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Math Help, Please!

idkmybffbill
Posts: 87
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1/29/2011 9:32:37 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Here's the question:

On a blueprint, 1 inch represents 3 feet. Renee says the scale is 1:3, but Sierra disagrees. Sierra says the scale is 1:36. Who is correct? Explain.

I was confused because the original scale should be 1:3, but if you convert feet to inches, the scale would be 1:36. Should I choose Renee because that is the original scale or Sierra because she converted the scale? Or should I just say that the answer is both?

Thank you!
belle
Posts: 4,113
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1/29/2011 9:39:11 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
they're both right, but you have to specify what units you're using to avoid confusion.
evidently i only come to ddo to avoid doing homework...
tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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1/29/2011 9:41:25 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 1/29/2011 9:32:37 PM, idkmybffbill wrote:
Here's the question:

On a blueprint, 1 inch represents 3 feet. Renee says the scale is 1:3, but Sierra disagrees. Sierra says the scale is 1:36. Who is correct? Explain.

I don't see how 1 inch representing 3 feet can ever be 1:3.
I would choose Sierra.
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idkmybffbill
Posts: 87
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1/29/2011 9:47:20 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 1/29/2011 9:41:25 PM, tvellalott wrote:
At 1/29/2011 9:32:37 PM, idkmybffbill wrote:
Here's the question:

On a blueprint, 1 inch represents 3 feet. Renee says the scale is 1:3, but Sierra disagrees. Sierra says the scale is 1:36. Who is correct? Explain.

I don't see how 1 inch representing 3 feet can ever be 1:3.
I would choose Sierra.

Why can't you see 1 inch representing 3 feet as 1:3? I think that both work, but I'm having trouble choosing one.
tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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1/29/2011 10:26:49 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 1/29/2011 9:47:20 PM, idkmybffbill wrote:
At 1/29/2011 9:41:25 PM, tvellalott wrote:
At 1/29/2011 9:32:37 PM, idkmybffbill wrote:
Here's the question:

On a blueprint, 1 inch represents 3 feet. Renee says the scale is 1:3, but Sierra disagrees. Sierra says the scale is 1:36. Who is correct? Explain.

I don't see how 1 inch representing 3 feet can ever be 1:3.
I would choose Sierra.

Why can't you see 1 inch representing 3 feet as 1:3? I think that both work, but I'm having trouble choosing one.

Because that isn't how scale works.
1 inch goes into 3 feet 36 times. 1 foot to 3 foot is 1:3...
How does 1inch:3foot = 1:3
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Grape
Posts: 989
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1/30/2011 12:27:08 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The answer is 1:36, not 1 to 3. The question is clearly asking for a ratio of the actual distance, not the units. Otherwise it would be a fairly pointless question.

If one inch on the map is equal to three real feet, than the map is 36 times smaller, not 3 times smaller.

Also, we should just use the metric system for everything an avoid this shenanigans.
idkmybffbill
Posts: 87
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1/31/2011 9:59:35 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
It was for math homework, and the answer was both! LOL. It's because if you don't convert anything the correct answer is 1:3, but if you do convert it, it's 1:36. I guess I just over thought it!
mongeese
Posts: 5,387
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1/31/2011 10:04:04 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
No, there's no way you can call the scale 1:3. That is just intellectually against mathematics. Who said that it was both? I cannot think of a single math teacher who would accept 1:3 as a ratio in that case. Ratios by definition have no units, and therefore, each part must have the same unit.
ccstate4peat
Posts: 2,022
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1/31/2011 10:24:07 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 1/31/2011 9:59:35 PM, idkmybffbill wrote:
It was for math homework, and the answer was both! LOL. It's because if you don't convert anything the correct answer is 1:3, but if you do convert it, it's 1:36. I guess I just over thought it!

Are you in the fourth grade?
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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2/1/2011 3:38:44 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 1/30/2011 12:27:08 AM, Grape wrote:
Also, we should just use the metric system for everything an avoid this shenanigans.

1 cm on a blueprint = .33 meters.

Is the scale 1: .33 or 1: 33 ?
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Grape
Posts: 989
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2/1/2011 6:55:42 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/1/2011 3:38:44 AM, Ragnar_Rahl wrote:
At 1/30/2011 12:27:08 AM, Grape wrote:
Also, we should just use the metric system for everything an avoid this shenanigans.

1 cm on a blueprint = .33 meters.

Is the scale 1: .33 or 1: 33 ?

That just makes it look tricky by mixing prefixes and decimals. In the metric sustem "c" is just another way of writing 10^-2. So it's .01: .33, or 1: 33. It creates the appearance of having different units, but if you're measuring length it's really all in meters. In the traditional system, you have a whole bunch of different units that are pretty arbitrary and random for measuring the same thing (length).