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Read my speech please.

Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 2:00:42 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I'm back, but not for long. I just wanted to ask if any of you could read this speech (its not finished yet) and give me some feedback. I need to present it January 4th.

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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12/28/2011 2:33:02 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Its pretty good, however, we need to know what kind of audience you're addressing. What you really need to worry about is how you say the speech, not necessarily what is in it. A crappy speech delivered powerfully can bring an audience to tears, and a top notch speech given adequately can bore people to death.

If you're addressing students:
Trim the opening story, use less sophisticated language, and make the speech captivating, funny, and concise.

If you're addressing adults:
The content of your speech is fine, just make sure when you deliver it, you say it with conviction and captivate the audience. Adjust the humor to their taste, and be convincing.

If this is an assignment for class:
Be a little clearer with the story. Make sure its very clearly structured and delivered logically. Ex. Start with the story, explain the problem you wish to address, explain what this problem is doing to the school/environment/region etc. that is negative, explain what you have done to fix it, what the audience can do to fix it. End with an extremely persuasive call to action. While delivering, make sure you're doing the common sense things, stand up straight, speak with good volume etc., and appear honest the entire time.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
sadolite
Posts: 8,839
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12/28/2011 2:54:52 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 2:00:42 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
I'm back, but not for long. I just wanted to ask if any of you could read this speech (its not finished yet) and give me some feedback. I need to present it January 4th.

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.

You are a non conformist and you are different. You want the overwhelming majority to kowtow to you. You represent less than 1 percent of the US population. But you want to force public sector entities to make special allowances just for you. Bring your lunch to school and don't go to steak houses. Why should we, the "overwhelming" majority have to kowtow to you. We the "overwhelming" majority think your dietary choice is odd. Why do you act surprised when people look at you funny when you go to a steak house and order a salad. Steak houses are for people who eat meat not vegetarians. Your life choices have consequences and outcomes both good and bad. You complaining about people looking at you funny in a steak house makes you sound like a shrew and also makes you fit the stereotype. Your whole argument "is" the stereotype that you profess not to be
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
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12/28/2011 5:43:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.:

Well, vegetarians often hold certain stereotypes for omni/carnivores too, so, it goes both ways.

there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.:

Being a vegetarian is not an easy thing, as it relates to ease of convenience, and even less convenient for vegans. That's just the way it goes. Gotta plan ahead all the time.
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 7:36:28 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 2:54:52 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/28/2011 2:00:42 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
I'm back, but not for long. I just wanted to ask if any of you could read this speech (its not finished yet) and give me some feedback. I need to present it January 4th.

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.

You are a non conformist and you are different. You want the overwhelming majority to kowtow to you. You represent less than 1 percent of the US population. But you want to force public sector entities to make special allowances just for you. Bring your lunch to school and don't go to steak houses. Why should we, the "overwhelming" majority have to kowtow to you. We the "overwhelming" majority think your dietary choice is odd. Why do you act surprised when people look at you funny when you go to a steak house and order a salad. Steak houses are for people who eat meat not vegetarians. Your life choices have consequences and outcomes both good and bad. You complaining about people looking at you funny in a steak house makes you sound like a shrew and also makes you fit the stereotype. Your whole argument "is" the stereotype that you profess not to be

I'm starting to think that you are some weird anti matter version of myself.
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 7:59:03 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 2:33:02 PM, 000ike wrote:
Its pretty good, however, we need to know what kind of audience you're addressing. What you really need to worry about is how you say the speech, not necessarily what is in it. A crappy speech delivered powerfully can bring an audience to tears, and a top notch speech given adequately can bore people to death.

If you're addressing students:
Trim the opening story, use less sophisticated language, and make the speech captivating, funny, and concise.

If you're addressing adults:
The content of your speech is fine, just make sure when you deliver it, you say it with conviction and captivate the audience. Adjust the humor to their taste, and be convincing.

If this is an assignment for class:
Be a little clearer with the story. Make sure its very clearly structured and delivered logically. Ex. Start with the story, explain the problem you wish to address, explain what this problem is doing to the school/environment/region etc. that is negative, explain what you have done to fix it, what the audience can do to fix it. End with an extremely persuasive call to action. While delivering, make sure you're doing the common sense things, stand up straight, speak with good volume etc., and appear honest the entire time.

