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Physics question.

Koopin
Posts: 12,090
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5/6/2010 8:32:02 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
I am sure the answer is really obvious, but no one can tell me exactly why/how.

Can someone explain this in details.
kfc
SportsGuru
Posts: 1,648
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5/6/2010 8:44:15 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
Granted, I'm not a physics genius, but here's my guess.

When you are pushing against yourself, not only do the muscles in you arms move, but your body naturally tenses up, including whatever area you are pushing on. This is the extra force in the opposite direction that you gain that causes you to not move when you push on yourself, but do move when you friend does. If you had unlimited strength, your tensing muscles would ALSO have unlimited strength, thus garnering the same results.
studentathletechristian8
Posts: 5,810
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5/6/2010 8:46:49 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:44:15 PM, SportsGuru wrote:
Granted, I'm not a physics genius, but here's my guess.

When you are pushing against yourself, not only do the muscles in you arms move, but your body naturally tenses up, including whatever area you are pushing on. This is the extra force in the opposite direction that you gain that causes you to not move when you push on yourself, but do move when you friend does. If you had unlimited strength, your tensing muscles would ALSO have unlimited strength, thus garnering the same results.

I'm taking physics, and that makes sense. Also, when you were pushing against yourself, you need to realize that the you are naturally exerting less net force than the guy who pushed you from "outside."

It's like trying to pinch yourself or make yourself tickle - doesn't really work until an outsider does it.
Koopin
Posts: 12,090
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5/6/2010 8:49:07 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:44:15 PM, SportsGuru wrote:
Granted, I'm not a physics genius, but here's my guess.

When you are pushing against yourself, not only do the muscles in you arms move, but your body naturally tenses up, including whatever area you are pushing on. This is the extra force in the opposite direction that you gain that causes you to not move when you push on yourself, but do move when you friend does. If you had unlimited strength, your tensing muscles would ALSO have unlimited strength, thus garnering the same results.

Interesting theory.
kfc
studentathletechristian8
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5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.
Koopin
Posts: 12,090
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5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?
kfc
BellumQuodPacis
Posts: 1,646
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5/6/2010 8:54:12 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
Also, you cant lean in to yourself. Your friend was able to move you because he leaned in to you. It is impossible to lean into yourself.
studentathletechristian8
Posts: 5,810
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5/6/2010 8:55:15 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?

Newton's Third Law? Inertia? Net force? Magnitude? Exactly what would you like defined?
BellumQuodPacis
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5/6/2010 8:59:28 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?

The Relative Kinetic Energy theory is what i explained.
Koopin
Posts: 12,090
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5/6/2010 8:59:56 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:55:15 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?

Newton's Third Law? Inertia? Net force? Magnitude? Exactly what would you like defined?

Simply why would I not be able to push myself back with my own force.
kfc
studentathletechristian8
Posts: 5,810
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5/6/2010 9:06:36 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:59:56 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:55:15 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?

Newton's Third Law? Inertia? Net force? Magnitude? Exactly what would you like defined?

Simply why would I not be able to push myself back with my own force.

May be Relative KE Theory.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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5/6/2010 9:36:56 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 8:59:56 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:55:15 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?

Newton's Third Law? Inertia? Net force? Magnitude? Exactly what would you like defined?

Simply why would I not be able to push myself back with my own force.

koopin, try this.

with your friend, stand facing each other toe to toe and push him over (without leaning). You'll notice that along with pushing him, that you push yourself over (and have to catch yourself with your back foot.

You can also do this with two rolling chairs, if you sit in one and he sits in one, and you push him, you both move.

This is Newton's 3rd law. Every force has an equal and opposite force, when you push him, he gets one force (we'll call it "F") and you get the equal and opposite force (we'll call it "-F").

When you push yourself, you are getting both the pushing force, and the equal and opposite force so you have both F and -F and if you add those together, they eqaul Zero, regardless of what F actually is (so no matter how strong you are).
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
studentathletechristian8
Posts: 5,810
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5/7/2010 3:34:58 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/6/2010 9:36:56 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:59:56 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:55:15 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:53:48 PM, Koopin wrote:
At 5/6/2010 8:52:06 PM, studentathletechristian8 wrote:
Also, in regards to your question about pushing yourself rather than your friend pushing on you:

When your friend pushes you, you move because you are still while he is applying a force that has an acceleration. The net force is moving towards you.

When you push yourself, not only is your own upper body resisting the push, but your arms themselves are resisting the push of the bowl. Every action has an equal an opposite reaction. The net force is balanced.

Do you know what the scientific terms for this is?

Newton's Third Law? Inertia? Net force? Magnitude? Exactly what would you like defined?

Simply why would I not be able to push myself back with my own force.

koopin, try this.

with your friend, stand facing each other toe to toe and push him over (without leaning). You'll notice that along with pushing him, that you push yourself over (and have to catch yourself with your back foot.

You can also do this with two rolling chairs, if you sit in one and he sits in one, and you push him, you both move.

This is Newton's 3rd law. Every force has an equal and opposite force, when you push him, he gets one force (we'll call it "F") and you get the equal and opposite force (we'll call it "-F").

When you push yourself, you are getting both the pushing force, and the equal and opposite force so you have both F and -F and if you add those together, they eqaul Zero, regardless of what F actually is (so no matter how strong you are).

Correct.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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5/8/2010 11:03:00 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 5/7/2010 10:59:31 AM, Koopin wrote:
Okay, thanks everyone.

Glad to help, if you have any other questions, shoot the off.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"