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The settlement to end all settlements

falconduler
Posts: 228
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12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...
sadolite
Posts: 8,838
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12/3/2012 5:42:11 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM, falconduler wrote:
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...

Giving land to the Palestinians to develope is like giving money to a compulsive gamler to hold onto for a rainy day. Any land they would get will be turned into an unlivable rat hole.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
thett3
Posts: 14,348
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12/3/2012 5:42:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
tl;dr
DDO Vice President

#StandwithBossy

#UnbanTheMadman

#BetOnThett

"Don't quote me, ever." -Max

"My name is max. I'm not a big fan of slacks"- Max rapping

"Walmart should have the opportunity to bribe a politician to it's agenda" -Max

"Thett, you're really good at convincing people you're a decent person"-tulle

"You fit the character of Regina George quite nicely"- Sam

: At 11/12/2016 11:49:40 PM, Raisor wrote:
: thett was right
falconduler
Posts: 228
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12/3/2012 5:48:00 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/3/2012 5:42:11 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM, falconduler wrote:
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...

Giving land to the Palestinians to develope is like giving money to a compulsive gamler to hold onto for a rainy day. Any land they would get will be turned into an unlivable rat hole.

sounds like a very racist thing to say..no?
1Devilsadvocate
Posts: 1,518
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12/3/2012 7:13:17 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/3/2012 5:48:00 PM, falconduler wrote:
At 12/3/2012 5:42:11 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM, falconduler wrote:
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...

Giving land to the Palestinians to develope is like giving money to a compulsive gamler to hold onto for a rainy day. Any land they would get will be turned into an unlivable rat hole.

sounds like a very racist thing to say..no?

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL.

You calling some one a racist.
I cannot write in English, because of the treacherous spelling. When I am reading, I only hear it and am unable to remember what the written word looks like."
"Albert Einstein

http://www.twainquotes.com... , http://thewritecorner.wordpress.com... , http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com...
falconduler
Posts: 228
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12/3/2012 7:30:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/3/2012 7:13:17 PM, 1Devilsadvocate wrote:
At 12/3/2012 5:48:00 PM, falconduler wrote:
At 12/3/2012 5:42:11 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM, falconduler wrote:
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...

Giving land to the Palestinians to develope is like giving money to a compulsive gamler to hold onto for a rainy day. Any land they would get will be turned into an unlivable rat hole.

sounds like a very racist thing to say..no?

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL.

You calling some one a racist.

well im not a racist. what can i say?
truthseeker613
Posts: 464
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12/3/2012 7:44:25 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/3/2012 7:30:56 PM, falconduler wrote:
At 12/3/2012 7:13:17 PM, 1Devilsadvocate wrote:
At 12/3/2012 5:48:00 PM, falconduler wrote:
At 12/3/2012 5:42:11 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM, falconduler wrote:
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...

Giving land to the Palestinians to develope is like giving money to a compulsive gamler to hold onto for a rainy day. Any land they would get will be turned into an unlivable rat hole.

sounds like a very racist thing to say..no?

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL.

You calling some one a racist.

well im not a racist. what can i say?

LOL. care to debate that?
http://www.nydailynews.com...

royalpaladin: I'd rather support people who kill spies than a nation that organizes assassination squads (Kidon) to illegally enter into other nations and kill anybody who is not a Zionist. Who knows when they'll kill me for the crime of not supporting Israel?

Koopin: LOL! I just imagine Royal sitting in here apartment at night, when suddenly she hears a man outside speaking Hebrew as sh
jat93
Posts: 1,440
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12/4/2012 11:40:08 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Not racist? Dude, many of your views seem copied straight from a KKK textbook, if they had textbooks, or if anyone gave a sh!t about them anymore (cuz racism is like soooooo 50 years ago man get with the times amiright?)
falconduler
Posts: 228
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12/4/2012 4:01:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/4/2012 11:40:08 AM, jat93 wrote:
Not racist? Dude, many of your views seem copied straight from a KKK textbook, if they had textbooks, or if anyone gave a sh!t about them anymore (cuz racism is like soooooo 50 years ago man get with the times amiright?)

zionists kik the potus in the rear and you are concerned about the klan?
imabench
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12/4/2012 4:27:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/4/2012 11:40:08 AM, jat93 wrote:
Not racist? Dude, many of your views seem copied straight from a KKK textbook, if they had textbooks, or if anyone gave a sh!t about them anymore (cuz racism is like soooooo 50 years ago man get with the times amiright?)