I am addressing adults, but they are grading it.
Thanks for the feedback, while I am pretty comfortable at public speaking (2 years of debate league), its the content I'm most worried about. I'm afraid that its too funny, I'm trying to decide between a satirical view on the life of a vegetarian or more of an informative/persuasive speech.
UnStupendousMan
Posts: 3,475
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12/28/2011 8:01:01 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The main reason why becoming a true vegetarian is not really possible: roundworms are EVERYWHERE. Roundworms are microscopic animals that can be found just about anywhere. Anybody who wants to not eat meat must consider roundworms not meat or remove roundworms from all their food, which really is not possible.

My Biology I teacher, who is great, told us about this conundrum. Rocky-or other vegetarians-what do you think of this?
Rockylightning
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12/28/2011 8:05:44 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 8:01:01 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
The main reason why becoming a true vegetarian is not really possible: roundworms are EVERYWHERE. Roundworms are microscopic animals that can be found just about anywhere. Anybody who wants to not eat meat must consider roundworms not meat or remove roundworms from all their food, which really is not possible.

My Biology I teacher, who is great, told us about this conundrum. Rocky-or other vegetarians-what do you think of this?

I didn't abandon meat to avoid....roundworms.
UnStupendousMan
Posts: 3,475
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12/28/2011 8:28:04 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 8:05:44 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:01:01 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
The main reason why becoming a true vegetarian is not really possible: roundworms are EVERYWHERE. Roundworms are microscopic animals that can be found just about anywhere. Anybody who wants to not eat meat must consider roundworms not meat or remove roundworms from all their food, which really is not possible.

My Biology I teacher, who is great, told us about this conundrum. Rocky-or other vegetarians-what do you think of this?

I didn't abandon meat to avoid....roundworms.

For some reason, I started LOL-ing. And you always have the excuse of "if it has coelmate [misspelled that horribly] I wont eat it. Roundworms have psudocolmates, so I can eat them."
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 8:36:13 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 8:28:04 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:05:44 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:01:01 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
The main reason why becoming a true vegetarian is not really possible: roundworms are EVERYWHERE. Roundworms are microscopic animals that can be found just about anywhere. Anybody who wants to not eat meat must consider roundworms not meat or remove roundworms from all their food, which really is not possible.

My Biology I teacher, who is great, told us about this conundrum. Rocky-or other vegetarians-what do you think of this?

I didn't abandon meat to avoid....roundworms.

For some reason, I started LOL-ing. And you always have the excuse of "if it has coelmate [misspelled that horribly] I wont eat it. Roundworms have psudocolmates, so I can eat them."

What?
UnStupendousMan
Posts: 3,475
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12/28/2011 8:47:11 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 8:36:13 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:28:04 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:05:44 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:01:01 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
The main reason why becoming a true vegetarian is not really possible: roundworms are EVERYWHERE. Roundworms are microscopic animals that can be found just about anywhere. Anybody who wants to not eat meat must consider roundworms not meat or remove roundworms from all their food, which really is not possible.

My Biology I teacher, who is great, told us about this conundrum. Rocky-or other vegetarians-what do you think of this?

I didn't abandon meat to avoid....roundworms.

For some reason, I started LOL-ing. And you always have the excuse of "if it has coelmate [misspelled that horribly] I wont eat it. Roundworms have psudocolmates, so I can eat them."

What?

Disregard that I ever came across this thread, let alone post on it. Also: coelem is a closed space inside the body, but the gastrointestinal tract is still connected to the body; animals with psudocoelems, roundworms, have a closed space inside their body, but the gastrointestinal tract is not really connected to the rest of the body like coelemate do. Coelems often manifest themselves as blood vessels. Examples of roundworms include heartworms and tapeworms.
UnStupendousMan
Posts: 3,475
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12/28/2011 9:22:02 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 8:43:03 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
http://www.rense.com...

I would respond to this, but this thread would have to move to either the science or health pages.
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 9:24:27 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 9:22:02 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:43:03 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
http://www.rense.com...

