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Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,484
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3/28/2013 10:14:24 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I've been feeling really shitty this week; cooking often makes me feel better. It's simple and intuitive, and I don't have to speak a word during the process. I suspect everything probably has their little thing, and making food is mine. I went to the store to pick up a few supplies, and I made a pretty dank baked stir-fry sort of dish. I chopped up and marinated some chicken (sections were like 1-1.5 cubic inches) in various sauces and spices; I cooked a few strips of bacon (crispy) and crumbled them by hand. Setting those aside for a bit, I heated up my saute pan, melting some butter and pre-cooking some baby spinach and sugar snap peas, adding in grated Muenster and Swiss cheeses. Completing this, I heated up my wok, threw in some olive oil, and fried it up with some soy sauce and spices. As it cooked, a nice liquid base accumulated in the bottom. I decided to add a little extra fresh spinach. Not wanting to lose the benefit of the liquid, I quickly transferred to a baking pan (covered with punctured foil), turning the oven to 375. I also grated a little more Muenster, throwing that on top to melt over during the last phase. Finishing that, I topped with a little savory, some ginger, and some paprika, and drizzled just a bit of some honey dijon dressing.

It's pretty good, and I feel warm.
YYW
Posts: 36,391
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3/28/2013 10:17:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/28/2013 10:14:24 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I've been feeling really shitty this week; cooking often makes me feel better.

As a person, your stock with me (which was already high) just went through the roof. What do you like to cook?

It's simple and intuitive, and I don't have to speak a word during the process. I suspect everything probably has their little thing, and making food is mine. I went to the store to pick up a few supplies, and I made a pretty dank baked stir-fry sort of dish. I chopped up and marinated some chicken (sections were like 1-1.5 cubic inches) in various sauces and spices; I cooked a few strips of bacon (crispy) and crumbled them by hand. Setting those aside for a bit, I heated up my saute pan, melting some butter and pre-cooking some baby spinach and sugar snap peas, adding in grated Muenster and Swiss cheeses. Completing this, I heated up my wok, threw in some olive oil, and fried it up with some soy sauce and spices. As it cooked, a nice liquid base accumulated in the bottom. I decided to add a little extra fresh spinach. Not wanting to lose the benefit of the liquid, I quickly transferred to a baking pan (covered with punctured foil), turning the oven to 375. I also grated a little more Muenster, throwing that on top to melt over during the last phase. Finishing that, I topped with a little savory, some ginger, and some paprika, and drizzled just a bit of some honey dijon dressing.

It's pretty good, and I feel warm.

I'm glad you feel better. Cooking is therapeutic, for sure. I've got a TON of recipes if you'd like, btw. I'm kind of a whore for French (my recipie for Coq a Vin will blow your mind) and Italian food, but I can cook almost anything (other than Asian or Mexican food). I've never been successful with that.
Tsar of DDO
phantom
Posts: 6,774
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3/28/2013 10:25:19 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Nice. If my tastebuds weren't already sick with the taste of quadruply strong disgusting coffee, this would probably make me feel hungry.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,484
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3/28/2013 10:29:21 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/28/2013 10:17:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/28/2013 10:14:24 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I've been feeling really shitty this week; cooking often makes me feel better.

As a person, your stock with me (which was already high) just went through the roof. What do you like to cook?

I usually just make stuff up. As a result, I can cook more or less anything. My method while cooking is pretty haphazard, but I try to plan beforehand what I want to do--what ingredients, what method (saute, braising, stir fry, pressure cooker, etc.), order of combination, etc. Cooking is one activity where I rely explicitly on intuition and experience. tl;dr I cook more or less whatever. My intuition guides me based on whatever ingredients present themselves, so my experience is more about planned improvisation than finding a recipe and acquiring ingredients as a secondary. I had a neighbor for a while who had been the head chef on a luxury cruise liner, so I'd just go over and develop my interest in cooking (which had existed since I was a kid). Like, we cooked this stew one time in which the main ingredient was cow tongue. Fuckin' awesome.

It's simple and intuitive, and I don't have to speak a word during the process. I suspect everything probably has their little thing, and making food is mine. I went to the store to pick up a few supplies, and I made a pretty dank baked stir-fry sort of dish. I chopped up and marinated some chicken (sections were like 1-1.5 cubic inches) in various sauces and spices; I cooked a few strips of bacon (crispy) and crumbled them by hand. Setting those aside for a bit, I heated up my saute pan, melting some butter and pre-cooking some baby spinach and sugar snap peas, adding in grated Muenster and Swiss cheeses. Completing this, I heated up my wok, threw in some olive oil, and fried it up with some soy sauce and spices. As it cooked, a nice liquid base accumulated in the bottom. I decided to add a little extra fresh spinach. Not wanting to lose the benefit of the liquid, I quickly transferred to a baking pan (covered with punctured foil), turning the oven to 375. I also grated a little more Muenster, throwing that on top to melt over during the last phase. Finishing that, I topped with a little savory, some ginger, and some paprika, and drizzled just a bit of some honey dijon dressing.

