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Chances of an American Pope?

Cermank
Posts: 3,773
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3/11/2013 12:04:36 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
What are the prospects of an American being elected pope when 115 cardinals from around the world solemnly enter the frescoed splendor of the Vatican"s Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to begin the voting process known as the conclave?

Until recently, the received wisdom was that the Roman Catholic Church would never accept a pontiff from the world"s only superpower on the grounds that the United States already had quite enough temporal power.

There has also been concern that having an American pope could give the impression that the Vatican had embraced a pro-Washington bias, hindering the Catholic Church"s efforts to engage in tangled international issues such as the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the spread of militant Islam and poverty alleviation.

But with the end of the cold war and US hegemony declining, those concerns appear to have diminished, because the buzz in Rome is that at least two American cardinals have a fighting chance of being elected the successor to St. Peter this week.

They are Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the charismatic archbishop of New York, and Cardinal Sean Patrick O"Malley, the archbishop of Boston.

When Corriere della Sera, one of Italy"s leading daily newspapers, canvassed eight Vatican analysts and asked them to nominate their top three papal contenders at the weekend, Cardinal O"Malley was by far the most popular choice.

He comfortably beat Odilo Pedro Scherer of Brazil and Angelo Scola of Italy, widely perceived to be two of the strongest candidates for the top job.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/11/2013 2:01:40 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/11/2013 12:04:36 PM, Cermank wrote:
What are the prospects of an American being elected pope when 115 cardinals from around the world solemnly enter the frescoed splendor of the Vatican"s Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to begin the voting process known as the conclave?

Until recently, the received wisdom was that the Roman Catholic Church would never accept a pontiff from the world"s only superpower on the grounds that the United States already had quite enough temporal power.

There has also been concern that having an American pope could give the impression that the Vatican had embraced a pro-Washington bias, hindering the Catholic Church"s efforts to engage in tangled international issues such as the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the spread of militant Islam and poverty alleviation.

But with the end of the cold war and US hegemony declining, those concerns appear to have diminished, because the buzz in Rome is that at least two American cardinals have a fighting chance of being elected the successor to St. Peter this week.

They are Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the charismatic archbishop of New York, and Cardinal Sean Patrick O"Malley, the archbishop of Boston.

When Corriere della Sera, one of Italy"s leading daily newspapers, canvassed eight Vatican analysts and asked them to nominate their top three papal contenders at the weekend, Cardinal O"Malley was by far the most popular choice.

He comfortably beat Odilo Pedro Scherer of Brazil and Angelo Scola of Italy, widely perceived to be two of the strongest candidates for the top job.

I think that the nationality of the next pontiff should be the least of the Roman Catholic Church's concerns. At any rate, whoever he turns out to be will probably make little difference from a social justice and human liberation point of view. That is, he probably won't be someone who will explicitly embrace the preferential option for the poor and therefore won't be a true history maker in any enlightened way, shape, or fashion.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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3/11/2013 2:06:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/11/2013 2:01:40 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 3/11/2013 12:04:36 PM, Cermank wrote:
What are the prospects of an American being elected pope when 115 cardinals from around the world solemnly enter the frescoed splendor of the Vatican"s Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to begin the voting process known as the conclave?

Until recently, the received wisdom was that the Roman Catholic Church would never accept a pontiff from the world"s only superpower on the grounds that the United States already had quite enough temporal power.

There has also been concern that having an American pope could give the impression that the Vatican had embraced a pro-Washington bias, hindering the Catholic Church"s efforts to engage in tangled international issues such as the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the spread of militant Islam and poverty alleviation.

But with the end of the cold war and US hegemony declining, those concerns appear to have diminished, because the buzz in Rome is that at least two American cardinals have a fighting chance of being elected the successor to St. Peter this week.

They are Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the charismatic archbishop of New York, and Cardinal Sean Patrick O"Malley, the archbishop of Boston.

When Corriere della Sera, one of Italy"s leading daily newspapers, canvassed eight Vatican analysts and asked them to nominate their top three papal contenders at the weekend, Cardinal O"Malley was by far the most popular choice.

He comfortably beat Odilo Pedro Scherer of Brazil and Angelo Scola of Italy, widely perceived to be two of the strongest candidates for the top job.

I think that the nationality of the next pontiff should be the least of the Roman Catholic Church's concerns. At any rate, whoever he turns out to be will probably make little difference from a social justice and human liberation point of view. That is, he probably won't be someone who will explicitly embrace the preferential option for the poor and therefore won't be a true history maker in any enlightened way, shape, or fashion.

Thank you for your opinion, charlie. Anyone else?
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Cermank
Posts: 3,773
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3/11/2013 9:01:43 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/11/2013 2:01:40 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 3/11/2013 12:04:36 PM, Cermank wrote:
What are the prospects of an American being elected pope when 115 cardinals from around the world solemnly enter the frescoed splendor of the Vatican"s Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to begin the voting process known as the conclave?

Until recently, the received wisdom was that the Roman Catholic Church would never accept a pontiff from the world"s only superpower on the grounds that the United States already had quite enough temporal power.

There has also been concern that having an American pope could give the impression that the Vatican had embraced a pro-Washington bias, hindering the Catholic Church"s efforts to engage in tangled international issues such as the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the spread of militant Islam and poverty alleviation.

But with the end of the cold war and US hegemony declining, those concerns appear to have diminished, because the buzz in Rome is that at least two American cardinals have a fighting chance of being elected the successor to St. Peter this week.