I would respond to this, but this thread would have to move to either the science or health pages.

Create one.
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 9:58:07 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
REVISED:

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.
But why face these problems? Why join a tiny minority only to be shoved into stereotypes and have your choices limited?
Many scientists and researchers today are questioning whether humans naturally eat meat, or whether this trait developed as a result of certain conditions. Cardiologist William Roberts, editor in chief of The American Journal of Cardiology and medical director of the Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute at Baylor University Medical Center believes that humans are not biologically meant to eat meat. Humans share many traits with herbivores, and few with carnivores. For example, humans have very long digestive tracts, small mouths in relation to body size, and get vitamin C from their diets, while carnivores create it internally. Roberts contends that humans only began to eat meat during a cold period when plants were sparse. This time also corresponds to the age when humans started using tools, which could be used to hunt and cut meat. The consumption of meat during this time period benefited early humans in two ways: first, it provided a source of protein and fat that plants could not provide at the time, and second, it gave humans warm skins and furs that they could wear to survive in the cold weather.
Additionally, eating meat can contribute to many health problems. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, one of the world's most respected nutrition experts, has been able to make patients who were suffering from clogged arteries virtually "heart-attack proof" by putting them on healthy vegetarian diets and getting their cholesterol levels down below 150. Additionally, a study published in 2005 illustrated the link between animal products and heart problems. This study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, concluded that amongst the 29,000 participants, those who ate the most meat were the greatest risk for heart disease. Researchers also reported that a regular intake of protein from vegetable sources such as tofu, nuts, and beans lowers risk of heart disease by 30 percent. In fact, the majority people who live to be over 100 years old exercise often and rely on a vegetable based diet.
I'm not proposing a complete halt on meat consumption. People have been eating meat for countless generations, it would be foolish to stop completely at once. My goal, and the goal of countless others, is the spread of ideas. To increase awareness of a vegetable based diet so that maybe one day, the population as a whole can inch away from animal consumption. But until then, I'm the guy who orders a salad. Thank you.
UnStupendousMan
Posts: 3,475
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12/28/2011 10:07:39 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 9:24:27 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 9:22:02 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:43:03 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
http://www.rense.com...

I would respond to this, but this thread would have to move to either the science or health pages.

Create one.

I am currently in the process of formulating it.
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/28/2011 10:11:54 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 10:07:39 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
At 12/28/2011 9:24:27 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 9:22:02 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
At 12/28/2011 8:43:03 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
http://www.rense.com...

I would respond to this, but this thread would have to move to either the science or health pages.

Create one.

I am currently in the process of formulating it.
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
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12/28/2011 11:16:58 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
You have a few problems with grammar/style but I don't know how perfect it has to be. One that really stands out to me is

At 12/28/2011 2:00:42 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there is an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu.

As opposed to "there are an incredibly low number", but even that sounds awkward. You might want to say instead "There are incredibly few vegetarian options available".
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/29/2011 7:33:52 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 11:16:58 PM, nonentity wrote:
You have a few problems with grammar/style but I don't know how perfect it has to be. One that really stands out to me is

At 12/28/2011 2:00:42 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there is an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu.

As opposed to "there are an incredibly low number", but even that sounds awkward. You might want to say instead "There are incredibly few vegetarian options available".

Thanks. Adding.
sadolite
Posts: 8,839
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12/29/2011 10:12:15 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 7:59:03 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 12/28/2011 2:33:02 PM, 000ike wrote:
Its pretty good, however, we need to know what kind of audience you're addressing. What you really need to worry about is how you say the speech, not necessarily what is in it. A crappy speech delivered powerfully can bring an audience to tears, and a top notch speech given adequately can bore people to death.

If you're addressing students:
Trim the opening story, use less sophisticated language, and make the speech captivating, funny, and concise.

Go with the satirical, the other choice will be a big turn off to the vast majority, Yawn

If you're addressing adults:
The content of your speech is fine, just make sure when you deliver it, you say it with conviction and captivate the audience. Adjust the humor to their taste, and be convincing.