I wouldnt think that....... The KKK are illiterate hicks, they could never right a book
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sadolite
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12/4/2012 5:15:54 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/3/2012 5:48:00 PM, falconduler wrote:
At 12/3/2012 5:42:11 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/3/2012 4:40:10 PM, falconduler wrote:
..E1, West Bank (Reuters) - The hillside called E1 is one of the few places around Jerusalem that Jesus Christ might still recognize: a stony, dusty, barren slope on the way down to the desert and the Dead Sea.

If Israel carries out plans announced this week, it is destined to be the site of another Jewish settlement city, on occupied land that the Palestinians believe must be part of the state for which they have just won de facto U.N. recognition.

Roads that seem to go nowhere run up its rocky slopes and streetlights provide slivers of shade from the often fierce sun. There is an Israeli police station, but no houses or shops.

Known simply by its administrative name, E1 (East One), this exposed stretch of West Bank land is at the centre of a growing diplomatic dispute pitting Israel against both the Palestinians and also many of its Western allies.

Stunned by the vote last week in the General Assembly that accorded Palestine the status of a "non-member state" at the United Nations, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government resurrected an old plan to build on the empty outcrop.

Critics immediately warned that populating E1 with Israelis would cut off East Jerusalem and carve up the West Bank, effectively thwarting any chance of viability for a Palestinian state and thereby extinguishing the Middle East peace process.

"This is not a routine settlement. This is the doomsday settlement," said Daniel Seidemann, the founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an Israeli non-governmental organization that monitors urban development in and around the holy city.

"The message Israel should have learned from the U.N. vote is that we are on very thin ice," he added. "By threatening E1 you are standing on thin ice and jumping up and down."

That view is rejected by supporters of the project, who say construction is long overdue and represents natural expansion from the neighboring Maale Adumim settlement - a city of red-roofed apartment blocks that is home to more than 30,000 people.

Over half a million Israelis now live on land taken in the 1967 Middle East war, claiming historical and biblical ties to territory that the Palestinians say belongs to them.

The E1 site covers only some 4.6 square miles (12 square km) but is geographically sensitive because it not only juts into the narrow "waist" of the West Bank, but also backs onto East Jerusalem, where Palestinians want to establish their capital.

CORRIDORS

Building on this area would complicate efforts to draw the contours of a contiguous state for the Palestinians, making it more difficult for surrounding Arab communities to link up.

However, supporters of the project say it is not a deal-breaker for any peace treaty, arguing there would be enough space on either side of the hill to enable a broad corridor that could connect the West Bank cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem, respectively north and south of Jerusalem.

"The media are telling lies about this conflict all the time," said Eli Har Nir, the municipality general director of Maale Adumim.

"You can't even see Jerusalem from here. There is still six kilometers of open land that does not belong to E1 or to Maale Adumim," he said, arguing that this space could be used to build roads for Palestinians.

Israel's closest ally, the United States, sees it differently and successive administrations have cautioned against any building on the largely unpopulated expanse of E1.

The White House swiftly denounced Friday's announcement, which came along with news that the government also plans to build 3,000 additional homes in other, undisclosed West Bank and East Jerusalem settlements.

A number of European Union governments went further, with Britain, France and Sweden summoning their respective Israeli ambassadors to protest at what they saw as an unacceptable reprisal against the Palestinians for the U.N. vote.

The mood in neighboring Maale Adumim was more celebratory of the Israeli move. Locals urged Netanyahu not to buckle under pressure but to push ahead with the long-delayed E1 plans.

"Successive governments have all promised to build here, but what you can see around me are empty hills, rocks and sand, not apartments," said Maale Adumim mayor Benny Kashriel.

"I hope that this government, with this decision, will come through immediately," he told reporters gathered on top of E1.

Israelis have already named the prospective settlement Mevasseret Adumim - Tidings of Adumim. Maale Adumim itself means Red Heights - a reference to the surrounding mountains that glow at sunset.

Preparation for building started long ago and a sealed-off bridge stands ready to link Maale Adumim with its projected sister settlement, while a major road intersection swings up into E1 from the highway that heads down to the nearby Dead Sea.

