness topped with ever so slight a crust of humanity.
Thus, Robert achieved quite a reputation among his contemporaries, a reputation of running into trouble, continuously, much as a dog chases his tail but never catches it. His reputation was one of self-destruction. There are people who continually trip over their own shoestrings. There are others who leave their shoestrings untied and then trip over them. Robert approached life much like a man who fails to put shoestrings in his shoes and then wonders why his shoes do not stay on his feet. Such was the pitiful life he had built.
Janet. She was a young local woman of desperation, a woman who found herself journeying down a rocky road of marriage. Her husband loved her but she, spoiled by years of bounty, could not realize it. She soon found herself out shopping for new meat and before long set her sights on Robert, an act appropriate since Robert himself was sinking aboard his own Titanic-like marriage. She needed a warm body in bed with her and he was that body. He, of course, not wanting to pass up a free thing, desired her although his love was never genuine. She was merely another conquest, another lonely heart he could mesmerize with his shallow offers of companionship. Janet suspected that by taking up with Robert she was doing the equivalent of forsaking a fresh can of tuna for a rotting Carp, but she was blind-stinking drunk with love. Robert and Janet were destined to become a pair.
Soon Robert and Janet found themselves divorced, kicked out of the nest they had previously occupied. They were now anchored together, for good, like two shoddily built ships aboard a sea of ignorance. Janet often had doubts about attaching herself to Robert, but her time of rekindling the fire in her prior marriage had disappeared. She had made her decision and intended to make the best of it. "Pigs must wallow in muck and so must I," she thought. Robert, of course, was abysmally ignorant of any feelings whether toward his previous wife or Janet. He was merely along for the ride.
I have lost contact with Robert and Janet. I hear they are living in some destitute neighborhood where a poorly constructed pastiche of houses that resemble remnants of Picasso"s worst offerings jockey for position with broken pavement and cramped parking.
I am told that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. It stands to reason that there is some corner of the fence where the grass is dead or decaying. That corner belongs to Robert and Janet. Every rainbow has its pot of gold and I"m sure they have their"s, although, most certainly it is fool"s gold. I am comfortable with them keeping their pot of gold near their secluded corner of the universe. So much the better for my grass.

You've been learning how to write "really good" for over fifteen years now and you still don't know the difference between an adjective and an adverb?

There I fixed it are you happy?
DakotaKrafick
Posts: 1,517
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6/6/2013 3:11:42 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 3:07:53 PM, MassiveDump wrote:
At 6/6/2013 3:05:50 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/5/2013 9:50:09 PM, Wtnjetro wrote:
I'm writing a book critiquing the atheist arguments. I started out learning how to write really goodly in 1996 after trying to get a job in Accounting (which I have a degree in) and breaking into learning some computer languages. my biggest challenges were learning to reduce what I had down to manageable scale because every time I'd see something new to add to a chapter I'd try to shoehorn it in and make everything much too cumbersone. Plus I had a nasty habit of starting a lot of sentences with"But." I had to get over that real quick

I joined a local writers group about 2003 named Writers on the Rock. I got published in their anthologies for at least two years and then the group died off (literally as many members were kinda old). but at least I got some improvement on my writing and two publications under my belt.

then I got published in Lutheran Science newsletters and later the Creation Research Quarterly. so I have built my writing resume up from nothing to something. As always I am motivated by those people who don't have their act together. Here's something I wrote years ago which was strongly influenced by an ex-friend

