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Grammar Assistance

Freeman
Posts: 1,239
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11/8/2010 10:58:16 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
This is a thread for people to discuss various issues they may have with grammar or writing in general. Most of the time, I search around the internet or some of my English books when I need help with grammar, and that usually helps get my question answered. However, I think a thread for this would make things a lot easier for some people.

After reading many different debates, I can sometimes grow slightly exasperated with people making the same basic grammar mistakes over and over again.

Consider the following examples:

That is = (i.e., ......) It is not (ie .....) or (i.e. .....) or (IE .... ) or (Ie .... )

For example = (e.g., .... ) not (e.g. .....) or (Eg .....) etc.

In both cases, there is a comma after the initial two letters that are both followed by periods. The parenthesis aren't really necessary all the time. At least, I think that's correct. I might be wrong about that. Example sentence: "The God of theism (i.e., an omniscient, omnipotent and omnipresent God) just might exist."

If you want to abbreviate "page," here is the proper way to do it: p. 15 p. 17 p. 19 pp. 17-20 etc. One page is just p. followed by the number. Two pages is pp. followed by the number. The abbreviation is not "pg." or "pgs.".

Furthermore, commas always go on the inside of quotation marks. Example Sentence: "He said that the President's financial plan was too "amorphous," but he wouldn't say anything beyond that.

They're = They are

There = a location (as in, "Look over there.")

Their = possession (as in, "Their music is really good!") etc. etc. etc.

If you have any questions whatsoever about something relating to grammar, put it in this tread and someone should help you out. If you don't know where to put a comma or you want someone to look something over, I'm sure someone would be happy to help.
Chancellor of Propaganda and Foreign Relations in the Franklin administration.

"I intend to live forever. So far, so good." -- Steven Wright
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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11/8/2010 11:05:28 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
Freeman - Did you lose an avatar bet? If not, thanks for being an ally lol.

That said, it always annoys me when people put punctuation outside of quotes (it's very common). There are a lot of other things that bug me too but I can't think of them right now. I didn't know there needed to be a comma after i.e. and e.g., so thanks for pointing that out. When I think of other annoyances later I'll come back... but for now my PS3 just finished updating, so I g2g play Black Ops :D
President of DDO
Freeman
Posts: 1,239
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11/8/2010 11:17:46 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/8/2010 11:05:28 PM, theLwerd wrote:
Freeman - Did you lose an avatar bet? If not, thanks for being an ally lol.

It's a shameless ploy to get gay people to notice, read and vote on my Proposition 8 debate. :P I figured that the flag would stand out enough. But you know I'm still an ally regardless.

That said, it always annoys me when people put punctuation outside of quotes (it's very common). There are a lot of other things that bug me too but I can't think of them right now. I didn't know there needed to be a comma after i.e. and e.g., so thanks for pointing that out. When I think of other annoyances later I'll come back... but for now my PS3 just finished updating, so I g2g play Black Ops :D

I'm 100% certain that is correct.

(i.e.,) (e.g.,)

I didn't even know that game was out yet. Do you like it?
Chancellor of Propaganda and Foreign Relations in the Franklin administration.

"I intend to live forever. So far, so good." -- Steven Wright
Puck
Posts: 6,457
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11/8/2010 11:25:49 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/8/2010 11:05:28 PM, theLwerd wrote:
Freeman - Did you lose an avatar bet? If not, thanks for being an ally lol.

That said, it always annoys me when people put punctuation outside of quotes (it's very common).

That's also contextual and compounded by being an American convention - it differs a little with British English. :)
tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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11/8/2010 11:43:07 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
I like to think I'm pretty good grammer-wise.
One thing that I don't know is how brackets work with full-stops.
For example, if I were to write a sentence (but add a little bit in a bracket at the end).

Does that full-stop go inside or outside of the brackets?
"Caitlyn Jenner is an incredibly brave and stunningly beautiful woman."

Muh threads
Using mafia tactics in real-life: http://www.debate.org...
6 years of DDO: http://www.debate.org...
Freeman
Posts: 1,239
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11/9/2010 12:12:37 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/8/2010 11:43:07 PM, tvellalott wrote:
I like to think I'm pretty good grammer-wise.
One thing that I don't know is how brackets work with full-stops.
For example, if I were to write a sentence (but add a little bit in a bracket at the end).

Does that full-stop go inside or outside of the brackets?

Could you give an example.
Chancellor of Propaganda and Foreign Relations in the Franklin administration.

"I intend to live forever. So far, so good." -- Steven Wright
tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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11/9/2010 12:20:02 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/9/2010 12:12:37 AM, Freeman wrote:
At 11/8/2010 11:43:07 PM, tvellalott wrote:
I like to think I'm pretty good grammer-wise.
One thing that I don't know is how brackets work with full-stops.
For example, if I were to write a sentence (but add a little bit in a bracket at the end).

Does that full-stop go inside or outside of the brackets?

Could you give an example.
"Caitlyn Jenner is an incredibly brave and stunningly beautiful woman."

Muh threads
Using mafia tactics in real-life: http://www.debate.org...
6 years of DDO: http://www.debate.org...
innomen
Posts: 10,052
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11/9/2010 1:00:05 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/8/2010 11:25:49 PM, Puck wrote:
At 11/8/2010 11:05:28 PM, theLwerd wrote:
Freeman - Did you lose an avatar bet? If not, thanks for being an ally lol.

That said, it always annoys me when people put punctuation outside of quotes (it's very common).

That's also contextual and compounded by being an American convention - it differs a little with British English. :)

Puck you are correct in this; regardless of American convention.
feverish
Posts: 2,716
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11/9/2010 8:18:47 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/8/2010 11:25:49 PM, Puck wrote:
At 11/8/2010 11:05:28 PM, theLwerd wrote:
Freeman - Did you lose an avatar bet? If not, thanks for being an ally lol.

That said, it always annoys me when people put punctuation outside of quotes (it's very common).

That's also contextual and compounded by being an American convention - it differs a little with British English. :)

Yeah and we all know who invented the language :P

http://www.englishforums.com...

In American usage printers usually place a period or comma inside closing quotation marks whether it belongs logically to the quoted matter or to the whole sentence or context.... But when a logical or exact distinction is desired in specialized work in which clarity is more important than usual (as in this dictionary), a period or comma can be placed outside quotation marks when it belongs not in the quoted matter but to a larger unit containing the quoted matter. The package is labeled "Handle with Care".
innomen
Posts: 10,052
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11/9/2010 9:50:28 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 11/9/2010 8:18:47 AM, feverish wrote:
At 11/8/2010 11:25:49 PM, Puck wrote:
At 11/8/2010 11:05:28 PM, theLwerd wrote:
Freeman - Did you lose an avatar bet? If not, thanks for being an ally lol.

That said, it always annoys me when people put punctuation outside of quotes (it's very common).

That's also contextual and compounded by being an American convention - it differs a little with British English. :)

Yeah and we all know who invented the language :P

http://www.englishforums.com...

In American usage printers usually place a period or comma inside closing quotation marks whether it belongs logically to the quoted matter or to the whole sentence or context.... But when a logical or exact distinction is desired in specialized work in which clarity is more important than usual (as in this dictionary), a period or comma can be placed outside quotation marks when it belongs not in the quoted matter but to a larger unit containing the quoted matter. The package is labeled "Handle with Care".

And for that, i for one, am grateful.