If you take the exit today, the only people you are likely to find are Bedouin shepherds following their ragged goat herds in search of the occasional tuft of grass.

Israeli authorities drew up plans in 2006 to move the Arab Bedouin to another site. They have yet to act on it, but rights groups say the project is specifically designed to clear the way for E1 development.

Israel's Maariv newspaper said on Monday that the Israeli planning committee for the West Bank would convene on Wednesday to approve plans for public review. Without further delays, the earth-movers could be sent in within a year.

(Editing by Douglas Hamilton and Alastair Macdonald)

...

Giving land to the Palestinians to develope is like giving money to a compulsive gamler to hold onto for a rainy day. Any land they would get will be turned into an unlivable rat hole.

sounds like a very racist thing to say..no?

"sounds like a very racist thing to say..no?" No, it isn't, it is a factual obsevation. They do nothing to improve their living standards and spend all their time, money and effort hating jews and trying to kill jews. Sounds like a very racist thing, no?
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
brian_eggleston
Posts: 3,347
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12/6/2012 6:03:44 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
The Israelis intend to settle Area E1 to separate the West Bank from East Jerusalem which would create "vital irreversible facts on the ground." and think they can trick the Americans into supporting their plan by disguising their real motives.

The following article was published today in Israel National News:

"Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu must ignore the Pavlovian response of the international community against building in Jerusalem, particularly in Area E1. The fate of the Jewish State depends largely upon the government"s ability to take immediate action and to populate the area that links Jerusalem to Maaleh Adumim with thousands of Jews.

Netanyahu will be put to the test to prove that his rhetoric about a united Jerusalem and the incorporation of settlement blocs " such as Maaleh Adumim " into Israel has substance. Former American President George W. Bush"s promise to allow the incorporation of settlement blocs is to be capitalized upon in this context.

We should also remember that the US has opposed Israeli settlement efforts since 1967 and only rarely did American objections have an impact on Israeli decisions on this issue. Moreover, the Americans can be persuaded to tacitly go along with linking Maaleh Adumim to Jerusalem if a clear strategic vision based upon the principle of territorial compromise is presented.

While the strategic wisdom of indiscriminately settling the Land of Israel is not compelling, a selective settlement policy focusing on areas within the Israeli consensus, including Maaleh Adumim and the Jordan Valley, can be pursued with little foreign interference.

Area E1 is of vital importance for the political future of Jerusalem and for Israel"s chances to establish a defensible line along its eastern border. It is imperative to build homes for Jews there. Hopefully, Netanyahu will soon send the bulldozers to create vital irreversible facts on the ground."

The author is Professor in Political Studies at Bar-Ilan University and the Director of its Begin-Sadat (BESA) Center for Strategic Studies.

http://www.israelnationalnews.com...
Visit the burglars' bulletin board: http://www.break-in-news.com...
falconduler
Posts: 228
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12/6/2012 4:35:48 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/6/2012 6:03:44 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
The Israelis intend to settle Area E1 to separate the West Bank from East Jerusalem which would create "vital irreversible facts on the ground." and think they can trick the Americans into supporting their plan by disguising their real motives.

The following article was published today in Israel National News:

"Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu must ignore the Pavlovian response of the international community against building in Jerusalem, particularly in Area E1. The fate of the Jewish State depends largely upon the government"s ability to take immediate action and to populate the area that links Jerusalem to Maaleh Adumim with thousands of Jews.

Netanyahu will be put to the test to prove that his rhetoric about a united Jerusalem and the incorporation of settlement blocs " such as Maaleh Adumim " into Israel has substance. Former American President George W. Bush"s promise to allow the incorporation of settlement blocs is to be capitalized upon in this context.

We should also remember that the US has opposed Israeli settlement efforts since 1967 and only rarely did American objections have an impact on Israeli decisions on this issue. Moreover, the Americans can be persuaded to tacitly go along with linking Maaleh Adumim to Jerusalem if a clear strategic vision based upon the principle of territorial compromise is presented.

While the strategic wisdom of indiscriminately settling the Land of Israel is not compelling, a selective settlement policy focusing on areas within the Israeli consensus, including Maaleh Adumim and the Jordan Valley, can be pursued with little foreign interference.