If this is an assignment for class:
Be a little clearer with the story. Make sure its very clearly structured and delivered logically. Ex. Start with the story, explain the problem you wish to address, explain what this problem is doing to the school/environment/region etc. that is negative, explain what you have done to fix it, what the audience can do to fix it. End with an extremely persuasive call to action. While delivering, make sure you're doing the common sense things, stand up straight, speak with good volume etc., and appear honest the entire time.

I am addressing adults, but they are grading it.
Thanks for the feedback, while I am pretty comfortable at public speaking (2 years of debate league), its the content I'm most worried about. I'm afraid that its too funny, I'm trying to decide between a satirical view on the life of a vegetarian or more of an informative/persuasive speech.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
sadolite
Posts: 8,839
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12/29/2011 10:20:09 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 9:58:07 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
REVISED:

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.
But why face these problems? Why join a tiny minority only to be shoved into stereotypes and have your choices limited?
Many scientists and researchers today are questioning whether humans naturally eat meat, or whether this trait developed as a result of certain conditions. Cardiologist William Roberts, editor in chief of The American Journal of Cardiology and medical director of the Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute at Baylor University Medical Center believes that humans are not biologically meant to eat meat. Humans share many traits with herbivores, and few with carnivores. For example, humans have very long digestive tracts, small mouths in relation to body size, and get vitamin C from their diets, while carnivores create it internally. Roberts contends that humans only began to eat meat during a cold period when plants were sparse. This time also corresponds to the age when humans started using tools, which could be used to hunt and cut meat. The consumption of meat during this time period benefited early humans in two ways: first, it provided a source of protein and fat that plants could not provide at the time, and second, it gave humans warm skins and furs that they could wear to survive in the cold weather.
Additionally, eating meat can contribute to many health problems. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, one of the world's most respected nutrition experts, has been able to make patients who were suffering from clogged arteries virtually "heart-attack proof" by putting them on healthy vegetarian diets and getting their cholesterol levels down below 150. Additionally, a study published in 2005 illustrated the link between animal products and heart problems. This study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, concluded that amongst the 29,000 participants, those who ate the most meat were the greatest risk for heart disease. Researchers also reported that a regular intake of protein from vegetable sources such as tofu, nuts, and beans lowers risk of heart disease by 30 percent. In fact, the majority people who live to be over 100 years old exercise often and rely on a vegetable based diet.
I'm not proposing a complete halt on meat consumption. People have been eating meat for countless generations, it would be foolish to stop completely at once. My goal, and the goal of countless others, is the spread of ideas. To increase awareness of a vegetable based diet so that maybe one day, the population as a whole can inch away from animal consumption. But until then, I'm the guy who orders a salad. Thank you.

"So that mabey one day people will inch away from animal consumption"

What friken business is it of yours what other people eat. Damn! You are the opitomy of the vegan sterotype
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
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12/30/2011 1:22:10 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/29/2011 10:20:09 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 12/28/2011 9:58:07 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
REVISED:

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.
But why face these problems? Why join a tiny minority only to be shoved into stereotypes and have your choices limited?
Many scientists and researchers today are questioning whether humans naturally eat meat, or whether this trait developed as a result of certain conditions. Cardiologist William Roberts, editor in chief of The American Journal of Cardiology and medical director of the Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute at Baylor University Medical Center believes that humans are not biologically meant to eat meat. Humans share many traits with herbivores, and few with carnivores. For example, humans have very long digestive tracts, small mouths in relation to body size, and get vitamin C from their diets, while carnivores create it internally. Roberts contends that humans only began to eat meat during a cold period when plants were sparse. This time also corresponds to the age when humans started using tools, which could be used to hunt and cut meat. The consumption of meat during this time period benefited early humans in two ways: first, it provided a source of protein and fat that plants could not provide at the time, and second, it gave humans warm skins and furs that they could wear to survive in the cold weather.
Additionally, eating meat can contribute to many health problems. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, one of the world's most respected nutrition experts, has been able to make patients who were suffering from clogged arteries virtually "heart-attack proof" by putting them on healthy vegetarian diets and getting their cholesterol levels down below 150. Additionally, a study published in 2005 illustrated the link between animal products and heart problems. This study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, concluded that amongst the 29,000 participants, those who ate the most meat were the greatest risk for heart disease. Researchers also reported that a regular intake of protein from vegetable sources such as tofu, nuts, and beans lowers risk of heart disease by 30 percent. In fact, the majority people who live to be over 100 years old exercise often and rely on a vegetable based diet.
I'm not proposing a complete halt on meat consumption. People have been eating meat for countless generations, it would be foolish to stop completely at once. My goal, and the goal of countless others, is the spread of ideas. To increase awareness of a vegetable based diet so that maybe one day, the population as a whole can inch away from animal consumption. But until then, I'm the guy who orders a salad. Thank you.


