Total Posts:16|Showing Posts:1-16
Jump to topic:

Would you take a job if....?

PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/15/2011 10:54:07 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I've been propositioned recently with a job opportunity that is both attractive and unattractive. It's to work as a roughneck in West Texas oil fields which, as you can probably imagine, does not appeal to me on a fulfilling level.

CON's: Hotter than hell, 12-hour work days, brutal manual labor, in the middle of nowhere, an industry that is on the decline, 6 hours away from home, minimum of 6-month contract, dangerous work conditions

PRO's: 80k (starting pay), easy advancement to less dangerous and higher paying job, 7 days on - 7 days OFF.

The job itself doesn't appeal to me, but the money and the time off certainly does.

What would you do?
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
quarterexchange
Posts: 1,549
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/15/2011 10:57:00 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Do you have a family and kids to support? If so, it'd probably be better to take the higher paying job to prepare for college and the fact that you have a week off for every week of work means you'll be able to spend more time with them.
I don't discriminate....I hate everybody.
PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/15/2011 11:59:40 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/15/2011 10:57:00 AM, quarterexchange wrote:
Do you have a family and kids to support? If so, it'd probably be better to take the higher paying job to prepare for college and the fact that you have a week off for every week of work means you'll be able to spend more time with them.:

Yes, to all of the above. I'm leaning more towards taking the job. Starting 80k with 7 days off is very attractive.
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
innomen
Posts: 10,052
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/15/2011 5:00:39 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/15/2011 11:59:40 AM, PARADIGM_L0ST wrote:
At 10/15/2011 10:57:00 AM, quarterexchange wrote:
Do you have a family and kids to support? If so, it'd probably be better to take the higher paying job to prepare for college and the fact that you have a week off for every week of work means you'll be able to spend more time with them.:

Yes, to all of the above. I'm leaning more towards taking the job. Starting 80k with 7 days off is very attractive.

I think the key would be the advancement. If there is real opportunity for a future, where you won't be doing physical work for the next 10 years, I think it's worth the short term sacrifice. You're a bright guy, and I'm sure you come across well, so I'm guessing that moving up would be easy.

I have come to not like my job much lately. I have never really identified myself with my job as many people do, it's always been a means to an end. I have made good money, although not so much now, and I'm pretty good at it, but i don't really like it. If you can do it, and you can do it well, and make a decent living of it, then it serves its purpose, and knowing that it's only a small part of who i am, if anything of who i am, is what keeps my mind growing. I think you're kind of like that, you can take a job that serves its purpose, but it certainly doesn't define you.
BlackVoid
Posts: 9,170
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/16/2011 12:57:01 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Obviously, a lot of people here have more work experience than I do and thus might give a better evaluation. But I wouldn't take the job.

First, there's no such thing as a guaranteed advancement. There are plenty of instances where people deserving to get a raise or promotion don't get it. If your company starts to struggle for whatever reason, they're going to be reluctant to promote anyone. Considering the stress of the job and the toll it can take on your health, thats not a risk I would take.

Second, 12 hour workdays doing manual labor in the Texas heat. The stress will cause you to dread going into work every single day, and this can impact your personal life too. People who despise going to their job are at a higher risk for depression and any other medical problem you can think of.

Third, the 7-on 7-off schedule is going to destroy your body. If you're working for 7 days straight, manual labor, 12 hours a day, your muscles are going to get extremely sore and possibly damaged. They'll only have 8 hours of sleep, if that, to recover each night. But muscle recovery from psychical strain like this takes at least 24. Over a 7 day work week, something is going to get torn.

Fourth, 12 hour days mean you have 2 hours of free time in your whole day. If you factor in the 6 hour drive to the job each week, and the 6 hour drive back, it basically takes your whole day away. So really, you're truly living on just every other week, the one when you're off.

Fifth, dangerous work conditions? I wouldn't take any job with a risk of death or incapacitation.

Also, this is going to seem minor, but never underestimate the effects of sunburn.
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/16/2011 1:20:19 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/16/2011 12:57:01 AM, BlackVoid wrote:
Fifth, dangerous work conditions? I wouldn't take any job with a risk of death or incapacitation.

Say goodbye to every job that requires you to cross a busy street, whether on foot or in a vehicle.

Say goodbye to every sedentary job that gives you a chance of being a fat*** and clogging your arteries. (If you exercise off the job.... a lot of that can have risks too. And cut into the free time you were complaining about earlier. Any exercise that is going to be fun enough to count as sort of "Free time" is likely to be riskier yet.).

What's left?
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
Double_R
Posts: 4,886
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/16/2011 12:47:03 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
This sounds like it comes down to a question of short term vs. long term. In the short term you will have a very good salary to take care of your family and whatever other needs you have. But it sounds very unfulfilling making it something you certainly don't seem to want to do for the rest of your life.

I agree with Innomen that as long as there is real opportunity for advancement then it seems well worth it but I will caution you; As a supervisor/manager for ten years now it has been my experience that people in manuel labor jobs very rarely ever get promoted, except to another manuel labor job. Once you start working for an employer your resume seems to disappear as far as they are concerned and what you do for them seems to be all they look at. Yet in a manuel labor position you have no opportunity to prove that you can do anything but manuel labor. This could prove to be very difficult, unless you are a good a$$ kisser.

If you are comfortable with the advancement opportunities offered then it sounds like you have a short term and a long term fit. If not it sounds like a simple question of which is more important.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,289
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/16/2011 1:07:31 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/16/2011 1:20:19 AM, Ragnar_Rahl wrote:
At 10/16/2011 12:57:01 AM, BlackVoid wrote:
Fifth, dangerous work conditions? I wouldn't take any job with a risk of death or incapacitation.