Area E1 is of vital importance for the political future of Jerusalem and for Israel"s chances to establish a defensible line along its eastern border. It is imperative to build homes for Jews there. Hopefully, Netanyahu will soon send the bulldozers to create vital irreversible facts on the ground."

The author is Professor in Political Studies at Bar-Ilan University and the Director of its Begin-Sadat (BESA) Center for Strategic Studies.

http://www.israelnationalnews.com...
the jews have been tricking the usa for the last 70 years or more. since the revolution. they don't think they can ,they've been doing it for a long time. .they now control the usa [zog]
sadolite
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12/6/2012 8:16:02 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/6/2012 4:35:48 PM, falconduler wrote:
At 12/6/2012 6:03:44 AM, brian_eggleston wrote:
The Israelis intend to settle Area E1 to separate the West Bank from East Jerusalem which would create "vital irreversible facts on the ground." and think they can trick the Americans into supporting their plan by disguising their real motives.

The following article was published today in Israel National News:

"Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu must ignore the Pavlovian response of the international community against building in Jerusalem, particularly in Area E1. The fate of the Jewish State depends largely upon the government"s ability to take immediate action and to populate the area that links Jerusalem to Maaleh Adumim with thousands of Jews.

Netanyahu will be put to the test to prove that his rhetoric about a united Jerusalem and the incorporation of settlement blocs " such as Maaleh Adumim " into Israel has substance. Former American President George W. Bush"s promise to allow the incorporation of settlement blocs is to be capitalized upon in this context.

We should also remember that the US has opposed Israeli settlement efforts since 1967 and only rarely did American objections have an impact on Israeli decisions on this issue. Moreover, the Americans can be persuaded to tacitly go along with linking Maaleh Adumim to Jerusalem if a clear strategic vision based upon the principle of territorial compromise is presented.

While the strategic wisdom of indiscriminately settling the Land of Israel is not compelling, a selective settlement policy focusing on areas within the Israeli consensus, including Maaleh Adumim and the Jordan Valley, can be pursued with little foreign interference.

Area E1 is of vital importance for the political future of Jerusalem and for Israel"s chances to establish a defensible line along its eastern border. It is imperative to build homes for Jews there. Hopefully, Netanyahu will soon send the bulldozers to create vital irreversible facts on the ground."

The author is Professor in Political Studies at Bar-Ilan University and the Director of its Begin-Sadat (BESA) Center for Strategic Studies.

http://www.israelnationalnews.com...
the jews have been tricking the usa for the last 70 years or more. since the revolution. they don't think they can ,they've been doing it for a long time. .they now control the usa [zog]

Isreal builds houses, the Palestinians buy rockets and destroy houses. It is that simple. Oh, if all of the sudden the Palestinians were given hectares of free land they would develope it? No, they will continue to destroy houses and businesses and do nothing to improve their own lot in life. History proves this without any doubt. No treaty and no amount of land or money will ever change this fact.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
malcolmxy
Posts: 2,855
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12/11/2012 8:40:36 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/6/2012 8:16:02 PM, sadolite wrote:
Isreal builds houses, the Palestinians buy rockets and destroy houses. It is that simple. Oh, if all of the sudden the Palestinians were given hectares of free land they would develope it? No, they will continue to destroy houses and businesses and do nothing to improve their own lot in life. History proves this without any doubt. No treaty and no amount of land or money will ever change this fact.

If someone stole my house and locked me in the basement with no supplies lest a few random chemicals with which I could build a few random explosive weapons, I's spend all my time trying to blew them up as well.

How do you think the Jews in Rome, who were walled in with a single point of entry/exit, reacted when the same thing was done to them?

(NOTE - if your answer was, "sat around peacefully, singing and dancing to Hava Nagila", you'd be quite wrong.)

Do you have ay idea how horribly that would choke off any economy? During all bad economic times in every place where they are bad, extremism rises. In a place with a perpetually poor economy and an obvious (and correct) target to blame for those conditions, of course there are going to be extremists who move to violence against their oppressors.

That's what we like to call, in the biz, a completely normal reaction.
War is over, if you want it.

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1Devilsadvocate
Posts: 1,518
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12/11/2012 9:15:30 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/11/2012 8:40:36 AM, malcolmxy wrote:
At 12/6/2012 8:16:02 PM, sadolite wrote:
Isreal builds houses, the Palestinians buy rockets and destroy houses. It is that simple. Oh, if all of the sudden the Palestinians were given hectares of free land they would develope it? No, they will continue to destroy houses and businesses and do nothing to improve their own lot in life. History proves this without any doubt. No treaty and no amount of land or money will ever change this fact.

