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Are not having epipens a real issue?

paigeb
Posts: 20
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1/1/2014 2:53:53 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I hear schools do not have epipens and some states are requiring schools to have 10-15 available in case of an allergic reaction or emergency. I am not sure, but are kids really endanger? How many times does this happen where a kid does not have an epipen and is in a life threatening problem in school?
Paige
slo1
Posts: 4,330
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1/1/2014 10:37:36 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/1/2014 2:53:53 PM, paigeb wrote:
I hear schools do not have epipens and some states are requiring schools to have 10-15 available in case of an allergic reaction or emergency. I am not sure, but are kids really endanger? How many times does this happen where a kid does not have an epipen and is in a life threatening problem in school?

I think when I buy two epipens I think it is $400 or $500 bucks. It is rather cheap to have them around and it can save lives. it is the only thing that will save a life while waiting for an ambulance if someone has a severe allergic reaction.

It would be silly not to have them, especially when kids eat a meal at school. The second link below has bullet that 400k kids under 18 per year. Of course not all at school, but probably a good number of them are.

http://abcnews.go.com...

http://www.foodallergy.org...
paigeb
Posts: 20
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1/2/2014 4:51:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/1/2014 10:37:36 PM, slo1 wrote:
At 1/1/2014 2:53:53 PM, paigeb wrote:
I hear schools do not have epipens and some states are requiring schools to have 10-15 available in case of an allergic reaction or emergency. I am not sure, but are kids really endanger? How many times does this happen where a kid does not have an epipen and is in a life threatening problem in school?

I think when I buy two epipens I think it is $400 or $500 bucks. It is rather cheap to have them around and it can save lives. it is the only thing that will save a life while waiting for an ambulance if someone has a severe allergic reaction.

It would be silly not to have them, especially when kids eat a meal at school. The second link below has bullet that 400k kids under 18 per year. Of course not all at school, but probably a good number of them are.

http://abcnews.go.com...

http://www.foodallergy.org...

I am not agreeing or disagreeing with you, but I am just going to ask some questions.
Would it be a problem that teachers and officials would be too timid to use it or just not know how?
Isn't the budget of public schools very strict, and the cost of 10 epipens would be close to $2500?
Also, just a question. I am honestly not sure, so please do not think it is a stupid question, but is there an expiration date and would the schools have to replenish supplies after a certain time frame?
Would parents then not require their kids to carry epipens or even buy them since schools would have them? (all I am asking is if it is possible)

I am just trying to look at both sides of the argument. Thank you!
Paige
slo1
Posts: 4,330
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1/2/2014 5:10:19 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/2/2014 4:51:13 PM, paigeb wrote:
At 1/1/2014 10:37:36 PM, slo1 wrote:
At 1/1/2014 2:53:53 PM, paigeb wrote:
I hear schools do not have epipens and some states are requiring schools to have 10-15 available in case of an allergic reaction or emergency. I am not sure, but are kids really endanger? How many times does this happen where a kid does not have an epipen and is in a life threatening problem in school?

I think when I buy two epipens I think it is $400 or $500 bucks. It is rather cheap to have them around and it can save lives. it is the only thing that will save a life while waiting for an ambulance if someone has a severe allergic reaction.

It would be silly not to have them, especially when kids eat a meal at school. The second link below has bullet that 400k kids under 18 per year. Of course not all at school, but probably a good number of them are.

http://abcnews.go.com...

http://www.foodallergy.org...

I am not agreeing or disagreeing with you, but I am just going to ask some questions.
Would it be a problem that teachers and officials would be too timid to use it or just not know how?

- It is a 2 minute session to teach someone how to use it. If one never saw an epipen, they lable it very well with instructions and a person could figure it out in 30 seconds. Take a cap off and just slam it on the persons thigh and the device does all the rest.

Isn't the budget of public schools very strict, and the cost of 10 epipens would be close to $2500?

That is in the ball park.

Also, just a question. I am honestly not sure, so please do not think it is a stupid question, but is there an expiration date and would the schools have to replenish supplies after a certain time frame?

They are good for about a year, so they would be annual purchases.

Would parents then not require their kids to carry epipens or even buy them since schools would have them? (all I am asking is if it is possible)

Kids are not allowed to carry medicine in schools. As you could see in the post of the girl who died from a peanut allergy, the mother had an epipen with the school nurse and instructions to use it if she had an allergic reaction. They wouldn't do it. Why? who knows.

I am just trying to look at both sides of the argument. Thank you!

I can't imagine a school would have a hard time coming up with $2,500 especially with financial incentives from the Fed.
dtaylor971
Posts: 1,907
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1/7/2014 1:25:38 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
No... we have bigger problems than epipens...

AIDS
Hunger
Thirst
AIDS
Debt
War
AIDS
Education
Environment

and some more AIDS
"I don't know why gays want to marry, I have spent the last 25 years wishing I wasn't allowed to." -Sadolite