It's pretty good, and I feel warm.

I'm glad you feel better. Cooking is therapeutic, for sure. I've got a TON of recipes if you'd like, btw. I'm kind of a whore for French (my recipie for Coq a Vin will blow your mind) and Italian food, but I can cook almost anything (other than Asian or Mexican food). I've never been successful with that.

I'd love to get a sense of what your style is--I'm actually more interested in techniques you've come across of rules of thumb that you've useful. I'm the sort of guy that gets some tools and materials and builds something, rather than the sort that gets a blueprint before going to Home Depot.

I dunno, man. If I wasn't going to university for stuff, I'd definitely sign on for culinary school.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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3/28/2013 10:34:12 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I love it as well. Boeuf bourguignon takes forever, but the whole process is therapeutic and it's probably my favorite dish to make. I especially like cooking with food that I've grown myself, and usually go crazy with it in late summer/fall. Harvesting, trimming, and cutting up vegetables on a nice day is practically a meditative experience.

I also have a thing for mixing drinks; it's kind of sad how far the art has degenerated.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,484
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3/28/2013 10:42:50 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/28/2013 10:34:12 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
I love it as well. Boeuf bourguignon takes forever, but the whole process is therapeutic and it's probably my favorite dish to make. I especially like cooking with food that I've grown myself, and usually go crazy with it in late summer/fall. Harvesting, trimming, and cutting up vegetables on a nice day is practically a meditative experience.

I wish I had a garden. I really like slow-cook dishes, though. There's something about slowly nurturing a course all day, serving it to a group of close friends or something--it's almost like the whole day is perfectly suspended in time. I think you're right to call it meditative.

I also have a thing for mixing drinks; it's kind of sad how far the art has degenerated.

Word. I have some bartender friends, but I'm only 20, so I don't really have the capacity to stock my liquor cabinet to the extent necessary to be good at mixing.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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3/29/2013 5:28:45 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/28/2013 10:42:50 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
At 3/28/2013 10:34:12 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
I love it as well. Boeuf bourguignon takes forever, but the whole process is therapeutic and it's probably my favorite dish to make. I especially like cooking with food that I've grown myself, and usually go crazy with it in late summer/fall. Harvesting, trimming, and cutting up vegetables on a nice day is practically a meditative experience.

I wish I had a garden. I really like slow-cook dishes, though. There's something about slowly nurturing a course all day, serving it to a group of close friends or something--it's almost like the whole day is perfectly suspended in time. I think you're right to call it meditative.

By far the most helpful of my gardens is the herb garden, and most of them aren't that hard to grow. If you ever start one, start there!

I also have a thing for mixing drinks; it's kind of sad how far the art has degenerated.

Word. I have some bartender friends, but I'm only 20, so I don't really have the capacity to stock my liquor cabinet to the extent necessary to be good at mixing.

Ah, mine's pretty full, but it's only because I've stocked up for a few years. I just started simple and slowly expanded. As my tastes shifted I accumulated enough liquor to make Zombies and other complex tiki drinks. My biggest advice to anyone setting our it to avoid the popular, mid-priced 'party brand' liquors - they're usually sub-par, and the good stuff doesn't cost that much more. And rely on liqueurs, fruit juice, and other things for flavoring, not flavored liquor or nasty syrup mixes.

Furthermore, if you want to come up with your own drinks then the classic punch recipe works great as template:

One part sour
Two parts sweet
Three parts strong
Four parts weak

Lastly: Make your own grenadine!!!
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Zaradi
Posts: 14,127
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3/29/2013 10:47:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I just had dinner but this thread made me hungry again.

DAMM YOU! YOU ALL WILL MAKE ME FAT!
Want to debate? Pick a topic and hit me up! - http://www.debate.org...
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,484
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4/16/2013 1:19:43 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Lunch today:

Browned some lean beef in a saute pan, added assorted spices (e.g., ginger, paprika, chili powder) and sauces (e.g., tabasco, worcestershire) to taste; minced orange/red bell peppers, threw them in with a little salt and pepper after browning; after a minute or two, I also added a handful of baby spinach on top and a little rosemary. Once the spinach was well-blended into the dish, I stirred in a delicious blue cheese dressing (perfect, I thought, for offsetting the spiciness), put the top on, and let it simmer a couple.

