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Save water by replacing lawns with hot turf?

summereagle
Posts: 1
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7/7/2015 10:35:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Governor Brown has been promoting financial benefits for those who will replace their lawns with artificial turf but anyone who watched the Women's World Cup games would know that the temperature for the day was 80 degrees but the turf heated surrounding areas to 150 degrees! This may save on water but it will increase the need for energy to the air conditioners as people struggle to maintain a comfortable in-home condition.

The other option is to just let the lawns die but they have yet to tell the public that there are six drought-resistant grasses that meet the regulations on conserving water...many people may actually have one of these grasses and not even know it. Before you kill off your lawn, find out what type it is so you can make an informed decision.
FaustianJustice
Posts: 6,237
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7/10/2015 1:23:09 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/7/2015 10:35:04 PM, summereagle wrote:
Governor Brown has been promoting financial benefits for those who will replace their lawns with artificial turf but anyone who watched the Women's World Cup games would know that the temperature for the day was 80 degrees but the turf heated surrounding areas to 150 degrees! This may save on water but it will increase the need for energy to the air conditioners as people struggle to maintain a comfortable in-home condition.

The other option is to just let the lawns die but they have yet to tell the public that there are six drought-resistant grasses that meet the regulations on conserving water...many people may actually have one of these grasses and not even know it. Before you kill off your lawn, find out what type it is so you can make an informed decision.

My state offers incentive to "zero-scape" the lawn. That being you are offered credit to your sewage bill if you land scape your lawn with 100% local vegetation that requires only the local climate in order to thrive. This would mean drought resistant grasses, large leafy plants, certain shrubs and the like. This particular arrangement, much to the chagrin of some planned developments, trumps HOA agreements. A member of the HOA controlled community does not need to abide by whatever landscape requirements the HOA sets provided it uses no water from the rural water supply and is locally found flora.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
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Blade-of-Truth
Posts: 5,036
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7/12/2015 2:45:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/10/2015 1:23:09 AM, FaustianJustice wrote:
At 7/7/2015 10:35:04 PM, summereagle wrote:
Governor Brown has been promoting financial benefits for those who will replace their lawns with artificial turf but anyone who watched the Women's World Cup games would know that the temperature for the day was 80 degrees but the turf heated surrounding areas to 150 degrees! This may save on water but it will increase the need for energy to the air conditioners as people struggle to maintain a comfortable in-home condition.

The other option is to just let the lawns die but they have yet to tell the public that there are six drought-resistant grasses that meet the regulations on conserving water...many people may actually have one of these grasses and not even know it. Before you kill off your lawn, find out what type it is so you can make an informed decision.

My state offers incentive to "zero-scape" the lawn. That being you are offered credit to your sewage bill if you land scape your lawn with 100% local vegetation that requires only the local climate in order to thrive. This would mean drought resistant grasses, large leafy plants, certain shrubs and the like. This particular arrangement, much to the chagrin of some planned developments, trumps HOA agreements. A member of the HOA controlled community does not need to abide by whatever landscape requirements the HOA sets provided it uses no water from the rural water supply and is locally found flora.

I wish every state would adopt that incentive.
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Greyparrot
Posts: 14,314
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7/13/2015 1:40:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/7/2015 10:35:04 PM, summereagle wrote:
Governor Brown has been promoting financial benefits for those who will replace their lawns with artificial turf but anyone who watched the Women's World Cup games would know that the temperature for the day was 80 degrees but the turf heated surrounding areas to 150 degrees! This may save on water but it will increase the need for energy to the air conditioners as people struggle to maintain a comfortable in-home condition.

The other option is to just let the lawns die but they have yet to tell the public that there are six drought-resistant grasses that meet the regulations on conserving water...many people may actually have one of these grasses and not even know it. Before you kill off your lawn, find out what type it is so you can make an informed decision.

There are many non-rubber turf options available. Your lawn doesn't have to meet arena sport standards.
Huntress
Posts: 60
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8/23/2015 1:05:56 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I wouldn't want hot turf that could burn someone. That's a law suit waiting to happen.
I'd suggest Zoysia grass or Bermuda. They look nice, have no downsides really and require less water.
LawnDart
Posts: 9
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9/3/2015 3:44:42 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
You would think a state that has rather large and destructive fires on a quarterly basis would not encourage people to create fire hazards by letting their lawns die without at least requiring them to be dug up or paved over. I'd be curious to see how much water is typically expended fighting these ridiculous infernos, in relation to how much water would be saved not watering lawns between disasters.

As a side note, SHAME ON YOU LOS ANGELES! You've drank entire lakes and rivers dry in the Mojave Desert! Do something about your population, you're an embarrassment.

As for the artificial turf, I wouldn't recommend it. It gets pretty hot and presents a huge legal liability if someone steps on it barefoot and gets 2nd degree burns. Better off doing an uninviting zeroscape.