Robert. He was the embodiment of crudeness, the antithesis of conventional human appearance. One might be tempted to say he looks like a fine upstanding citizen, but the embroidery of tatoos upon his body would most likely wrest from him any remaining dignity he might have accumulated over the years. Unfortunately his looks were followed by actions in kind.
Many acquaintances were amazed at his ability to tweak whatever meaning he could out of his miserable existence by engaging in many an accidental mishap or dangerous exploit. Often he would tell stories of his fist-fights with his wife and his desires to commit suicide, events immediately followed by tales of marital bliss and reaffirmations of affections. Other times Robert would tell of being mistakenly arrested for shoplifting, having a volley of verbal insults with a checkout lady, and going into panic attacks at discrepancies in his bank statement he was sure had been the bank"s fault. His life was a morass of chaos and bitterness topped with ever so slight a crust of humanity.
Thus, Robert achieved quite a reputation among his contemporaries, a reputation of running into trouble, continuously, much as a dog chases his tail but never catches it. His reputation was one of self-destruction. There are people who continually trip over their own shoestrings. There are others who leave their shoestrings untied and then trip over them. Robert approached life much like a man who fails to put shoestrings in his shoes and then wonders why his shoes do not stay on his feet. Such was the pitiful life he had built.
Janet. She was a young local woman of desperation, a woman who found herself journeying down a rocky road of marriage. Her husband loved her but she, spoiled by years of bounty, could not realize it. She soon found herself out shopping for new meat and before long set her sights on Robert, an act appropriate since Robert himself was sinking aboard his own Titanic-like marriage. She needed a warm body in bed with her and he was that body. He, of course, not wanting to pass up a free thing, desired her although his love was never genuine. She was merely another conquest, another lonely heart he could mesmerize with his shallow offers of companionship. Janet suspected that by taking up with Robert she was doing the equivalent of forsaking a fresh can of tuna for a rotting Carp, but she was blind-stinking drunk with love. Robert and Janet were destined to become a pair.
Soon Robert and Janet found themselves divorced, kicked out of the nest they had previously occupied. They were now anchored together, for good, like two shoddily built ships aboard a sea of ignorance. Janet often had doubts about attaching herself to Robert, but her time of rekindling the fire in her prior marriage had disappeared. She had made her decision and intended to make the best of it. "Pigs must wallow in muck and so must I," she thought. Robert, of course, was abysmally ignorant of any feelings whether toward his previous wife or Janet. He was merely along for the ride.
I have lost contact with Robert and Janet. I hear they are living in some destitute neighborhood where a poorly constructed pastiche of houses that resemble remnants of Picasso"s worst offerings jockey for position with broken pavement and cramped parking.
I am told that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. It stands to reason that there is some corner of the fence where the grass is dead or decaying. That corner belongs to Robert and Janet. Every rainbow has its pot of gold and I"m sure they have their"s, although, most certainly it is fool"s gold. I am comfortable with them keeping their pot of gold near their secluded corner of the universe. So much the better for my grass.

You've been learning how to write "really good" for over fifteen years now and you still don't know the difference between an adjective and an adverb?

There I fixed it are you happy?

That was a run-on sentence, so no. I'm not happy.
MassiveDump
Posts: 3,423
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6/6/2013 3:26:49 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 3:11:42 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/6/2013 3:07:53 PM, MassiveDump wrote:
At 6/6/2013 3:05:50 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/5/2013 9:50:09 PM, Wtnjetro wrote:
I'm writing a book critiquing the atheist arguments. I started out learning how to write really goodly in 1996 after trying to get a job in Accounting (which I have a degree in) and breaking into learning some computer languages. my biggest challenges were learning to reduce what I had down to manageable scale because every time I'd see something new to add to a chapter I'd try to shoehorn it in and make everything much too cumbersone. Plus I had a nasty habit of starting a lot of sentences with"But." I had to get over that real quick

I joined a local writers group about 2003 named Writers on the Rock. I got published in their anthologies for at least two years and then the group died off (literally as many members were kinda old). but at least I got some improvement on my writing and two publications under my belt.

then I got published in Lutheran Science newsletters and later the Creation Research Quarterly. so I have built my writing resume up from nothing to something. As always I am motivated by those people who don't have their act together. Here's something I wrote years ago which was strongly influenced by an ex-friend