If someone stole my house and locked me in the basement with no supplies lest a few random chemicals with which I could build a few random explosive weapons, I's spend all my time trying to blew them up as well.

How do you think the Jews in Rome, who were walled in with a single point of entry/exit, reacted when the same thing was done to them?

(NOTE - if your answer was, "sat around peacefully, singing and dancing to Hava Nagila", you'd be quite wrong.)

Do you have ay idea how horribly that would choke off any economy? During all bad economic times in every place where they are bad, extremism rises. In a place with a perpetually poor economy and an obvious (and correct) target to blame for those conditions, of course there are going to be extremists who move to violence against their oppressors.

That's what we like to call, in the biz, a completely normal reaction.

OVER SIMPLIFICATION.

I take it you have never been to Gaza / the west bank.

http://www.youtube.com...

http://www.reuters.com... Israel provides support to palestinians.

http://www.reuters.com...

http://www.theblaze.com...

http://www.youtube.com... - Israel Defense Forces (IDF) ensures the daily transfer of nearly 6,000 tons of goods and roughly 260 truckloads via Kerem Shalom, an Israel-Gaza land crossing.
I cannot write in English, because of the treacherous spelling. When I am reading, I only hear it and am unable to remember what the written word looks like."
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malcolmxy
Posts: 2,855
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12/11/2012 10:16:42 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
It doesn't matter how many handouts they're given (those go away a soon as they're handed out and have no chance to be used to build and grow a sustainable economy), and I'm well aware that many people in Israel don't support the actions of their government, but sometimes things are exactly that simple. - A single entry/exit, mass prison controlled by another sovereign will choke off an economy to the point where breaking out of that mass prison becomes the #1 priority for all rational people who are not black market profiteers within the system.
War is over, if you want it.

Meet Dr. Stupid and his assistants - http://www.debate.org...
falconduler
Posts: 228
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12/11/2012 4:12:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/11/2012 10:16:42 AM, malcolmxy wrote:
It doesn't matter how many handouts they're given (those go away a soon as they're handed out and have no chance to be used to build and grow a sustainable economy), and I'm well aware that many people in Israel don't support the actions of their government, but sometimes things are exactly that simple. - A single entry/exit, mass prison controlled by another sovereign will choke off an economy to the point where breaking out of that mass prison becomes the #1 priority for all rational people who are not black market profiteers within the system.

israel is one of the richest countries in the welt. 4 billion plus mucho mas goes directly into their treasury. if that's not extortion what would you call it?

christmas time in yiddishe .no?
sadolite
Posts: 8,838
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12/11/2012 8:42:32 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/11/2012 8:40:36 AM, malcolmxy wrote:
At 12/6/2012 8:16:02 PM, sadolite wrote:
Isreal builds houses, the Palestinians buy rockets and destroy houses. It is that simple. Oh, if all of the sudden the Palestinians were given hectares of free land they would develope it? No, they will continue to destroy houses and businesses and do nothing to improve their own lot in life. History proves this without any doubt. No treaty and no amount of land or money will ever change this fact.

If someone stole my house and locked me in the basement with no supplies lest a few random chemicals with which I could build a few random explosive weapons, I's spend all my time trying to blew them up as well.

How do you think the Jews in Rome, who were walled in with a single point of entry/exit, reacted when the same thing was done to them?

(NOTE - if your answer was, "sat around peacefully, singing and dancing to Hava Nagila", you'd be quite wrong.)

Do you have ay idea how horribly that would choke off any economy? During all bad economic times in every place where they are bad, extremism rises. In a place with a perpetually poor economy and an obvious (and correct) target to blame for those conditions, of course there are going to be extremists who move to violence against their oppressors.

That's what we like to call, in the biz, a completely normal reaction.

They have been free to do what ever they want with what they have. They choose to fight with Isreal, not coexsist. Their lot in life is their own doing. They are walled in because they choose to act like insane animals. They choose their life and have been choosing it for the past 40 years. Isreal has given up land before on several occasions and what happens, the same old crap, and the land they gave up is an unlivable rat hole that once had nice houses. Read a current history book why don't ya.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%