Say goodbye to every job that requires you to cross a busy street, whether on foot or in a vehicle.

Say goodbye to every sedentary job that gives you a chance of being a fat*** and clogging your arteries. (If you exercise off the job.... a lot of that can have risks too. And cut into the free time you were complaining about earlier. Any exercise that is going to be fun enough to count as sort of "Free time" is likely to be riskier yet.).

What's left?

Oh give me a flying break ragnar.

I've worked on oceangoing tugboats, i know what real danger is. Trust me, that job is nowhere near as safe as walking in front of a moving bus.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/16/2011 9:33:30 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Sounds to me like honest work at good pay. I'd take it.

Danger on such jobs come mostly from losing focus on doing it right. Stay focused.

In that kind of job, talent is recognized. If you do well, there will be plenty of opportunity to advance.
wjmelements
Posts: 8,206
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/16/2011 9:35:58 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I'd check the liability regarding the danger and the degree to which the danger exists.
in the blink of an eye you finally see the light
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,289
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/17/2011 7:57:36 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/16/2011 9:33:30 PM, RoyLatham wrote:

Danger on such jobs come mostly from losing focus on doing it right. Stay focused.


Working with elements of unpredictable nature, like oil drilling and working on the ocean, are going to be risky regardless of how prepared you are. (hence the pay incentive). You can get hurt at any job by losing focus, even working a cash register.
PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2011 10:22:01 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/15/2011 5:00:39 PM, innomen wrote:
At 10/15/2011 11:59:40 AM, PARADIGM_L0ST wrote:
At 10/15/2011 10:57:00 AM, quarterexchange wrote:
Do you have a family and kids to support? If so, it'd probably be better to take the higher paying job to prepare for college and the fact that you have a week off for every week of work means you'll be able to spend more time with them.:

Yes, to all of the above. I'm leaning more towards taking the job. Starting 80k with 7 days off is very attractive.

I think the key would be the advancement. If there is real opportunity for a future, where you won't be doing physical work for the next 10 years, I think it's worth the short term sacrifice. You're a bright guy, and I'm sure you come across well, so I'm guessing that moving up would be easy.

I have come to not like my job much lately. I have never really identified myself with my job as many people do, it's always been a means to an end. I have made good money, although not so much now, and I'm pretty good at it, but i don't really like it. If you can do it, and you can do it well, and make a decent living of it, then it serves its purpose, and knowing that it's only a small part of who i am, if anything of who i am, is what keeps my mind growing. I think you're kind of like that, you can take a job that serves its purpose, but it certainly doesn't define you.:

This pretty much summarizes it. It's a means to an end, and honestly, the older I get the less sentimental and philosophical I become about attaining a job I love. I've struggled and toiled for years with jobs I thought would fulfill me on a personal level, but left me with a less than desirable wage. The older I get, the more I just want the money to provide the security my family needs and the means to have the time to pursue separate interests... like music.

Money doesn't solve all the problems in the world, but I'll be damned if it doesn't greatly help!
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/24/2011 1:39:16 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I think that the end-all be-all of whether or not you should take this position is with your wife, but here's what I think:

The most important issue is how quickly and easily you can advance to that better position and how valuable your experience in that position would be to a future careers you have in mind.

It seems there are too many risks here. First, there is the issue of becoming permanently disabled. Something as simple as a torn shoulder cuff, pinched nerve, or slipped disk can handicap you for life without making you eligible for disability compensation. In my mind, 80k a year is NOT worth a lifetime of pain, pills, and surgery. A sedentary job you hate that pays 40k a year in a stable field is far better than a physically demanding job you hate that pays 80k a year in an unstable field.

Safety aside, you would be working what is best described as a temporary job. The money is good, but what about the benefits? Also, It's a terrible job market, but money is worthless without stability. Even if your experience and the position holds over until you can get promoted, how long will that promotion last in this sinking industry? What if you become unemployed again during this, which is very possible?

I would advise you to do all you can to find a different job. The risk is not worth it with people dependent on you.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,289
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/24/2011 1:42:34 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/24/2011 1:39:16 PM, Kleptin wrote:
I think that the end-all be-all of whether or not you should take this position is with your wife, but here's what I think:

The most important issue is how quickly and easily you can advance to that better position and how valuable your experience in that position would be to a future careers you have in mind.

It seems there are too many risks here. First, there is the issue of becoming permanently disabled. Something as simple as a torn shoulder cuff, pinched nerve, or slipped disk can handicap you for life without making you eligible for disability compensation. In my mind, 80k a year is NOT worth a lifetime of pain, pills, and surgery. A sedentary job you hate that pays 40k a year in a stable field is far better than a physically demanding job you hate that pays 80k a year in an unstable field.

Safety aside, you would be working what is best described as a temporary job. The money is good, but what about the benefits? Also, It's a terrible job market, but money is worthless without stability. Even if your experience and the position holds over until you can get promoted, how long will that promotion last in this sinking industry? What if you become unemployed again during this, which is very possible?

I would advise you to do all you can to find a different job. The risk is not worth it with people dependent on you.

That's what happened to me Kleptin, I got too old to justify the risks working offshore, money be damned.
Ren
Posts: 7,102
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/24/2011 3:40:59 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Personally, I'd do it.

The benefits are very attractive, and I wouldn't trust them if they weren't for a fitting price.

If you have the physical capacity and cojones, go for it.