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Violating the laws of the internet

Varrack
Posts: 2,411
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9/1/2015 12:46:24 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/1/2015 12:36:07 AM, triangle.128k wrote:
http://wwww.google.cn...

This URL works, but it has 4 w's in the begging instead of 3, what on Earth?

It must be a Chinese website. Their internet probably works much different in terms of URL.
UtherPenguin
Posts: 3,684
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9/1/2015 3:22:13 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/1/2015 12:46:24 AM, Varrack wrote:
At 9/1/2015 12:36:07 AM, triangle.128k wrote:
http://wwww.google.cn...

This URL works, but it has 4 w's in the begging instead of 3, what on Earth?

It must be a Chinese website. Their internet probably works much different in terms of URL.

There are two types of internet. The world's internet, and China's internet https://tedconfblog.files.wordpress.com...
"Praise Allah."
~YYW
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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9/2/2015 1:34:59 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/1/2015 12:36:07 AM, triangle.128k wrote:
http://wwww.google.cn...

This URL works, but it has 4 w's in the begging instead of 3, what on Earth?

Well, this is how DNS works. There are three parts of the address.

.com - The TLD. You can't mess with these. You can't register them. Unless you are running internal DNS only, you are only going to get what is available from the short list of country, edu, biz com etc.

debate. - This is the part you or anyone can register. Simply put, as long as this and the TLD are unique, you can "buy" the space.

www. - this is a free for all. You, as owner of a domain, can make just about whatever you like. WWW is... history. You will just do this one, but you can do anything else you like too. debates.debate.org is perfectly legit.

I can go into a bunch of detail if you like, what is a "A-record" etc. its all very interesting really, but simple point is. The left most part of a domain using www is only habit, history, normal etc.
triangle.128k
Posts: 3,675
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9/2/2015 1:38:41 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/2/2015 1:34:59 AM, TBR wrote:
At 9/1/2015 12:36:07 AM, triangle.128k wrote:
http://wwww.google.cn...

This URL works, but it has 4 w's in the begging instead of 3, what on Earth?

Well, this is how DNS works. There are three parts of the address.

.com - The TLD. You can't mess with these. You can't register them. Unless you are running internal DNS only, you are only going to get what is available from the short list of country, edu, biz com etc.

debate. - This is the part you or anyone can register. Simply put, as long as this and the TLD are unique, you can "buy" the space.

www. - this is a free for all. You, as owner of a domain, can make just about whatever you like. WWW is... history. You will just do this one, but you can do anything else you like too. debates.debate.org is perfectly legit.

I can go into a bunch of detail if you like, what is a "A-record" etc. its all very interesting really, but simple point is. The left most part of a domain using www is only habit, history, normal etc.

I'm aware of the other two parts and how they work. But are you basically saying that "www" means nothing nowadays?

But if that's the case, I'm just curious to know why Google would put 4 Ws in the URL. Was there a purpose?
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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9/2/2015 1:40:30 AM
Posted: 1 year ago

I'm aware of the other two parts and how they work. But are you basically saying that "www" means nothing nowadays?

But if that's the case, I'm just curious to know why Google would put 4 Ws in the URL. Was there a purpose?

I am saying it never has. www is just what we used. It became a defacto standard, that's all. Even back in the day, you would have seen ftp.xxxx.com or smtp.xxxx.com. Its only for us humans, that's all.
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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9/2/2015 1:45:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
It is a bit of interest, but operating properly on the internet we ALL have reverse DNS names. This gets a little more complex, but is fun too.

Now, with the way modern NAT works, this gets a bit diluted, but... Point is, at some point you personally have a proper DNS name (reverse)
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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9/2/2015 1:51:31 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/2/2015 1:38:41 AM, triangle.128k wrote:
At 9/2/2015 1:34:59 AM, TBR wrote:
At 9/1/2015 12:36:07 AM, triangle.128k wrote:
http://wwww.google.cn...

This URL works, but it has 4 w's in the begging instead of 3, what on Earth?

Well, this is how DNS works. There are three parts of the address.

.com - The TLD. You can't mess with these. You can't register them. Unless you are running internal DNS only, you are only going to get what is available from the short list of country, edu, biz com etc.

debate. - This is the part you or anyone can register. Simply put, as long as this and the TLD are unique, you can "buy" the space.

www. - this is a free for all. You, as owner of a domain, can make just about whatever you like. WWW is... history. You will just do this one, but you can do anything else you like too. debates.debate.org is perfectly legit.