Robert. He was the embodiment of crudeness, the antithesis of conventional human appearance. One might be tempted to say he looks like a fine upstanding citizen, but the embroidery of tatoos upon his body would most likely wrest from him any remaining dignity he might have accumulated over the years. Unfortunately his looks were followed by actions in kind.
Many acquaintances were amazed at his ability to tweak whatever meaning he could out of his miserable existence by engaging in many an accidental mishap or dangerous exploit. Often he would tell stories of his fist-fights with his wife and his desires to commit suicide, events immediately followed by tales of marital bliss and reaffirmations of affections. Other times Robert would tell of being mistakenly arrested for shoplifting, having a volley of verbal insults with a checkout lady, and going into panic attacks at discrepancies in his bank statement he was sure had been the bank"s fault. His life was a morass of chaos and bitterness topped with ever so slight a crust of humanity.
Thus, Robert achieved quite a reputation among his contemporaries, a reputation of running into trouble, continuously, much as a dog chases his tail but never catches it. His reputation was one of self-destruction. There are people who continually trip over their own shoestrings. There are others who leave their shoestrings untied and then trip over them. Robert approached life much like a man who fails to put shoestrings in his shoes and then wonders why his shoes do not stay on his feet. Such was the pitiful life he had built.
Janet. She was a young local woman of desperation, a woman who found herself journeying down a rocky road of marriage. Her husband loved her but she, spoiled by years of bounty, could not realize it. She soon found herself out shopping for new meat and before long set her sights on Robert, an act appropriate since Robert himself was sinking aboard his own Titanic-like marriage. She needed a warm body in bed with her and he was that body. He, of course, not wanting to pass up a free thing, desired her although his love was never genuine. She was merely another conquest, another lonely heart he could mesmerize with his shallow offers of companionship. Janet suspected that by taking up with Robert she was doing the equivalent of forsaking a fresh can of tuna for a rotting Carp, but she was blind-stinking drunk with love. Robert and Janet were destined to become a pair.
Soon Robert and Janet found themselves divorced, kicked out of the nest they had previously occupied. They were now anchored together, for good, like two shoddily built ships aboard a sea of ignorance. Janet often had doubts about attaching herself to Robert, but her time of rekindling the fire in her prior marriage had disappeared. She had made her decision and intended to make the best of it. "Pigs must wallow in muck and so must I," she thought. Robert, of course, was abysmally ignorant of any feelings whether toward his previous wife or Janet. He was merely along for the ride.
I have lost contact with Robert and Janet. I hear they are living in some destitute neighborhood where a poorly constructed pastiche of houses that resemble remnants of Picasso"s worst offerings jockey for position with broken pavement and cramped parking.
I am told that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. It stands to reason that there is some corner of the fence where the grass is dead or decaying. That corner belongs to Robert and Janet. Every rainbow has its pot of gold and I"m sure they have their"s, although, most certainly it is fool"s gold. I am comfortable with them keeping their pot of gold near their secluded corner of the universe. So much the better for my grass.

You've been learning how to write "really good" for over fifteen years now and you still don't know the difference between an adjective and an adverb?

There I fixed it are you happy?

That was a run-on sentence, so no. I'm not happy.

I'd rather have a run-on than a fragment if you catch my drift.
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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6/6/2013 3:28:49 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 3:05:50 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/5/2013 9:50:09 PM, Wtnjetro wrote:
I'm writing a book critiquing the atheist arguments. I started out learning how to write really good in 1996 after trying to get a job in Accounting (which I have a degree in) and breaking into learning some computer languages. my biggest challenges were learning to reduce what I had down to manageable scale because every time I'd see something new to add to a chapter I'd try to shoehorn it in and make everything much too cumbersone. Plus I had a nasty habit of starting a lot of sentences with"But." I had to get over that real quick

I joined a local writers group about 2003 named Writers on the Rock. I got published in their anthologies for at least two years and then the group died off (literally as many members were kinda old). but at least I got some improvement on my writing and two publications under my belt.