"So that mabey one day people will inch away from animal consumption"

What friken business is it of yours what other people eat. Damn! You are the opitomy of the vegan sterotype

1. I'm not vegan.
2. Its everyone who lives on this earth's business. If I eat dead baby, I think you'd care. Wait, never mind you wouldn't.
3. You spelled maybe "mabey".
seraine
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1/9/2012 6:12:12 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 12/28/2011 9:58:07 PM, Rockylightning wrote:
REVISED:

Imagine: You and your friends are ordering food at a restaurant. The waiter has already taken your friends orders and turns to you, where you manage to state, "I'll have a salad". Everyone at the table turns their heads with bewildered looks stating "This is a steak house" to which you must reply, "And I'm a vegetarian". You are the only one at the table with anything green on their plate and everybody else has a steaming hunk of meat. To a vegetarian, this instance is all too common. Myself and my 7.3 million american vegetarians comrades face this awkward social situation very often, creating a stereotypical image of a "hipster" or "nonconformist" even though people become vegetarians for a multitude of reasons: religion, ethics, upbringing, health, or personal taste are all reasons why people choose to become vegetarians, yet we are all pigeon holed into one single stereotype.
More importantly however are some practical conundrums that we herbivores face. For example, in my entire school district, there are an incredibly low number of vegetarian options on the school lunch menu. Some days of the week, the only options available have meat in it. Even the caesar salads are sprinkled with chicken. This problem leaves us lining up at the vending machines to watch chips, pastries, and other packaged trash fall into our hands. Luckily, in recent months a group of dedicated vegetarians at my school have petitioned for more vegetarian options, and the school has complied for the most part.
But why face these problems? Why join a tiny minority only to be shoved into stereotypes and have your choices limited?
Many scientists and researchers today are questioning whether humans naturally eat meat, or whether this trait developed as a result of certain conditions. Cardiologist William Roberts, editor in chief of The American Journal of Cardiology and medical director of the Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute at Baylor University Medical Center believes that humans are not biologically meant to eat meat. Humans share many traits with herbivores, and few with carnivores. For example, humans have very long digestive tracts, small mouths in relation to body size, and get vitamin C from their diets, while carnivores create it internally. Roberts contends that humans only began to eat meat during a cold period when plants were sparse. This time also corresponds to the age when humans started using tools, which could be used to hunt and cut meat. The consumption of meat during this time period benefited early humans in two ways: first, it provided a source of protein and fat that plants could not provide at the time, and second, it gave humans warm skins and furs that they could wear to survive in the cold weather.
Additionally, eating meat can contribute to many health problems. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, one of the world's most respected nutrition experts, has been able to make patients who were suffering from clogged arteries virtually "heart-attack proof" by putting them on healthy vegetarian diets and getting their cholesterol levels down below 150 (150 what?). Additionally (Choose a different word) , a study published in 2005 illustrated the link between animal products and heart problems. This study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, concluded that amongst the 29,000 participants, those who ate the most meat were the greatest risk for heart disease. Researchers also reported that a regular intake of protein from vegetable sources such as tofu, nuts, and beans lowers risk of heart disease by 30 percent. In fact, the majority people who live to be over 100 years old exercise often and rely on a vegetable based diet.
I'm not proposing a complete halt on meat consumption. People have been eating meat for countless generations, it would be foolish to stop completely at once. My goal, and the goal of countless others, is the spread of ideas. To increase awareness of a vegetable based diet so that maybe one day, the population as a whole can inch away from animal consumption. But until then, I'm the guy who orders a salad. Thank you.

I think you should look into the ethical aspects. It reads like you are giving an ad for some sort of health diet.