I can go into a bunch of detail if you like, what is a "A-record" etc. its all very interesting really, but simple point is. The left most part of a domain using www is only habit, history, normal etc.

I'm aware of the other two parts and how they work. But are you basically saying that "www" means nothing nowadays?

But if that's the case, I'm just curious to know why Google would put 4 Ws in the URL. Was there a purpose?

internal-application.1.localserversChicago is a completely valid DNS name... It just isn't valid for the Internet.
triangle.128k
Posts: 3,675
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9/2/2015 7:23:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/2/2015 1:40:30 AM, TBR wrote:

I'm aware of the other two parts and how they work. But are you basically saying that "www" means nothing nowadays?

But if that's the case, I'm just curious to know why Google would put 4 Ws in the URL. Was there a purpose?

I am saying it never has. www is just what we used. It became a defacto standard, that's all. Even back in the day, you would have seen ftp.xxxx.com or smtp.xxxx.com. Its only for us humans, that's all.

I'm a little confused, but basically "WWW" is changeable? Like how gmail's URL is mail.google.com?
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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9/2/2015 7:48:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I'm a little confused, but basically "WWW" is changeable? Like how gmail's URL is mail.google.com?

OK. Well, lets run through a bit. All I am doing with a A-Record is pointing at a IP address. So,
www.debate.org can equal 54.88.79.230.

There is no written standard, or bit of technology that forces me to make the first part be www, just history and convince. What admins have done through time is use names that relate to type of service, server, protocol etc. As an example.
smtp.gmail.com
imap.gmail.com
ftp.gmail.com

These are protocols, and a handy way for me to remember what DNS name to use. In another example,
mail.gmail.com

this describes service, not protocol, right? Further, I may want to name a particular resource, bit of hardware.
ClientFiles.domain.com
DropPrinter.domain.com

Its all up to me what I call them, and the names are just a way to help the user. Noe, when you look at the server, its a different story. The server cares very little about the DNS stuff. It just gets requests. I have to have something on the server responding to the request in a way the client and I can agree on. We start on port. The traditional port for the HTTP protocol is 80. The server binds a service on port 80 expecting calls to it to want HTML back. I can, however, change any part of that I like. The server can be on another port, I could have FTP tied to port 80.

Truth is, there is a lot of stuff going on that is simply run on tradition and ad-hock standards. It is fun and interesting to have a conversation with an SMTP (mail) server. You start by saying "HELO". I kid you not. It even say "bye" after it accepts your mail. There is literally no one talking to a mail server, but they have been saying hello and bye to each other for 40 years.
triangle.128k
Posts: 3,675
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9/2/2015 7:50:16 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/2/2015 7:48:08 PM, TBR wrote:
I'm a little confused, but basically "WWW" is changeable? Like how gmail's URL is mail.google.com?

OK. Well, lets run through a bit. All I am doing with a A-Record is pointing at a IP address. So,
www.debate.org can equal 54.88.79.230.

There is no written standard, or bit of technology that forces me to make the first part be www, just history and convince. What admins have done through time is use names that relate to type of service, server, protocol etc. As an example.
smtp.gmail.com
imap.gmail.com
ftp.gmail.com

These are protocols, and a handy way for me to remember what DNS name to use. In another example,
mail.gmail.com

this describes service, not protocol, right? Further, I may want to name a particular resource, bit of hardware.
ClientFiles.domain.com
DropPrinter.domain.com

Its all up to me what I call them, and the names are just a way to help the user. Noe, when you look at the server, its a different story. The server cares very little about the DNS stuff. It just gets requests. I have to have something on the server responding to the request in a way the client and I can agree on. We start on port. The traditional port for the HTTP protocol is 80. The server binds a service on port 80 expecting calls to it to want HTML back. I can, however, change any part of that I like. The server can be on another port, I could have FTP tied to port 80.

Truth is, there is a lot of stuff going on that is simply run on tradition and ad-hock standards. It is fun and interesting to have a conversation with an SMTP (mail) server. You start by saying "HELO". I kid you not. It even say "bye" after it accepts your mail. There is literally no one talking to a mail server, but they have been saying hello and bye to each other for 40 years.

Oh, I get it now. Thanks.