then I got published in Lutheran Science newsletters and later the Creation Research Quarterly. so I have built my writing resume up from nothing to something. As always I am motivated by those people who don't have their act together. Here's something I wrote years ago which was strongly influenced by an ex-friend

Robert. He was the embodiment of crudeness, the antithesis of conventional human appearance. One might be tempted to say he looks like a fine upstanding citizen, but the embroidery of tatoos upon his body would most likely wrest from him any remaining dignity he might have accumulated over the years. Unfortunately his looks were followed by actions in kind.
Many acquaintances were amazed at his ability to tweak whatever meaning he could out of his miserable existence by engaging in many an accidental mishap or dangerous exploit. Often he would tell stories of his fist-fights with his wife and his desires to commit suicide, events immediately followed by tales of marital bliss and reaffirmations of affections. Other times Robert would tell of being mistakenly arrested for shoplifting, having a volley of verbal insults with a checkout lady, and going into panic attacks at discrepancies in his bank statement he was sure had been the bank"s fault. His life was a morass of chaos and bitterness topped with ever so slight a crust of humanity.
Thus, Robert achieved quite a reputation among his contemporaries, a reputation of running into trouble, continuously, much as a dog chases his tail but never catches it. His reputation was one of self-destruction. There are people who continually trip over their own shoestrings. There are others who leave their shoestrings untied and then trip over them. Robert approached life much like a man who fails to put shoestrings in his shoes and then wonders why his shoes do not stay on his feet. Such was the pitiful life he had built.
Janet. She was a young local woman of desperation, a woman who found herself journeying down a rocky road of marriage. Her husband loved her but she, spoiled by years of bounty, could not realize it. She soon found herself out shopping for new meat and before long set her sights on Robert, an act appropriate since Robert himself was sinking aboard his own Titanic-like marriage. She needed a warm body in bed with her and he was that body. He, of course, not wanting to pass up a free thing, desired her although his love was never genuine. She was merely another conquest, another lonely heart he could mesmerize with his shallow offers of companionship. Janet suspected that by taking up with Robert she was doing the equivalent of forsaking a fresh can of tuna for a rotting Carp, but she was blind-stinking drunk with love. Robert and Janet were destined to become a pair.
Soon Robert and Janet found themselves divorced, kicked out of the nest they had previously occupied. They were now anchored together, for good, like two shoddily built ships aboard a sea of ignorance. Janet often had doubts about attaching herself to Robert, but her time of rekindling the fire in her prior marriage had disappeared. She had made her decision and intended to make the best of it. "Pigs must wallow in muck and so must I," she thought. Robert, of course, was abysmally ignorant of any feelings whether toward his previous wife or Janet. He was merely along for the ride.
I have lost contact with Robert and Janet. I hear they are living in some destitute neighborhood where a poorly constructed pastiche of houses that resemble remnants of Picasso"s worst offerings jockey for position with broken pavement and cramped parking.
I am told that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. It stands to reason that there is some corner of the fence where the grass is dead or decaying. That corner belongs to Robert and Janet. Every rainbow has its pot of gold and I"m sure they have their"s, although, most certainly it is fool"s gold. I am comfortable with them keeping their pot of gold near their secluded corner of the universe. So much the better for my grass.

You've been learning how to write "really good" for over fifteen years now and you still don't know the difference between an adjective and an adverb?

RIP, my sides.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
Wtnjetro
Posts: 39
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6/6/2013 5:38:48 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
all I can say is oooops..... how embarrassing...
guess I wasn't proofreading my intro post well enough.
Author of the book The Vast Wastelands of Unbelief published by Tate Publishing, frequent author of articles at www.lutheranscience.org
Wnope
Posts: 6,924
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6/6/2013 5:40:55 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 5:38:48 PM, Wtnjetro wrote:
all I can say is oooops..... how embarrassing...
guess I wasn't proofreading my intro post well enough.

Not the greatest of faults on an online forum.