They are Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the charismatic archbishop of New York, and Cardinal Sean Patrick O"Malley, the archbishop of Boston.

When Corriere della Sera, one of Italy"s leading daily newspapers, canvassed eight Vatican analysts and asked them to nominate their top three papal contenders at the weekend, Cardinal O"Malley was by far the most popular choice.

He comfortably beat Odilo Pedro Scherer of Brazil and Angelo Scola of Italy, widely perceived to be two of the strongest candidates for the top job.

I think that the nationality of the next pontiff should be the least of the Roman Catholic Church's concerns. At any rate, whoever he turns out to be will probably make little difference from a social justice and human liberation point of view. That is, he probably won't be someone who will explicitly embrace the preferential option for the poor and therefore won't be a true history maker in any enlightened way, shape, or fashion.

That is true. I found this interesting because of its political implications. Specifically the fact that the US hegemony has declined enough for them to be comfortable with an American pope. Interesting, huh?
tmar19652
Posts: 727
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3/12/2013 4:53:56 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/11/2013 2:01:40 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 3/11/2013 12:04:36 PM, Cermank wrote:
What are the prospects of an American being elected pope when 115 cardinals from around the world solemnly enter the frescoed splendor of the Vatican"s Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to begin the voting process known as the conclave?

Until recently, the received wisdom was that the Roman Catholic Church would never accept a pontiff from the world"s only superpower on the grounds that the United States already had quite enough temporal power.

There has also been concern that having an American pope could give the impression that the Vatican had embraced a pro-Washington bias, hindering the Catholic Church"s efforts to engage in tangled international issues such as the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the spread of militant Islam and poverty alleviation.

But with the end of the cold war and US hegemony declining, those concerns appear to have diminished, because the buzz in Rome is that at least two American cardinals have a fighting chance of being elected the successor to St. Peter this week.

They are Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the charismatic archbishop of New York, and Cardinal Sean Patrick O"Malley, the archbishop of Boston.

When Corriere della Sera, one of Italy"s leading daily newspapers, canvassed eight Vatican analysts and asked them to nominate their top three papal contenders at the weekend, Cardinal O"Malley was by far the most popular choice.

He comfortably beat Odilo Pedro Scherer of Brazil and Angelo Scola of Italy, widely perceived to be two of the strongest candidates for the top job.

I think that the nationality of the next pontiff should be the least of the Roman Catholic Church's concerns. At any rate, whoever he turns out to be will probably make little difference from a social justice and human liberation point of view. That is, he probably won't be someone who will explicitly embrace the preferential option for the poor and therefore won't be a true history maker in any enlightened way, shape, or fashion.

So the new pope has to discriminate against anyone who is not poor to be enlightened?
"Politics is supposed to be the second-oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first." -Ronald Reagan

"The notion of political correctness declares certain topics, certain ex<x>pressions even certain gestures off-limits. What began as a crusade for civility has soured into a cause of conflict and even censorship." -George H.W. Bush
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/12/2013 3:31:36 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/12/2013 4:53:56 AM, tmar19652 wrote:
At 3/11/2013 2:01:40 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 3/11/2013 12:04:36 PM, Cermank wrote:
What are the prospects of an American being elected pope when 115 cardinals from around the world solemnly enter the frescoed splendor of the Vatican"s Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to begin the voting process known as the conclave?

Until recently, the received wisdom was that the Roman Catholic Church would never accept a pontiff from the world"s only superpower on the grounds that the United States already had quite enough temporal power.

There has also been concern that having an American pope could give the impression that the Vatican had embraced a pro-Washington bias, hindering the Catholic Church"s efforts to engage in tangled international issues such as the Israel-Palestinian conflict, the spread of militant Islam and poverty alleviation.

But with the end of the cold war and US hegemony declining, those concerns appear to have diminished, because the buzz in Rome is that at least two American cardinals have a fighting chance of being elected the successor to St. Peter this week.

They are Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the charismatic archbishop of New York, and Cardinal Sean Patrick O"Malley, the archbishop of Boston.

When Corriere della Sera, one of Italy"s leading daily newspapers, canvassed eight Vatican analysts and asked them to nominate their top three papal contenders at the weekend, Cardinal O"Malley was by far the most popular choice.

He comfortably beat Odilo Pedro Scherer of Brazil and Angelo Scola of Italy, widely perceived to be two of the strongest candidates for the top job.

I think that the nationality of the next pontiff should be the least of the Roman Catholic Church's concerns. At any rate, whoever he turns out to be will probably make little difference from a social justice and human liberation point of view. That is, he probably won't be someone who will explicitly embrace the preferential option for the poor and therefore won't be a true history maker in any enlightened way, shape, or fashion.

So the new pope has to discriminate against anyone who is not poor to be enlightened?

Absolutely. Authentic enlightenment stems from and is compassion, and compassion discriminates in favor of the poor, in favor of the powerless, in favor of underdogs, not in favor of the fat cats who prey upon them. Enlightenment, that is, is most certainly not a product of objectivity and wertfreiheit; rather, it's a matter of cultivating a point of view that's informed by the ethics of empathy and social caring, that's sensitively skewed in the direction of ontological and moral truths such as the social-relational nature of reality, the sanctity of human life, and the intrinsic entitlement of every human being to actualize his/her full potential. In short, enlightenment most definitely and unequivocally involves what the Catholics term a preferential option for the poor.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.