Dank.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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4/16/2013 5:11:05 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I just made Bananas Foster. I never get sick of it, and it's so easy. 4 tablespoons of butter, four tablespoons of brown sugar, in a saucepan for ~40 seconds, until melted and bubbling. Add two sliced bananas and simmer for about 2 minutes. Add fresh ground cinnamon and nutmeg (I always eyeball spices, so no precise measurements here). Then, take half a cup of Appleton Estate Reserve dark rum (my personal favorite for cooking), add a shot of Bacardi 151, dump it in and light it up, stirring until the fire goes out on its own. Serve over vanilla or coconut ice cream. It's perfect for a lazy summer evening.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
YYW
Posts: 36,391
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4/16/2013 5:22:22 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/16/2013 5:11:05 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
I just made Bananas Foster. I never get sick of it, and it's so easy. 4 tablespoons of butter, four tablespoons of brown sugar, in a saucepan for ~40 seconds, until melted and bubbling. Add two sliced bananas and simmer for about 2 minutes. Add fresh ground cinnamon and nutmeg (I always eyeball spices, so no precise measurements here). Then, take half a cup of Appleton Estate Reserve dark rum (my personal favorite for cooking), add a shot of Bacardi 151, dump it in and light it up, stirring until the fire goes out on its own. Serve over vanilla or coconut ice cream. It's perfect for a lazy summer evening.

Omfg... I want that now.
Tsar of DDO
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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4/16/2013 5:27:47 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/16/2013 5:22:22 PM, YYW wrote:
At 4/16/2013 5:11:05 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
I just made Bananas Foster. I never get sick of it, and it's so easy. 4 tablespoons of butter, four tablespoons of brown sugar, in a saucepan for ~40 seconds, until melted and bubbling. Add two sliced bananas and simmer for about 2 minutes. Add fresh ground cinnamon and nutmeg (I always eyeball spices, so no precise measurements here). Then, take half a cup of Appleton Estate Reserve dark rum (my personal favorite for cooking), add a shot of Bacardi 151, dump it in and light it up, stirring until the fire goes out on its own. Serve over vanilla or coconut ice cream. It's perfect for a lazy summer evening.

Omfg... I want that now.

I always try and have bananas, butter, rum, ice cream and brown sugar stocked so wanting it now = having it now. It's one of those weird cravings that's especially intense. I'm the same way about brie, eggs, seaweed, and gin gimlets.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Sui_Generis
Posts: 493
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4/24/2013 5:16:49 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
If you watch House, watch the episode "Epic Fail."

House replaces solving diseases with cooking for a while. Ha.
"Mundus vult decipi--the world wants to be deceived. The truth is too complex and frightening; the taste for the truth is an acquired taste that few acquire."
-Martin Buber, I and Thou
YYW
Posts: 36,391
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4/24/2013 1:17:07 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
BTW, Cody, here's the recipe I use for Coq a Vin (based on a recipe I found online a while back)

1 tbsp olive oil
4 ounces pancetta, diced
1 carved raw chicken, (cleaned, and cut into cut legs, thighs, breasts and wings)
1/2 pound carrots cut into narrow spears
1 white onion, sliced
2 teaspoons diced fresh garlic (after you dice the garlic, press it with the edge of a chef's knife to release juices)
1/4 cup Cognac
1/2 bottle Malbec
1 cup chicken stock
10 fresh thyme sprigs
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature, divided
1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 pound frozen small whole onions
1/2 pound cremini mushrooms, stems removed and thickly sliced
Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F.

Heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven. Add the pancetta and cook over medium heat for 4-6 minutes, until lightly browned. Remove the bacon.

Meanwhile, lay the chicken out on paper towels and pat dry. Liberally sprinkle the chicken on both sides with salt and pepper. When the bacon is removed, brown the chicken pieces in batches in a single layer for about 5 minutes, turning to brown evenly. Remove the chicken to the plate with the bacon and continue to brown until all the chicken is done. Set aside.

Add the carrots, onions, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper to the pan and cook over medium heat for 10 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are lightly browned. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the Cognac and put the bacon, chicken, and any juices that collected on the plate into the pot. Add the wine, chicken stock, and thyme and bring to a simmer. Cover the pot with a tight fitting lid and place in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the chicken is sufficiently cooked. Remove from the oven and place on top of the stove.

Mash 1 tablespoon of butter and the flour together and stir into the stew. Add the frozen onions. In a medium saute pan, add the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter and cook the mushrooms over medium-low heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until browned. Add to the stew. Bring the stew to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Season to taste. Serve hot.

I like to serve this with mashed potatoes:

Brown two or three strips of bacon in a boiling pot. Remove bacon, leave grease. In same pan, boil potatoes in salt water. (I like to take whole peppercorns and place them in a metal tea ball while I'm boiling the potatoes. It adds a nice flavor, but that's just my preference.) This is a tea ball: http://www.eliterestaurantequipment.com...

Dice bacon and once potatoes are finished, drain them and return them to pan. Add butter, sour cream, dried rosemary (do not use fresh, it won't taste right), pressed garlic, bacon and milk. Mash mixture sufficiently. Serve garnished with boiled peppercorns.

Boiled kale goes pretty well with this too:

Boil kale in chicken broth. Garnish with red wine vinegar. Serve.

If you're pairing a wine with this, go with a French or Argentine malbec or a chianti.
Tsar of DDO